Maintenance Craft Skill Maturity Matrix

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Craft skills are key to the success of any maintenance organization. Determine the current maintenance craft skill maturity in your organization today and begin the journey to success. If you do not know the current maturity level of your current maintenance craft skills use this Craft Skills Maturity Matrix to determine the maturity level of maintenance skills in your organization.

If an organization does not hire or train the right people, to the right skill level, optimizing Reliability will not occur.

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  • Ricky, this is a nice perspective. A little difficult to read and cannot print but I get the point. We are doing an assessment of our LD processes across North America. We have an assessment tool but I like your perspective on the maturity of the process. One item that I have included is training plan compliance - Management's contract to execute the plan. (includes IDP - and ensures that the plan is executed as designed. Thanks for sharing.







    Larry Posluszny - Anheuser-Busch, NAZ Learning and Development
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  • Great stuff as usual. Thanks again Ricky.
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Maintenance Craft Skill Maturity Matrix

  1. 1. Elements LEVEL 1 NOT ENGAGED LEVEL 2 EXPERIMENTING LEVEL 3 ENLIGHTENED LEVEL 4 GOOD PRACTICE LEVEL 5 BEST PRACTICE Skill and Knowledge (S&K) Assessments S&K assessments have not been performed. There is little or no formal understanding of the specific requirements for each position beyond a rudimentary job description. Some S&K assessments have been performed, but the results do not seem reflected in the design of the training programs for craftsmen. Formal S&K assessments have been performed for all craft positions with the results of the assessment fully integrated into the design of the training program. This was a one-time significant effort. Job and Task Analysis is the method of performing skill assessments, with resultant skill and knowledge banks used to design the training programs. Job and Task Analyses and S&K gap assessments are routinely analyzed to determine training needs and to anticipate future workforce needs. Task Procedures and "Standard Work" The organization has placed no emphasis on the concept of standard work and has not documented any of their critical work procedures. Task procedures exist, but they are informal in nature and consist largely of copies from owners manuals and vendor data. It is clear that these documents do not affect the quality of work being performed. The organization has started placing an emphasis on the development of standard work and has documented an extensive library of standard task procedures. The standard work process is well developed with a criticality analysis being applied to identify those procedures deemed most important. Formal active training is delivered. The standard work process is well developed with an appropriate library of task procedures being developed and formal active training being delivered. These standard procedures are updated and audited. Gap Awareness Basic craft skill and knowledge gaps (skill-specific, cross-craft, multi-craft, etc.) are not routinely captured and analyzed for impact with respect to workforce development training. Basic craft skill and knowledge gaps are the focus of the training program (technical maintenance skills). The organization informally solicits training needs (beyond basic craft skills) from employees and supervisors. Program regularly surveys and reports gaps and provides training and intervention to resolve craft S&K gaps, especially with respect to future workforce needs, ROI from cross-crafting, and knowledge capture, while also addressing other gaps such as RCFA, predictive maintenance, etc. A standard process (SDCA) is used to routinely assess craft knowledge gaps most critical to business needs, including craft skills and knowledge, cross-craft needs, future workforce needs, and other domains such as RCFA, TPM, Predictive Maintenance, Problem Solving, Planning and Scheduling, etc. Addresses work environment factors affecting trainees. Training Objectives, Course Outlines, and Curriculum Maps The training program developed is informal, relying largely on publicly available materials, vendor manuals, and rudimentary photocopies of technical information. Program applies to new hires, job progression, apprentice needs where appropriate, incumbent craftsmen, refresher strategies, etc. The training program has been largely developed informally, often without learning objectives defined for the training interventions. Although they may not be based on documented learning objectives, various training offerings are provided and there is basic management documentation for craftsmen training (new hires, advancement, advanced, predictive training, RCFA, etc.) Curriculum (S&K) maps for new hires and for any craftsmen progression program are published and form the basis for the training programs, designed appropriately with linkages to the S&K requirements. Properly developed learning objectives and job performance expectations are outlined. Job requirements are tied to training strategies and performance objectives, all are linked. Strategies and curriculum maps are used to guide and manage the training needs of craftsmen, whether new hire, a craftsman with a basic level of knowledge wanting to take the next step, predictive technologies training, etc. In all cases, the training interventions are robustly developed with clear linkages to the S&K evident in its development. Properly developed learning objectives and job performance expectations have been defined and are stressed during delivery. Level 4 plus a complete career development path defined and documented for each position to include not only technical skills, but also interpersonal, leadership, and problem solving, as well as analytical skills where appropriate. Applies to new hires, job progression, apprentice needs where appropriate, incumbent craftsmen, refresher strategies, RCFA, multi-crafting, etc. Media/Mode In this category, training offerings tend to be either heavily computer- based learning without enough hands-on application, self-study, lecture, too generic, or too reliant on unstructured OJT, etc. Course Development Plans are not used or available. Some training offerings have include a blended approach of media/modes; largely attributable to individual training providers or offerings. Course Development Plans are used prior to course development. These list the media/mode strategies for each significant craftsman training offering. Vendors and in-house training staff consciously decide upon the appropriate blend of media/modes prior to course development. Course Development Plans are used both prior to course development and as part of Continuous Improvement. These list the media/mode strategies for each significant craftsman training offering. The program utilizes many mixed media such as video, classroom, computer- based training (CBT), and printed material. Blended: The curriculum has been developed using an appropriate mix of media to include printed word, video, instructor-led, self study modules, hands-on application, and CBT. These media are available to personnel on demand with significant guidance and opportunity for self development evident. Instructor Guides and Participant Guides The curriculum consists exclusively of participant materials and handouts. The materials are informal and few or no Instructor Guides or notes are provided to ensure consistency of delivery. When courseware is developed internally Instructor Guides are generally developed, but not always. Many courses that are part of the standard catalog do not have Instructor Guides - especially externally developed training. Instructor Guides are developed as part of the standard training delivery package, but are seldom used by the instructors. Inconsistencies exist from instructor to instructor. Instructors are required to own their Instructor Guides and to ensure they are up to date so that other instructors can teach the same course the same way. Instructor Guides that drive consistency in delivery are used to continuously improve the training process and to help new instructors easily learn the required training standards for craftsmen training offerings. On-the-Job Training (OJT) and Job Performance Measures The OJT program is not formally documented and consists primarily of an assignment to accompany another job incumbent for some period of time. The expectations from the training are not clear or defined. No documentation of the process exists. OJT occurs with multiple incumbents such that a variety of view points and experience levels are leveraged. No formal structure for the process exists and the measures of success are subjective at best. No documentation of the process exists. The OJT process is structured and formal with a task level listing. Performance expectations are defined; expectations are a pass/ fail with subjective feedback given informally. The process is documented with no follow-on actions - everyone passes. OJT is formally defined, but peer feedback process is poor or non-existent. Performance expectations are defined, but are subjective in nature. There is a formal documentation process with candidates required to improve their skills in certain areas - not everyone passes the first time through. The OJT process is well defined with expectations and peer feedback occurring based on the OJT performance. Instructor expectations for OJT are defined. Continual improvement element to the process clearly exists. Quantitative performance expectations are clearly defined and implemented. Job Aids No job aids are delivered. All of the learning and reference material is provided in the classroom with little effect visible on the shop floor. Job aids are incorporated into the student guides as a reference, but never appear on the shop floor. It is clear that these job aids do not effect the quality of work performed on the shop floor. Job aids are used extensively and posted on the job floor to excess. It is difficult to determine which job aids are important. The job aids are delivered passively on the shop floor with no active communication occurring. Evidence exists that a robust process of shop floor reinforcement of concepts learned in the classroom is being applied via job aids. Active communication exists regarding these documents. Job aids are developed and exist on the shop floor with the proper priority applied. They are periodically updated and replaced, and they are actively delivered to the workforce. It is evident that these job aids have an effect on the quality of work performed. Continuous improvement is evident. Continued on back... ANALYSISANALYSISDEVELOPMENTDEVELOPMENT LEVEL 1 NOT ENGAGED LEVEL 1 NOT ENGAGED LEVEL 2 EXPERIMENTING LEVEL 2 EXPERIMENTING LEVEL 4 GOOD PRACTICE LEVEL 4 GOOD PRACTICE LEVEL 5 BEST PRACTICE LEVEL 5 BEST PRACTICE Ways to Measure Your Craft Skills Program Maturity Matrix North America • Europe • Latin America • Middle East • Asia-Pacific GPAllied EMEA Guldensporenpark 21-Blok C B-9820 Merelbeke, Belgium o. +32(0)9.210.17.20 f. +32(0)9.210.17.28 www.gpallied.com World Headquarters 4200 Faber Place Drive Charleston, SC 29405 o. 888.335.8276 f. 843.414.5779
  2. 2. Elements LEVEL 1 NOT ENGAGED LEVEL 2 EXPERIMENTING LEVEL 3 ENLIGHTENED LEVEL 4 GOOD PRACTICE LEVEL 5 BEST PRACTICE Individual Development Plans (IDP) and Training Records No curriculum-based approach is applied. Training is delivered in mass to the entire population and is delivered to address the current problem of the day. No strategic approach exists. Training maps are developed, but are not specific to the job description. The level of support and coaching provided to the individual is lacking. Development of S&K is discussed and addressed infrequently, generally when pressed by an outside function. IDPs are developed to the position level but are administered poorly. Some individuals understand and gain benefit from the IDP, but they are largely an administrative task and do not have a significant effect on the workforce development efforts. IDPs are designed to the position level and are delivered to all individuals holding that job position. Some follow up and coaching is being done. IDPs are designed and delivered to the individuals within the workforce. Continual coaching and progress checks are applied. IDPs vary based on the individual needs and current skill level. Course Validation and Pilot Testing New courses added to the curriculum are not reviewed by the job incumbents and no validation or pilot proof-of-concept process exists. A cursory review of the course materials is performed by the job incumbents, but the process is done informally, likely via email with limited feedback and no interaction of the incumbents during the actual pilot delivery. A formal course review is often performed for high profile course deliveries, but is not the standard operating procedure. Improvement opportunities for high profile courses are recorded and followed up on, but not universally for all courses. A formal review process exists and is applied to all courses, but the follow up on opportunities is spotty and generally a one time effort - continual improvement is not evident. The course review and approval process is rigorous and formal. The pilot session is delivered to the most qualified job incumbents with specific and meaningful feedback provided. This feedback is incorporated into the course prior to providing the training to the general population. Training Environment No dedicated training facility exists. Training is given in any available space and the space is largely unsuitable for training delivery (noisy, poor temperature, interruptions, etc.) Dedicated training facilities exist, but they are somewhat neglected and poorly maintained. The training experience suffers due to the condition of the training facilities. Dedicated training facilities exist, and periodic upgrades occur over the years. The facility periodically becomes outdated and does not support all of the training needs beyond simple classroom instruction. Many interruptions and derailers to the training experience exist. Dedicated training facilities that are properly designed to support the optimal training delivery exist. Facilities support both classroom, CBT, and the requisite laboratory exercises. Minimal interruptions or derailers to the training experience exist. Proper dedicated training facilities exist with a dedicated training manager assigned to ensure the continued upkeep and indicated improvements to the training facility. Instructor Qualification Instructor qualification is rarely considered. Feedback on instruction is not asked for or given. Instructor feedback forms are used for training classes, but they are informal and consist primarily of subjective opinions. The results are not recorded or tracked. No actions are taken based on the results of this feedback. Instructor feedback forms are used with feedback formally tracked and corrective actions taken. Forms consist primarily of subjective opinions. An instructor certification process exists, but is informal and undocumented and consists primarily of incumbent or peer opinions. Feedback forms are used, with corrective actions being taken. A formal instructor certification process exists with an individual task certification process in place with subject matter experts, task qualification, and instructor performance audits being performed. Corrective actions are taken to address deficiencies. Learning Contracts and Performance Expectations Learning contracts are not used in any form. The expectations placed on those being trained once they return to the workplace are informal. Learning contracts are not used, but performance expectations of those attending the training are verbally delivered at the beginning of the training session. The direct supervisors of those being trained are usually not aware or informed of specific training expectations or their role in reinforcing and coaching learned skills on the job. The direct supervisors of those trained attend the opening of the training session and are part of the discussion regarding the performance expectations upon returning to the job. Learning contracts are developed prior to the execution of the training and reviewed between the trainee and direct supervisor. Clear and measurable performance expectations are established for the trainee upon returning to the job. Learning contracts are used extensively and are properly developed. Follow-up reviews are performed by the trainers or departmental sponsors in order to measure the change in workplace performance, with a feedback loop existing back to the development and execution elements of the model. Exam Evaluation Examinations or performance tests are not given in any form. The effectiveness of the training is generally not measured. There may be a tendency toward written exams without enough hands-on, practical examination. Exams are reviewed post-training, but the review is performed in an informal manner and is not documented. Corrective actions are not identified and follow up rarely occurs. Examination reviews are performed and documented, but the follow-up and corrective action process is insufficient. Exams remain largely unchanged through multiple deliveries of the training sessions. Formal examinations are provided with a single version of the exam existing. Formal exam reviews to the question level exist. The follow-up process is somewhat informal and opportunities for improvement are often missed. No statistical data of the examination performance is maintained. Written and hands-on examinations are provided as part of the training experience with multiple versions of the exam existing. Statistical measures are taken to the question and specific answer level, with problem areas addressed and corrected via existing feedback loops to the exam and training delivery process. Training Effectiveness Audits Training effectiveness audits are not considered or performed. Training effectiveness audits are performed upon return to the workplace post-training, but they consist largely of subjective opinions solely from the participants. Training effectiveness audits performed upon return to the workplace post-training, but they consist largely of subjective opinions provided not only by the participants, but also from the participant's managers. Training effectiveness audits are performed, with a mixture of subjective and quantitative performance measures (number of errors, productivity, etc.). The process to make adjustments to the training based on the audit results is spotty and inconsistent. Training effectiveness audits are performed, with a mixture of subjective and quantitative performance measures (number of errors, productivity, etc.). A robust process to make corrections and upgrades to the training delivery based on results exists. IMPLEMENTATIONIMPLEMENTATIONEXECUTIONEXECUTIONEVALUATIONEVALUATION LEVEL 1 NOT ENGAGED LEVEL 1 NOT ENGAGED LEVEL 2 EXPERIMENTING LEVEL 2 EXPERIMENTING LEVEL 4 GOOD PRACTICE LEVEL 4 GOOD PRACTICE LEVEL 5 BEST PRACTICE LEVEL 5 BEST PRACTICE Ways to Measure Your Craft Skills Program Maturity Matrix North America • Europe • Latin America • Middle East • Asia-Pacific GPAllied EMEA Guldensporenpark 21-Blok C B-9820 Merelbeke, Belgium o. +32(0)9.210.17.20 f. +32(0)9.210.17.28 www.gpallied.com World Headquarters 4200 Faber Place Drive Charleston, SC 29405 o. 888.335.8276 f. 843.414.5779

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