Social Media: Where Do We Go from Here?

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The future of marketing will be driven by how social media can turn audiences into advocates. A vital element of any company's future strategy will be the ability to reach and engage the right audience, and to unite their marketing and social elements in a way that can turn audiences into buyers and brand believers.  The leaders will be those who can harness, manage and unlock the power of not just Facebook, Twitter and other individual networks, but the entire ecosystem of conversations about their brand happening across the social web and throughout their world.

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  • Where Do We Go From Here? The future of marketing will be driven by how social media can turn audiences into advocates. A vital element of any company's future strategy will be the ability to reach and engage the right audience, and to unite their marketing and social elements in a way that can turn audiences into buyers and brand believers.  The leaders will be those who can harness, manage and unlock the power of not just Facebook, Twitter and other individual networks, but the entire ecosystem of conversations about their brand happening across the social web and throughout their world.Engaging with your customers through social networks is becoming a vital part in any company's brand marketing strategy. However, there are high demands of time and resources, plus difficulties measuring return on investment.How can you scale your social media strategy across the Internet?How do you manage multiple social marketing efforts?How do you put user generated content to work for you?How do you build and leverage advocates?
  • Rich Ullman is an Internet Executive with a history of leading marketing efforts in emerging media from the first advertising on the web through today's mobile social media revolution.  He is currently the Senior Vice-President, Marketing for Ripple6, Inc., the social marketing platform that he helped launch in 2006, and which was acquired in 2008 by Gannett Co. Inc., one of the world's leading media companies.  Mr. Ullman led marketing for About.com from start-up in 1997 as The Mining Company, through its IPO, re-branding to About, and it becoming the fifth most-visited property on the Web.   He helped create and build one of the first interactive ad agency groups at MVBMS Euro RSCG, where they built some of the first ever corporate Web sites and placed a number of the first ads ever on the Internet for Volvo, MCI, Philips and Club Med.  He began his career in the agency business with McCaffrey and McCall as a media planner for Mercedes-Benz and Tiffany & Co., worrying that his brand experience might be all downhill from there.  He is a graduate of The Ohio State University, and lives with his family in Montclair, NJ.
  • What is it? (really simple, people are using the web to connect and share stuff with each other.
  • World of mouth
  • Things are changing very quickly. You need to adapt.Nielsen data August 2009. In March it was 1 in 11. in Aug 2008; it was 1 in 15.Time spent on social network and blogging sites growing 3x faster than other activities. Increased by 18% in a year. 45 billion minutes total. If it were a country, Facebook would rank 4th in the world in terms of population.Nielsen ReportMember communities have overtaken personal email to become the world’s fourth most popular online use, after search, portals, and PC software apps. Accounts for 10% of all internet time. 67% of users do it, as compared with 61% last year.  Time spent on social network and blogging sites growing 3x faster than other activities. Increased by 18% in a year. 45 billion minutes total. One minute of every 11 spent online is spent in social networks, up from 1 in 15 in 2007.  Shift in ages to older users. Covers all demographic groups. 
  • AS:“In acting, they tell you, “Don’t just talk; don’t just let the words come out of your mouth.” Go and geet inside the heart.” This guy has the ability to do that.Recalled his 2003 campaign… Clinton and the Democratic machine came west to boost Gray Davis… and it cast Arnold as David, not Goliath. “Obama.. up against the little guy no one has ever heard of before.”“People change very quickly.”Of Obama… “He let other people do the negotiating.” “If you want to put our fires all over the world, OK. But you’ve got to be therfo those negotations.
  • AS:“In acting, they tell you, “Don’t just talk; don’t just let the words come out of your mouth.” Go and get inside the heart.” This guy has the ability to do that.Recalled his 2003 campaign… Clinton and the Democratic machine came west to boost Gray Davis… and it cast Arnold as David, not Goliath. “Obama.. up against the little guy no one has ever heard of before.”“People change very quickly.”Of Obama… “He let other people do the negotiating.” “If you want to put our fires all over the world, OK. But you’ve got to be therfo those negotations.
  • We also discovered we were under-exploiting the scale of this company. ... Many analysts covering our company think size is a detriment. They believe in the law of big numbers -- the larger you get, the harder it is to deliver the same percentage growth. Size doesn't matter. What matters is turning size into scale and turning that scale into accelerated growth. ---------------------AG Lafley. Took over as CEO of P&G in 2000.Announced last month that he was retiring.“So we expanded our mission to include the idea that "the consumer is boss." In other words, the people who buy and use P&G products are valued not just for their money, but as a rich source of in­formation and direction. If we can develop better ways of learning from them -- by listening to them, observing them in their daily lives, and even living with them -- then our mission is more likely to succeed.”===========Robert McDonaldI would argue social networks and digital media are scale at playhttp://adage.com/article?article_id=141536Convince Jack to use all 25 P&G brands.Using their products… they have a presence. They some way participate in our lives.=================    P&G CEO Bob McDonald on Why Size Doesn't MatterLafley Successor Says World's Biggest Spender Under-Leverages Its ScaleByJack NeffPublished: January 18, 2010 BATAVIA, Ohio (AdAge.com) -- The last decade at the world's biggest marketing spender belonged to A.G. Lafley, but this one belongs to Bob McDonald. In an interview with Advertising Age, the Procter & Gamble Chairman-CEO explains how he's different from his longtime mentor -- and it's more than being an Army guy trained in jungle and desert warfare vs. a Navy guy who operated a store. Bob McDonald Mr. McDonald keeps no paper files and wants to fully digitize P&G, and to the extent possible, it's marketing. He thinks all Cannes Lions should be titanium ones, because the idea always trumps the medium. He believes the company's massive size is an advantage. And he says his drive to add a billion consumers to the P&G stables over the next five years -- largely in developing markets -- doesn't mean forgoing "discontinuous innovation" in developed ones. In fact, he said this year's P&G innovation program may be the best in his 30-year career there. Ad Age: How are you different from A.G.? Mr. McDonald: We're very different. He studied the liberal arts. I studied engineering. He went in the Navy and worked in retail stores. I'm an airborne infantry ranger -- desert warfare, jungle warfare. Military experience may be common, as it is for many people in our generation, but I would argue those two are very different. If you look at the number of countries I've lived in around the world, it's very different from A.G., who lived in Japan for three or four years with P&G [Mr. McDonald has spent 15 years stationed outside the U.S., and his children had most of their primary and secondary education overseas.] The company was more deliberate about getting me ready, which is why I had more of those international experiences. Ad Age: A lot of the things you've been talking about -- touching more lives in more places more often, increasing business in developing markets -- started under A.G. Mr. McDonald: As we talked about succession, we talked about continuity with change. We want to preserve the things A.G. started, which are valuable to the company and which in his time led to doubling the business and quintupling the profit. But we also, given the deliberateness of the succession plan, did a lot of work on what was missing and what could take it to the next level. And of course A.G. was part of that. As I did that work , I led it; I discovered our purpose of touching and improving lives was incredibly powerful but underexploited. When I would go to campuses to recruit, and I typically am on a college campus once a quarter, Bear Stearns didn't exist anymore. Lehman didn't exist anymore. I'd have the largest audience I ever had at Harvard Business School. And as I talked to the students, I discovered they were looking for professions that would provide meaning for their lives. I think all of us as human beings need meaning. And it got me to realize that most people joined this company because of that purpose. Our agency partners also felt our purpose was meaningful but under-exploited. ... So I had a number of inputs telling me that what we needed to do was get us back to our purpose. And from that we developed this idea of purpose-inspired growth. We also discovered we were under-exploiting the scale of this company. ... Many analysts covering our company think size is a detriment. They believe in the law of big numbers -- the larger you get, the harder it is to deliver the same percentage growth. Size doesn't matter. What matters is turning size into scale and turning that scale into accelerated growth. So you'll see more multi-brand commercial innovation. We've created a new team, which we call the Vice Chair Team, which includes myself, [Chief Financial Officer] Jon Moeller and the vice chairmen, who get together weekly, plan personnel moves, look at our programs focused on various competitors and countries, and work to make sure we're showing up as one company and our scale is having an impact. [Another strategy is] simplification. The natural tendency of a company is to become bureaucratic, hierarchical and slow-moving. We're trying to [combat] that through the removal of layers and hierarchy and the use of technology, which frankly fits my engineering background and the fact that I studied computer science. ... We're going to use technology to make this company operate like a $10 billion company rather than an $80 billion one. Ad Age: Some people see you as more operations-focused than brand-focused. Mr. McDonald: Over a 29-year career, I was head of global operations from 2004 to 2009. The last five years tended to define me, but like everyone else, I spent a lot of time in marketing. I was the Cascade brand manager in 1983 here in the U.S. The Tide brand manager in 1984. And brand building is what I love doing. Ad Age: You led the integration of Gillette, and P&G had never acquired a company considered a competitor for leadership in industry best practice. Did that make a difference? Mr. McDonald: I think a lot of people have lost that story. I don't know of any other case where a company that did the financial acquisition also made a deliberate attempt to allow the acquired company to in many ways contribute to the new culture. Ad Age: Was it disappointing you didn't keep more of the senior people from Gillette, or was it just inevitable because of the incentive structure for the Gillette people? Mr. McDonald: Are we disappointed? Yes. Was it inevitable? Yes. I could go name by name and tell you of my disappointment but also of their personal plans that led to it. ... But I'm thrilled [Vice Chairman Global Beauty] Ed Shirley is here. I'm thrilled about Paul Fox [who heads the corporate external relations team]. ... 40% of P&G leaders now started their careers somewhere other than P&G, and that's probably the largest percentage in my career and probably ever. Ad Age: The financial markets responded favorably to you talking about taking market share again. How would you assess the impact of making that a focus? Mr. McDonald: In August, when A.G. and I did the [earnings] call, I made the statement that losing market share was no longer acceptable. It was never acceptable. But we had a different goal in the prior 12 months. That was to get the financial structure of our business right. We faced $4 billion of currency revalutation, $2 billion of incremental commodity costs on top of $1 billion the previous year. Last year was not one we're proud of. It was the most difficult one we've been through. But thank goodness we did what we did, because now we're in a position to invest in the strongest innovation program we've had in my career. And that's paying off. We promised we'd return to [organic sales] growth in the October-December quarter. We brought that forward one quarter. We only grew 2%, which isn't great, but we did grow. ... It's going to be a good year. Ad Age: Your goal to add a billion consumers in five years is a lot of people, and it seems like most would have to come from the poorest countries or poorest tiers of developing countries. Mr. McDonald: Not necessarily. You're one of them. Ad Age: I'm already there. Mr. McDonald: We've got 25 product categories in the U.S., and you're not using all 25. Ad Age: That's true, though I did buy diapers this week. Mr. McDonald: You could shave a little more. Ad Age: That's true. Mr. McDonald: In fact, you could shave your head. You use more blades that way. Certainly, developing markets is a big part of it. We've got a $25 billion business in developing markets now. That's larger than a lot of our large competitors. Again we've got to turn that size into scale and scale into growth. ... A lot of the opportunities in these markets [aren't] about switching people from a competitor. It's about getting them to use a product at all, whether it be disposable diapers, feminine care products. Or if you get into some parts of the world, you find people using the same soap to wash their hair, their bodies, their clothes, their dishes, their walls. It's a huge opportunity. But I don't want you to take away from that that we're not serious about growing our business in developed markets, because we are. We need more new categories, more new Swiffers, more new Febrezes, more discontinuous innovation, and we're working on that ... And that's the kind of thing that will provide important step change in developed markets, as well as we need better loyalty to all of our brands in all of our categories, and we're working on those things as well. Multi-brand commercial innovation is one example. If you look at our Olympic sponsorship or NFL sponsorship, it's about scale, multiple brands and increasing the size of the market basket for American consumers. Ad Age: There are people who think, in the age of social and digital media, scale isn't going to matter as much. Do you think that's true? Mr. McDonald: I actually think the reverse. I would argue social networks and digital media are scale at play. One of the things that came out of Cannes for [Global Brand-Building Officer] Marc Pritchard and me both was the scale impact of social media. The Cannes idea is a bit outdated. ... The way I see it, the awards now should all be titaniums -- you start with the idea now before you even think about a medium, and you take the idea, which is rooted in consumer insight, and only then do you figure out how to use the media, and you use every medium. And then what the marketer needs to be able to do is be able to let go ... And the best ideas were like this warden of the Great Australian Reef, where, rather than running a tourism campaign, the government decided to put a want ad in several papers around the world for a warden for the Australian reef. And they asked for videos, which is another example of what we're doing. And they let it go. So you had this guy in an icebreaker in Greenland talking about how he was the best guy. Another [takeaway] was the ubiquity of social media and how an idea can take off and you don't have to pay for it. What I worry about is that it democratizes scale. It allows the little guy to get scale almost instantaneously. And we've got to make sure we don't give up that opportunity. That's why we're talking about transforming the company through digitization, visualization, virtualization. And that's my job, which is to change the way we work by digitizing the entire company end to end. Ad Age: It looks like the battles will be particularly heated this year. How do you win in that environment? Mr. McDonald: We have more runway. We have $25 billion of business in developing and emerging markets, but it's only about 30% of our business. For Colgate and Unilever, it's a much higher percentage. We have a much broader footprint than many of our competitors, who have a footprint that looks like the colonization of the countries they came from. We can also take advantage of our scale. We don't want to go head to head in a battle with a competitor and lose value in a category. But we have enough categories to choose from that we can build infrastructure in a country in a category that might not be competitive to begin with. I think that augurs well. I think it helps that I've lived and worked in those markets. Go through the lists of CEOs for those other companies and see how many have lived and worked in the Philippines. Ad Age: You've worked in just about all regions of the world, haven't you? Mr. McDonald: [Counting] my military life, too, when I lived and worked in the jungles of Panama. That's where the Army has its jungle-warfare school. I was joking with president Martinelli of Panama -- he's also the largest retailer in Panama, so we've known him for some time -- I was joking with him that I probably know every black palm tree in Panama, but I hadn't been in his office before. Black palms have these needles, and as you're moving through the jungle at night, often you can trip and fall. Your immediate human reaction is to put your hands out. Well, these needles have poison on them, so I made sure all my soldiers were wearing gloves to deflect the needles. You learn a lot of things. We were in the Philippines almost an entire year without electricity. They had built a nuclear power plant on top of an earthquake fault. Cory Aquino built it, and President Ramos never started it up, for good reason. There was also some graft involved, and some other things. Literally we were day to day on power. ... When you live in a place like that, and you only have running water in the house a half hour a day ... it creates a sensitivity that resonates with you the rest of your life, and your family. So I don't offer flippantly that it makes a difference. Ad Age: When you consider the shift of focus to developing markets, the need to build margins in developed markets to compensate for lower margins in developing ones, the fact that digital marketing is different and often less expensive than traditional marketing, have we already seen the all-time record level of marketing spending for P&G in the U.S.? Mr. McDonald: Oh, no. We have to get in touch with our consumers. You said the spending. I don't know that I want to deal with spending. But I'm happy to talk about reach, awareness, because we're looking for the most efficient ways possible to reach consumers. But for any company that prides itself on innovation, that wants to create not just new brands but new categories of products, we're going to have to communicate with people. While people increasingly will do it digitally, there's no question that everybody won't be ready for digital communications until deep in the future. It's a fallacious connection that developing markets have lower margins and as a result you have to raise margins in developed markets. ... Our after-tax margins in developing markets are consistent with our margins in developed markets. We are not a company that doesn't challenge our organization. We don't tell people you're going into a developing market and your margin goal is half that of a developed market. Ad Age: P&G's done a very good job of fostering diversity over the years, and probably better than most of your global competitors. But over the past couple of years the senior leadership has become a bit more male, American and white, and there have been some losses of diversity at the [marketing] director level. Is that a concern? Mr. McDonald: Diversity journey is never done. And because diversity can sometimes boil down to one or two individuals, you end up having moments in time where you may not be as proud of where you are as before. For example, [former P&G President-Global Business Units Susan Arnold's] departure, while all of us knew it was coming, while she had said from the very beginning she was going to retire when she was 55, is a loss of diversity. We've made progress. Over half of our leadership team is non-American. We have Mel Healey now leading North America. I'm becoming personally responsible now. I'm the diversity leader of the company. But I will partner with MoheetNagrath, who's our global human resources officer, and we are going to promote Linda Clement-Holmes, one of our top talents in global business services, and she's from the same hometown as me in Gary, Indiana, to head our diversity efforts. I am absolutely committed and focused on that, and you're about to see that in a raft of announcements. It will be something that will occur during my tenure, because I know without it we can't be innovative. And I know it's the right thing to do. And I do the right thing, or I try to. Ad Age: Will the next CEO of P&G be a woman? Mr. McDonald: It's possible. We have a lot of talented women. It could be a man. ... It's my job to make sure there's a choice. Ad Age: There's been some movement to reshape the marketing organization and administration around consumer cohorts rather than product categories [such as organizing around male and female consumers in beauty care]. How far will that go? Mr. McDonald: The first thing we did was create an integrated brand-building organization [encompassing marketing, design and public relations]. That was my thing. And getting a guy like Marc Pritchard to lead it ... [and] also getting a very talented team of experts like [Global External Relations Officer] Christopher Hassall, Joan Lewis in market research, Phil Duncan who's a master of design. One of the things I've challenged Marc [Pritchard] on is that country boundaries are becoming less important. I'm a big believer in Sam Huntington's book "Clash of Civilizations," written in the 1980s. In essence, you could argue Huntington predicted 9/11, or at least what might happen. But what I challenged Marc is, in a digital world, what stops us from marketing to consumer cohorts without regard to country boundaries? When I was in Asia, most of the economies are run by people of Chinese descent, whether it's the Chinese who emigrated years ago from China to the Philippines, or the other Chinese groups who run the economy in Indonesia. So why, if we develop a good product that works well in China, couldn't we expand to all the Chinese in Asia, rather than think about the Chinese in Indonesia as being different from the Chinese elsewhere? The Chinese in Indonesia still speak Chinese. They still read Chinese newspapers. They still have Chinese street signs. The ultimate in marketing is marketing to the individual and customizing products to the individual. But then you have a continuum from the post-World War II mass marketing to the individual marketing of the digital age. And anything that helps us generalize or group or simplify the marketing to people over time we will do that until we get to the ultimate, which is one on one. And I think marketing civilizations, as I call it, or cohorts, is one of those routes. Ad Age: Is there another Swiffer or Febreze in the pipeline for P&G? Mr. McDonald: Well, there'd better be. I talked about the importance of discontinuous innovation. And we're working on a lot of discontinuous innovation. Each one of our vice chair organizations has a new business development organization that's charged with developing new categories or brands. The periods of time historically of growth for the company were when we acquired or launched new categories and new brands, so it's not rocket science. I was talking with John Smale recently, and you could just see it in the history of his time as CEO. I had lunch with DurkJager last week, and we were talking about the discontinuous innovation he brought to the company. We've got to do it. We have the strongest innovation program now that I can ever remember. And a lot of it will be revealed over the next six months. ... Remember the strategy of touch more lives more completely in more parts of the world. When I talk to business units, it's to ask why isn't Febreze in every part of the world. What's it going to take to get oral care into every part of the world? How long is it going to take? And I'm impatient. Ad Age: What keeps you awake at night? Mr. McDonald: The biggest thing is the parable of the frog in the boiling water. That's why today, of the Fortune 50 from 1955, only nine of those companies still exist. P&G is one of them. I want P&G to be on that list 172 years from now, because that means we're touching and improving more lives. The only thing that can kick us off that list is complacency or inability to learn new things or unwillingness to change.Copyright © 1992-2010 Crain Communications | Privacy Statement | Contact Us
  • The most striking feature of obama’s campaign:“the amazing young, Internet-enabled grass roots movement he mobilized to get elected.The most striking feature of this year: Its absence.Moon shot.2 programs:1. NationalLabDay.org; Jack Hidary. K-12Any teacher in america can go to the site; enter the science project he’s teaching… and get matched with volunteer scientists and enginners. They communicate directly or via skype.CHI: Civil Engineer is helping kids to build a bridge.IDAHO: building a working river delta inside the classroom.2. www.NTFE.com: --- works in low income neigborhoods.Ten9eight.com Inspirational heartwarming film. Hoop Dreams?Winner was a boy who created “socially meaningful t-shirts.”
  • The most striking feature of obama’s campaign:“the amazing young, Internet-enabled grass roots movement he mobilized to get elected.The most striking feature of this year: Its absence.Moon shot.2 programs:1. NationalLabDay.org; Jack Hidary. K-12Any teacher in america can go to the site; enter the science project he’s teaching… and get matched with volunteer scientists and enginners. They communicate directly or via skype.CHI: Civil Engineer is helping kids to build a bridge.IDAHO: building a working river delta inside the classroom.2. www.NTFE.com: --- works in low income neigborhoods.Ten9eight.com Inspirational heartwarming film. Hoop Dreams?Winner was a boy who created “socially meaningful t-shirts.”
  • “As an organization, Apple is more disciplined in managing message than even the Obama campaign.“the tablet is said to create a new digital reading experience… offering publishing compainies a do-over.”Opened up kindle to applications… and new kinds of content.Two different App-tracking companies have detected what’s happening. One says about 50 devices in or around Cupertino.Scale from 3.5 to 10 inches.Changing of media consumption habitsApple has spen 1.5 years training developers to program their devices.
  • http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/10/weekinreview/10stone.htmlhttp://twitter.com/lrainie
  • http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-us-children-who-own-mobile-phones-2010-1?utm_source=Triggermail&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=SAI_COTD_011910CHART OF THE DAY: One Third Of U.S. 11-Year-Olds Have CellphonesDan Frommer and KameliaAngelova | Jan. 19, 2010, 3:15 PM | 1,083 | More kids are getting mobile phones: Last year, more than 35% of U.S. children ages 10-11 had cellphones, almost double the amount in 2005, according to Mediamark data, via eMarketer. And even more than 5% of 6-7-year-olds had cellphones last year.Takeaway: The audience for kids-focused mobile content, apps, and advertising is growing rapidly.Follow the Chart Of The Day on Twitter: www.twitter.com/chartofthedayWhile you may not be marketing to 10 year olds….
  • ZuckSteveRandall StephensonAn AT&T customer-service representative replied to the first note and said the company couldn't accommodate the request, and Galante said he planned to leave AT&T and buy the new HTC EVO 4G phone being released today by Sprint Nextel Corp.After the second e-mail, though, the tone from the responding AT&T rep took a surprising turn."I want to first thank you for the feedback," the rep said in a voice mail Galante posted on his blog (attepicfail.tumblr.com), along with his original e-mails. "Going forward, I need to warn you that if you continue to send e-mails to Randall Stephenson, a cease-and-desist letter may be sent to you."n
  • ZuckSteveRandall StephensoAn AT&T customer-service representative replied to the first note and said the company couldn't accommodate the request, and Galante said he planned to leave AT&T and buy the new HTC EVO 4G phone being released today by Sprint Nextel Corp.After the second e-mail, though, the tone from the responding AT&T rep took a surprising turn."I want to first thank you for the feedback," the rep said in a voice mail Galante posted on his blog (attepicfail.tumblr.com), along with his original e-mails. "Going forward, I need to warn you that if you continue to send e-mails to Randall Stephenson, a cease-and-desist letter may be sent to you."n
  • ZuckSteveRandall StephensoAn AT&T customer-service representative replied to the first note and said the company couldn't accommodate the request, and Galante said he planned to leave AT&T and buy the new HTC EVO 4G phone being released today by Sprint Nextel Corp.After the second e-mail, though, the tone from the responding AT&T rep took a surprising turn."I want to first thank you for the feedback," the rep said in a voice mail Galante posted on his blog (attepicfail.tumblr.com), along with his original e-mails. "Going forward, I need to warn you that if you continue to send e-mails to Randall Stephenson, a cease-and-desist letter may be sent to you."n
  • 9 years ago:Yahoo was still king.No Facebook. No myspace. Not even Blogs.Yankees were about to win the World Series for the 3rd time.In a minute back to the last 9 months.-----
  • No debate, It started with Hotwired.Cutting edge use of the technology was a flat graphic, and a creative message.Volvo… safe in a way… but in hindsight prescient. Click the ad, you fill out a questionnaire that was MAILED to you. The goal? Establish a relationship.This was about creating connections.
  • And the cutting edge for creating connections meant you had to send them to your web site… which was essentially a brochure…
  • Fast forward to 2001. A lot of money was made and lost in between there… but the big advertising innovation that came to emerge was how to make those ads more creative than they were.Indeed you can also connect THAT to your web site.Red Herring”:We define rich media as the use (or combination) of video, voice, data, and other technologies…to create an otherwise unattainable user experience… It adds the dimensions of context and personalization to provide relevance that cannot be matched by other communications or broadcast media… we expect that rich media will significantly add to the user experience and, therefore, will be the Internet's next "killer app."
  • Fast forward to today….What about the past 9 years, and specifically, the past nine months that have been so ripe with change.
  • Ad Age said what to do… and it was not to get more “creative.”Don’t create more bad direct marketing.Don’t create TV-like messages in a box. http://adage.com/article?article_id=139931Online Advertising Needs a Different Kind of CreativityAn Ad Age EditorialPublished:October 26, 2009It's become clear that those creating online ads need to step up the creative game. But before marketers and agencies rush to hire Cannes winners to lovingly craft a new crop of banner ads, they should perhaps redefine the word "creative." Last week, Dynamic Logic released a study indicating that it's bad creative that makes online advertising ineffective. The study determined that creative factors such as persistent branding, strong calls to action and even human faces -- and not super-targeted or high-profile ad placements -- make for better ad recall, brand awareness and purchase intent. But we're not so sure branding, human faces and logos -- the most traditional aspects of traditional advertising -- are the sort of creativity needed in online advertising. That seems an extension of too much current online advertising, which is either bad direct marketing in ad form, or TV-ad thinking in a box online. Creativity, in this case, should revolve around interactivity and utility. To get a consumer to engage with an online ad -- an ad that will take her away from the content she is reading -- marketers will have to find a creative solution to give the consumer something she needs. Give her tips, invite her to contribute her own thoughts. Offer her other online resources dealing with your brand. Better yet, couple the creativity with courage -- the courage to link comments or tweets about your brand (or the subject) at hand. Yes, even the bad ones. If a company so believes in its product or service, then why not also include links to product reviews at independent sites or objective professional reviews (which is not the same as cherrypicking quotes out of reviews). Perhaps a smart marketer could persuade Consumer Reports itself to let advertisers link to ConsumerReports.org reviews. On the web, a marketer isn't trying to entertain a passive couch-surfer. It's interrupting an active user, ferreting around for information or entertainment. It may be harder to capture that user's attention, but if you can hook into that consumer's interest and passion, she may prove more valuable to your brand. In short, when advertising online, there has to be a way to make your message less like advertising and more like content. And that's the creative yardstick by which marketers should measure their efforts.
  • This is Wendy Clark.SVP, Integrated Marketing and Communications Capabilities, Coca-Cola.And last week she said this (among other things) during a speech to about 300 marketers in Chicago.There is no way to shut down the conversations that are happening. When you realize that, you can begin to leverage those conversations by participating in them.Now and in the future, Ad Managers will be more like Content Managers. They will focus on finding and connecting with those who are creating many of these messages. Some will be advocates and some will not. Regardless, they are important part of shaping YOUR message.You must go into the consumer’s backyard and participate with them.Curate content… co-create with users… engage and interact with all that is there.
  • Heather McNamara6 organs removed“It was.. I mean, the most amazing experience of all was knowing that she just wasn’t a patient… they cared. Everybody cared. It was about Heather getting better.”This is a story about institutions realizing that people are what is important, and findListening and engaging – and genuinely succeeding is based upon this principle.Look at her face; go back and listen to the video – what you have there is an advocate for what
  • http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/03/29/has-viral-gone-viralMarch 29, 2010, 6:33 pmHas Viral Gone Viral?By NICK BILTON Over the last year, we’ve seen the rapid development of the real-time Web, incorporating the spread of news, status updates and the entertainment we share and consume. It’s as if the idea of “going viral” has, well, gone viral itself.A case in point: when Michael Jackson died last year, it took only minutes for traffic to spike worldwide on NYTimes.com. AOL’s instant messenger service almost crashed as people tried to share the information of his death as quickly as possible and Twitter saw strains as the news unfurled.In a 1960 television interview, Marshall McLuhan, the famous media professor and theorist, explained that even then, the spread of media allowed information to travel through space and time like never before.McLuhan said, “These new media have made our world into a single unit. The world is now like a continually sounding tribal drum, where everybody gets the message all the time.”Today, not only is this exacerbated by more news outlets, but by who delivers this information. In the 1960s, large media outlets, including daily newspapers and the nightly television news, were the first to spread information at viral speeds. But today, it seems that everyone can do it. Let me give you an example. Over the last few months, there’s been a tremendous amount of media coverage about the Web site Chatroulette, which randomly connects webcam-equipped users for face-to-face interactions. Two weeks ago, when I sat down with AndreyTernovskiy, the 17-year-old founder of the site, for a One on One interview, I asked him if there was a single moment when traffic spiked on the site. Mr. Ternovskiy said that growth was just continual. There wasn’t a single news site, blog, or social network that created a spike in the number of users.He explained that last November, when he started the Web site, he logged less than 500 visitors for the month. Just three months later, without any advertising or promotion, he had 30 million unique users visiting the site — an average of a million unique visitors a day.He said that the day he started Chatroulette, he saw 20 users on the site and it just grew instantly and organically from there. “The site doubled and it continued to double every day since then,” Mr. Ternovskiy said.Granted, Chatroulette doesn’t require a sign-up process: you just click a button, and you’re on your way.But the sites that helped spread the word of Chatroulette — Twitter, Facebook and other social Web sites — sometimes took years to see 30 million unique users. Chatroulette’s viral growth, aided by social media, suggests that the already speedy clock of Internet time is running faster than ever.
  • As niche networks are quickly becoming the "go-to" for deep discussions around hobbies and common interests, how can your clients overcome the noise and genuinely connect with consumers, while still allowing their message to scale? Learn the seven C's of social marketing: campaigns, conversations, community, clicks, creativity, collaboration, and connections.=============Click-through rates on banner ads are down and consumers are developing increasingly complex social graphs. As niche networks are quickly becoming the “go-to” for deep discussions around hobbies and common interests, how can your client’s brands  overcome the noise and genuinely connect with consumers while still allowing their message to scale?  Join us as we discuss the seven C's of social marketing: Campaigns, Conversations, Community, Clicks, Creativity, Collaboration and Connections.      ================
  • ===============Click-through rates on banner ads are down and consumers are developing increasingly complex social graphs. As niche networks are quickly becoming the “go-to” for deep discussions around hobbies and common interests, how can your client’s brands  overcome the noise and genuinely connect with consumers while still allowing their message to scale?  Join us as we discuss the seven C's of social marketing: Campaigns, Conversations, Community, Clicks, Creativity, Collaboration and Connections.     
  • The opportunity of social is a long term relationship with your customersOnce you become a fan, show me the loveIgnite with a campaign-like object, but use it longer termNot the optimal use of Social CurrencyOnce I am a fan, I expect some love, not just a one night stand
  • Ad Age Editor Jonah Bloom told us another way to get smarter:Will.i.am -- Marketer of the yearMarketing is continuous. Consumers don’t switch on/off. Campaigns only do becauseThey don’t need to.Mostly can’t afford to.“The END” – it’s a diary.It’s about collaboration.“While most brands still treat branded entertainment as a chance to insert their name in a show in a way that'll challenge our TiVo skills, Will.i.am sees platforms, distribution, mutual benefit.”Jonah Bloom: Will.i.am is my marketer of the year. Most brands are still grappling like first-time makeout artists with the most fundamental shift of the last decade -- from marketer as message-pushing machine to marketer as creators of stuff consumers will actually pull toward them. But the Black Eyed Peas, having mastered that shift, are already showing an understanding of perhaps the second-most important change: from campaign to continuous conversation.======================http://adage.com/columns/article?article_id=139138The Black Eyed Peas Frontman Understand That Consumers Don't Switch on and offby Jonah BloomPublished: September 21, 2009 Will.i.am is my marketer of the year. Sure, marketing begins with product, and we could certainly question the quality of the Black Eyed Peas' music. But here's what we know: Will.i.am, Fergie and MCs, Apl.de.ap and Taboo, deliver something people want. The Peas have been at the top of Billboard Hot 100 for 24 weeks as this goes to press -- by far the longest No. 1 run in the chart's 51-year history. What they do is hard to describe, so I'll borrow from Jody Rosen in Rolling Stone: "They have made a kind of spiritual practice of recording dumb songs -- a total aesthetic commitment that extends from their garish wardrobes to their United Colors of Benetton worldview." But beyond the product -- and simultaneously inseparable from it -- is Will.i.am's understanding of today's social-marketing world. Most brands are still grappling like first-time makeout artists with the most fundamental shift of the last decade -- from marketer as message-pushing machine to marketer as creators of stuff consumers will actually pull toward them. But the Black Eyed Peas, having mastered that shift, are already showing an understanding of perhaps the second-most important change: from campaign to continuous conversation. Consumers don't switch on and off, and products don't sell for two weeks and then disappear from retail channels, but most marketers still do the vast majority of their work in sporadic bursts, often going whole quarters, even years between one one-way push and the next. However, our lovely-lady-lump creators are doing it differently. Their 2009 album, "The END," was not only a nice sales gimmick -- playing off speculation about Fergie going entirely solo and thus essentially squishing the Peas -- but also a big idea. "The END" is supposed to stand for The Energy Never Dies and the idea is that it's a live, evolving, co-created piece of work. "It's a diary ... of music that at any given time, depending on the inspiration, you can add to it," Wil.i.am told Billboard.com. "When it comes out, there'll be 12 songs on it, but the next day there could be 100 songs, 50 sketches, 1,000 blogs all (online) around 'The End,' so the energy really, truly never dies. I'm trying to break away from the concept of an album. What is an album when you put 12 songs on iTunes and people can pick at it like scabs? That's not an album. There is no album anymore." Exactly. Then there's Will.i.am's understanding of collaboration. I recently read Seth Stevenson in Slate calling the Peas' "I Got A Feeling" ad for Target an abomination. The (rather nifty) headline: "Will.i.shill." Well, yes, he definitely shills. In fact if there's a living, breathing example of the fact that the alleged walls between most content and commerce are not just crumbling but gone, the Black Eyed Peas would be it. And, regardless of how you feel about that from a cultural standpoint, what that ad -- and many of Black Eyed Peas videos and lyrics -- demonstrated in business terms, was a clear understanding of the potential of collaboration between content creators and brands. While most brands still treat branded entertainment as a chance to insert their name in a show in a way that'll challenge our TiVo skills, Will.i.am sees platforms, distribution, mutual benefit. He also knows how to integrate the band into popular culture, and, again, simultaneously create culture. His Obama-boosting music video "Yes We Can," was not only lauded by some critics as the best commercial of the year, but it epitomized the way an individual -- especially one with lots of famous friends -- can make a mark. As he told the L.A. Times at the time: "It's not part of a campaign. There's no corporation behind it -- the record company couldn't get involved. I did it on my own." Most remarkably, he shot it, cut it and distributed it in 48 hours. (Exactly the kind of nimble, reactive, fast-turnaround approach so many brands need, but don't have.) So, let's get this started: If Will.i.am is my Marketer of the Year, who is yours?
  • ===========================================From Mashable: http://mashable.com/2009/11/17/coke-expedition-206/ With Expedition 206, Coke is really doing something unique. Not only are they letting the winners travel the globe to visit all 206 markets, they are going to utilize the social web along the way.This is how it works: other than airfare, the team members will have to make their own way across the world. They have a schedule of stops, but they have to get their own food, find their own places to stay and meet up with the locals themselves. The team is going to be given per diem for food and local travel, but what they do and where they do it is pretty much up to the team members — and the people at home interacting with the Expedition 206 team online.The team will be visiting the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics, the FIFA World Cup in South Africa and the World Expo in Shanghai. They will be sharing their updates on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube (), Flickr (), and other social networking sites. You can follow the progress on those channels or see the real-time lifestreams at Expedition206.com.Along the way, people at home can recommend places to stay or must-see attractions, restaurants to definitely visit — or avoid — and more. Who knows, if the team happens to be in your area — you might even want to meet up for a Coke or show them something cool in your area.The whole trip is all about interacting with people around the world and sharing the idea of happiness and connecting on a personal level and making connections that can exist beyond just language.
  • Almost everyone wants to make healthier choices, but they don’t always know how. The amount of information available on wellness, nutrition and exercise is overwhelming, to say the least. Even when we do know how to improve our health, we often try to make sweeping changes or set goals that seem too daunting to reach. Healthymagination is about becoming healthier, through the sharing of imaginative ideas and proven solutions. It goes beyond innovations in the fields of technology and medicine, celebrating the people behind these advancements. Seeking to build stronger relationships between patients and doctors, GE created healthymagination to gather, share and discuss healthy ideas.Because healthymagination is about becoming healthier together, it takes the form of multiple projects that you can participate in, whether you’re looking to change your lifestyle or fine-tune your approach to health. Making healthy decisions should be easy...and fun.
  • … touch on the key question of “how do we define measurement in social?” ===============Test your way into establishing ROIUtilize traditional media metricsClicks, engagement, viewsLeverage social “Listening” Sentiment1. Tremendous data can be generated2. Tools for analysis are critical to success3. Filtering conversations is not convenient, it’s required.4. Cross reference with rich social data==========================What kinds of relationships are forming?How do people prefer to communicate? What do they find important or valuable?==========================http://www.marketersstudio.com/2009/11/100-ways-to-measure-social-media-.html100 Ways to Measure Social Media Originally published in MediaPost's Social Media InsiderIf there's anyone out there left who says you can't measure social media, here are a hundred answers.At most of the events I've been to lately, measurement continues to be a hot topic. The first question that comes up is, "What can I measure?" That's where this cheat sheet can come in handy: a list of 100 thought-starters.Some entries here can be interpreted several ways. Depending on how you define them, some of these metrics may seem redundant, while others may seem so broad that they can be broken out further. Many of these can be combined with each other to create new metrics that can then be tracked over time. It's a start, though, so dive in and consider which ones may apply to programs you're working on.1.     Volume of consumer-created buzz for a brand based on number of posts2.     Amount of buzz based on number of impressions3.     Shift in buzz over time4.     Buzz by time of day / daypart5.     Seasonality of buzz6.     Competitive buzz7.     Buzz by category / topic8.     Buzz by social channel (forums, social networks, blogs, Twitter, etc)9.     Buzz by stage in purchase funnel (e.g., researching vs. completing transaction vs. post-purchase)10.  Asset popularity (e.g., if several videos are available to embed, which is used more)11.  Mainstream media mentions12.  Fans13.  Followers14.  Friends15.  Growth rate of fans, followers, and friends16.  Rate of virality / pass-along17.  Change in virality rates over time18.  Second-degree reach (connections to fans, followers, and friends exposed - by people or impressions)19.  Embeds / Installs20.  Downloads21.  Uploads22.  User-initiated views (e.g., for videos)23.  Ratio of embeds or favoriting to views24.  Likes / favorites25.  Comments26.  Ratings27.  Social bookmarks28.  Subscriptions (RSS, podcasts, video series)29.  Pageviews (for blogs, microsites, etc)30.  Effective CPM based on spend per impressions received31.  Change in search engine rankings for the site linked to through social media32.  Change in search engine share of voice for all social sites promoting the brand33.  Increase in searches due to social activity34.  Percentage of buzz containing links35.  Links ranked by influence of publishers36.  Percentage of buzz containing multimedia (images, video, audio)37.  Share of voice on social sites when running earned and paid media in same environment38.  Influence of consumers reached39.  Influence of publishers reached (e.g., blogs)40.  Influence of brands participating in social channels41.  Demographics of target audience engaged with social channels42.  Demographics of audience reached through social media43.  Social media habits/interests of target audience44.  Geography of participating consumers45.  Sentiment by volume of posts46.  Sentiment by volume of impressions47.  Shift in sentiment before, during, and after social marketing programs48.  Languages spoken by participating consumers49.  Time spent with distributed content50.  Time spent on site through social media referrals51.  Method of content discovery (search, pass-along, discovery engines, etc)52.  Clicks53.  Percentage of traffic generated from earned media54.  View-throughs55.  Number of interactions56.  Interaction/engagement rate57.  Frequency of social interactions per consumer58.  Percentage of videos viewed59.  Polls taken / votes received60.  Brand association61.  Purchase consideration62.  Number of user-generated submissions received63.  Exposures of virtual gifts64.  Number of virtual gifts given65.  Relative popularity of content66.  Tags added67.  Attributes of tags (e.g., how well they match the brand's perception of itself)68.  Registrations from third-party social logins (e.g., Facebook Connect, Twitter OAuth)69.  Registrations by channel (e.g., Web, desktop application, mobile application, SMS, etc)70.  Contest entries71.  Number of chat room participants72.  Wiki contributors73.  Impact of offline marketing/events on social marketing programs or buzz74.  User-generated content created that can be used by the marketer in other channels75.  Customers assisted76.  Savings per customer assisted through direct social media interactions compared to other channels (e.g., call centers, in-store)77.  Savings generated by enabling customers to connect with each other78.  Impact on first contact resolution (FCR) (hat tip to Forrester Research for that one)79.  Customer satisfaction80.  Volume of customer feedback generated81.  Research & development time saved based on feedback from social media82.  Suggestions implemented from social feedback83.  Costs saved from not spending on traditional research84.  Impact on online sales85.  Impact on offline sales86.  Discount redemption rate87.  Impact on other offline behavior (e.g., TV tune-in)88.  Leads generated89.  Products sampled90.  Visits to store locator pages91.  Conversion change due to user ratings, reviews92.  Rate of customer/visitor retention93.  Impact on customer lifetime value94.  Customer acquisition / retention costs through social media95.  Change in market share96.  Earned media's impact on results from paid media97.  Responses to socially posted events98.  Attendance generated at in-person events99.  Employees reached (for internal programs)100.  Job applications received
  • Gives women a platform to share their remarkable survival journeys andTo date, over 30,000 celebrations have been created from family and friends with practically no promotional effortOn average, Celebration Chain has a 5-8 minute brand exposureProject Goal: To provide guidance to women with breast cancer from those who have experienced it before them and place Arimidex at the centre of the conversation.Challenge: Over 200,000 people develop breast cancer each year. Each one needs to be given a voice—and a platform to share it.Insight:Breast cancer is a complex experience and women touched by it feel confused, frightened, and distressed, often not knowing where to turn to for support.Women who have experienced it often want to give back to the community
  • ==========================Custom Research for Post Cereals. Embedded in an existing social network.“We were able to reach out to moms in a way that was convenient and comfortable for them. It created honest conversations and feedback about our brand which allowed for solid insights.”Greg Lanides, Brand Manager, Grape Nuts
  • Community , Chantics – smoking cessation drug from PfizerYou can’t guilt people into it.Herb from Tuscaloosa25-30 people… curating their stories.Advertising is becoming very personalReal People. Real Stories. Hear from smokers who quit with CHANTIX and supportIf you're thinking about quitting smoking, you know it's a personal decision. And you also know that the reasons to quit are different for everyone. And so are the challenges. But it can be done. Explore the videos below to meet quitters and hear their personal quit stories. Also hear from a Pfizer scientist about how his experience of quitting cold turkey led to the development of CHANTIX. Project Goal: Empower successful users of Chantix to connect with aspiring quitters and support current participants of the GetQuit Program.Approach:Reinforce the strategic shift from “a pill” to “a plan”. Provide tutorials, forums, social media tools and shareable content for ambassadors to more effectively support participants.Insight:When smokers are able to successfully quit after numerous failed attempts, they are proud of the achievement and want to help othersParticipants in GetQuit clinics research expressed interest in an ongoing group support following attendance at the in-person clinicAn abundance of online Smoking Cessation groups exist online but none supported by a product or brandIncreased awareness of quitting smoking and encourage people to visit a doctor to develop a cessation planOvercame adverse events in category Implemented program during holiday timeframe to capitalize on New Year’s resolutionsTo-date, several thousand people have committed to stop smoking and have submitted their photo via website, cell phone or street photographersPositive press in both trade and mainstream publications
  • Through content management systemsListening PlatformsMonitoring PlatformsCreating Single Conversations
  • Social Media: Where Do We Go from Here?

    1. 1. Where Do We Go From Here? How social media can turn audiences into advocates June 4, 2010 Rich Ullman @richullman ullman.rich@gmail.com
    2. 2. Who is Rich • Advertising Agency – Media Planner – Automotive Ads • Tequila • First Interactive Agency • The Mining Company -> About.com – Web 1.0 • Ripple6 – Social Platform for Marketers and Publishers
    3. 3. What is Social Media?
    4. 4. People using the web to connect and share.
    5. 5. Why It Changes Things • Demographics • Speed of Adoption • Cross Generational Adoption • Storytelling  Word of Mouth • User Generated Content • Individuals vs. Institutions • Opinions • What Do I Trust? • How Do I Get Information • Mobile
    6. 6. http://www.youtube.com/watch#!v=lFZ0z5Fm-Ng
    7. 7. Why It’s Important
    8. 8. People Connect and Share Product Info 69% have said something about a company or brand
    9. 9. Social Networks: More and More Time 1 of every 6 minutes spent online in social networks Time spent in social nets growing 3x faster than any other segment Source: Nielsen Online; August 2009.
    10. 10. Why Should You Care?
    11. 11. Which Doesn’t Belong and Why?
    12. 12. Arnold and Scott Brown
    13. 13. It’s about scale. Size Doesn’t Matter “I would argue social networks and digital media are scale at play…” Scale Ubiquity The Little Guy Presence http://adage.com/article?article_id=141536
    14. 14. Which Doesn’t Belong and Why?
    15. 15. Thomas Friedman and President Obama
    16. 16. It’s About Inspiring the Audience “More (Steve) Jobs Jobs Jobs Jobs” “Conjuring Up Buzz Without a Word”
    17. 17. Which Doesn’t Belong? (and Why)
    18. 18. The Children of Cyberspace “People two, three or four years apart are having completely different experiences with technology. College students scratch their heads at what their high school siblings are doing, and they scratch their heads at their younger siblings. It has sped up generational differences.” Lee Rainie Director of the Pew Internet Project http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/10/weekinreview/10stone.html
    19. 19. What will be their expectations? Source: Business Insider, Silicon Alley Insider
    20. 20. Recap • Scale, Presence, Inside the Heart • Inspiring Your Audience • Expectations
    21. 21. Today
    22. 22. June 4, 2010
    23. 23. Who’s Privacy is it Anyway?
    24. 24. June 4, 2010
    25. 25. Tomorrow or Yesterday?
    26. 26. Advertising Week 2009 #adweek “More change in ad business in last 9 months than in last 9 years.”
    27. 27. Online Advertising Begins Click here… go to where? What kind of Volvo would you be interested in? Static GIF’s 476x60 (pre-IAB) Click Though
    28. 28. State of the Art Your Web Site Connections 1994 Static Banner Ads
    29. 29. State of the Art Your Web Site Connections Context Creativity Analytics & Insight Rich Media Ads 1994 2001 Static Banner a Ads
    30. 30. Now What? “More change in ad business in last 9 months than in last 9 years.” ? 1994 2001 Today
    31. 31. A Different Kind of Creativity “… invite her to contribute her own thoughts.” “… there has to be a way to make your message less like advertising and more like content.”
    32. 32. “Engaged Communities Matter” “We must let the conversations take place.” “Advertising was 2008. 2009 and beyond is about Communities and Connections.” “If you build it…” “Curate…”
    33. 33. Heather McNamara
    34. 34. March 29, 2010: “Has Viral Gone Viral?” “These new media have made our world into a single unit. The world is now like a continually sounding tribal drum, where everybody gets the message all the time.” Marshall McLuhan 1960
    35. 35. “The 7 C’s of Social Marketing” What Do I Do?
    36. 36. Welcome to Tomorrow. • Campaigns • Collaboration • Clicks • Conversations • Community • Creativity • Connected
    37. 37. “Campaigns” in Social: vs
    38. 38. Campaigns are Dead. “Mastering the art of the continuous campaign.”
    39. 39. Collaboration Wins. “I’d like to teach the world to sing?”
    40. 40. Collaboration is Everywhere.
    41. 41. Clicks? No. “Measurement? Yes!!! http://www.marketersstudio.com/2009/11/100-ways-to-measure-social-media-.html
    42. 42. Be a Curator of Conversations 45
    43. 43. Conversations Can Go Deep (and Private) • 4 week qualitative study • Embedded in a social network. • 94 moms • 70 topics
    44. 44. Communities take it personally. Curate stories. Provide support.
    45. 45. Connecting Efforts
    46. 46. Summary 1. Social Media is big and getting bigger 2. It is a change in lifestyle and behavior (not just media consumption) 3. Tremendous opportunity to connect people in need, with people in the know… and trustworthy information.
    47. 47. Solving the Brand Marketer’s Problem • Social Media can be overwhelming. – There are numerous social media outlets that are disconnected and disjointed • How can you easily manage your social media presence? • How can you easily listen & engage in conversations with your consumers across the web? – And then optimize your experience!
    48. 48. Thank You.

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