THE IMPORTANCE OF DEVELOPING EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCEA VITALLEADERSHIP QUALITY“Emotional Intelligence is the key to happines...
WELCOME TO AGORA © “AWARENESS” Copyright: Richard Tredennick-Titchen 2011
AGORAAGORA asks you to dig out what is already insideyou, examine it, and decide what action you need totake, in order to ...
Stop & Think• Cross out six letters  from the line so that BSAINXLEATNTEARS  all the remaining  letters in the  sequence f...
THE ICEBERGHOW MUCH DO YOU SEE OF   AN ICEBERG?
THE ICEBERG      ONLY 10% OF      ANY ICEBERG      IS VISIBLE      THE      REMAINING      90% IS BELOW      SEA LEVEL
IQ & EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE
EMOTIONAL                INTELLIGENCE•   The most successful people in    business have high EQ’s•   EQ enables you to hav...
EMOTIONAL               INTELLIGENCE•   Emotionally intelligent people have    a high level of self-confidence &    self-e...
EMOTIONAL          INTELLIGENCE• Emotionally intelligent people  are in control of their emotions• They are able to manage...
HOW MUCH DO      OTHERS SEE OF YOU KNOWN      KNOWLEDGETO OTHERS              SKILLS    SEA LEVELUNKNOWNTO OTHERS         ...
BENEATH THE SURFACE KNOWN          KNOWLEDGETO OTHERS                  SKILLS               SEA LEVELUNKNOWNTO OTHERS     ...
YOU ARE JUDGED BY YOUR     “BEHAVIOUR” KNOWNTO OTHERS         BEHAVIOR                                             SEA LEV...
SELF-AWARENESS1. EMOTIONAL AWARENESS                         b. Know which emotions Individuals with this      they are fe...
SELF-AWARENESS2. ACCURATE SELF-ASSESSMENT                        b. Aware of their strengths                           & w...
SELF-AWARENESS3. SELF-CONFIDENCE                         b. Present themselves                            with self-assura...
SELF-REGULATION•   SELF-CONTROL        a. Manage their                           impulsive &                           dis...
SELF-REGULATION2. TRUSTWORTHINESS                        b. Act ethically at all times                        c. Build tru...
SELF-REGULATION3. CONSCIENTIOUSNESS                        b. Meet commitments                           & keep promises  ...
SELF-REGULATION4. ADAPTABILITY                        b. Smoothly handle                           multiple demands,      ...
SELF-REGULATION5. INNOVATIVENESS                        b. Seek out fresh ideas                           from a wide vari...
SELF-MOTIVATION1. ACHIEVEMENT DRIVE    a. Are results orientated                           with a high drive to           ...
SELF-MOTIVATION2. COMMITMENT                        b. Readily make personal or                           group sacrifices...
SELF-MOTIVATION3. INITIATIVE           a. Are ready to seize                           opportunities                      ...
SELF-MOTIVATION4. OPTIMISM                        b. Persist in attaining goals                           despite obstacle...
SOCIAL-AWARENESS1. EMPATHY                        c. Are attentive to emotionalIndividuals with this                      ...
SELF-MOTIVATION2. DEVELOPING OTHERS                                       b. Acknowledge & reward                         ...
SELF-MOTIVATION3. LEVERAGING DIVERSITY                          b. Respect & relate                             well to pe...
Stop & Think       KEY THINKERS• “If your emotional abilities aren’t in hand, if  you don’t have self-awareness, if you ar...
Stop & Think         IDENTIFY YOUR           STRENGTHS• We all have strengths &  weaknesses• What is important are  our st...
STRENGTHS OF          HUMANITY• Those centered around  relationships with others• The capacity to love &  recieve love• Ki...
STRENGTHS OF                  KNOWLEDGE• Those related to aquiring &  using new knowledge•   Creativity•   Curiosity•   Lo...
STRENGTHS OF          COURAGE• Those related to  maintaining will-power in  the face of opposition• Bravery• Persistence• ...
STRENGTHS OF         JUSTICE• Those that support the  best possible  interaction among a  group• Citizenship• Fairness• Em...
STRENGTHS OF         TEMPERANCE• Those that protect from  excess• Forgiveness & Mercy• Modesty & Humility• Prudence• Self-...
STRENGTHS OF             TRANSCENDENCE• Those that form  connections with a larger  whole•   Appreciation of Excellence & ...
Stop & Think       IDENTIFY YOUR         STRENGTHS• Split into pairs & help  each other to identify  their strengths• Each...
EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE• The capacity for recognizing our own  emotions and those of others, for motivating  ourselves and ...
Self-                              Social   Awareness                           AwarenessReading one’s own emotionsand rec...
THE BUSINESS CASE   DOES EI MAKE   A DIFFERENCE?
RESEARCHGoleman, Working with Emotional Intelligence, “181 different positions from 121 organizations worldwide … 67% of t...
HOW GROUP EIAFFECTS THE BOTTOM      LINE              Better Decisions, More Creative Solutions, Higher Productivity      ...
WHAT IS GROUPEI?• It is not about…   • It is about . . .  catching and         bringing emotions to  suppressing          ...
EI COMPETENCIES(Goleman, 2001) Self-Awareness                 Social-Awareness                                • Empathy • ...
Stop & ThinkBEST TEAM & WORST  TEAM EXERCISEs Think of a team you have been a part of that was  an excellent experience. T...
TOP TEN EMOTIONAL     NEEDS OF CHILDREN•   1. Accepted•   2. Believed in•   3. Cared about•   4. Forgiven•   5. Loved•   6...
ADULTS NEED TO FEEL:•   accepted               •   in control    acknowledged               included    admired           ...
DEVELOPING EI• If you are interested in developing your  emotional intelligence, you should start by  identifying where it...
DEVELOPING EI• Think critically of your actions in the workplace.• Do you constantly seek attention and approval for a  jo...
DEVELOPING EI• Closely examine how it is that you react  when you are placed in a stressful situation.• If you become over...
DEVELOPING EI• Another way to work on developing  emotional intelligence is to take  responsibility for your own actions.•...
EMOTIONAL    INTELLIGENCE &      LEADERSHIP• Emotional Intelligence and leadership both rely  on self awareness.• Self-Awa...
EMOTIONAL    INTELLIGENCE &      LEADERSHIP• Any effective leader should be sure not to let  their mood and emotions affec...
EMOTIONAL    INTELLIGENCE &      LEADERSHIP• Leaders possessing emotional intelligence are  motivated by setting and meeti...
Stop & ThinkREADING OTHERS EMOTIONS
FEAR•   We express fear when we feel    physically or psychologically    threatened.    The facial expression of fear is  ...
HAPPINESS•   This is a classic display of a    genuine smile, called a Duchenne    smile, which signals happiness.    It’s...
ANGER•   You see these muscle movements    —in the lips, around the eyes, and    in the brow—when people are    feeling ag...
EMBARRASSMENT•   When people are embarrassed,    they avert their gaze, which    means they move their head    down and to...
PRIDE•   Pride involves signs of dominance.    The corners of the lips rise slightly,    signaling that the person is happ...
SURPRISE•   Surprise is often confused with fear.    But when we’re afraid, our lower    eyelids tighten and our eyebrows ...
CONTEMPT                                            ••   Contempt is when you look down    on somebody derisively or    su...
DISGUST•   When we feel disgust, the    muscles above the upper lip pull    up, raising the upper lip, wrinkling    the no...
FLIRTATIOUSNESS•   This is a coy, flirtatious smile. What    conveys flirtatiousness is when    someone turns his or her h...
PAIN•   When we feel pain, our facial    muscles move in ways that    contract the face and protect us    from harm. In th...
COMPASSION•   When people feel sympathy or    compassion, the corrugator    muscles pull the eyebrows in and    up, their ...
AMUSEMENT•   The tell-tale signs of genuine    amusement are the open mouth    and the backwards head    movement. And lik...
INTEREST•   When we’re interested in    something, the frontalis muscles    raise our eyebrows straight up,    and our lip...
SADNESS•   Sadness is characterized by    oblique eyebrows, where the    corrugator muscles pull the    eyebrows in, but t...
DESIREDesire is signaled through themouth, with lip bites, puckers, or (asin this case) lip licks. The mouth isprobably so...
SHAME•   Shame is a very simple display but    a powerful one. It simply involves    gaze aversion, with the head    movin...
POLITENESS• This is a non-Duchenne  smile—a smile that doesn’t  signal true happiness. It  suggests that the person is  tr...
EMBARRASSMENT•   With about 30 percent of    embarrassment episodes, people    touch their face, which is    happening her...
PAIN•   When we feel pain, our facial    muscles contract the face and    protect us from harm.    In the upper half of th...
LOVE• When we feel love, our facial  expression often resembles  happiness: The zygomatic  major muscle pulls the lip  cor...
EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCEMEASURABLE RESULTS• You are true to yourself & to others• You practice your beliefs & values• You in...
MEASURABLE         RESULTS• You are aware of your own strengths, & the  strengths of those you work with• You aim for succ...
MEASURABLE RESULTS• You are not afraid of criticism & do not react  emotionally to it• You never engage in office politics...
LEADERS OF         TOMMORROW• The new leaders of tommorrow are creative, visionary  & proactive• They are both learners & ...
LEADERS OF         TOMMORROW• Positions for change.   – Observes the environment.• Creates a new reality.   – Defines obje...
LEADERS OF            TOMMORROW• The leaders realises that with all the rapid changes  in the global marketplace & the inf...
EMOTIONALINTELLIGENCE   TEŞEKKÜR   EDERİMRichard Tredennick-TitchenCopyright 2011
Emotional intelligence
Emotional intelligence
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Emotional intelligence

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Emotional & social intelligence skills are now seen as vital to the development of authentic leadership characteristics

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  • What do you see here. Self awareness is the bedrock.
  • This model is based on our research and summarizes how emotional intelligence leads to more effective teams. Here you see that there are two levels of emergent properties GEI leads to social capital (the value added by the structure and quality of social relationships) Social capital in turn facilitates effective task processes where people are engaged, are participating, cooperate, etc. This then leads to team effectiveness
  • The Self-Awareness Cluster: Emotional Self-Awareness: recognizing our emotions and their effects Accurate Self-Assessment: knowing one’s strengths and limits Self-Confidence: a strong sense of one’s self worth and capabilities The Self-Management Cluster: Adaptability: flexibility in dealing with changing situations or obstacles Self-Control: inhibiting emotions in service of group or organizational norms Conscientiousness: reliability, attention to detail Initiative: proactive, bias toward action Achievement Orientation: striving to do better Trustworthiness: integrity or consistency with one’s values, emotions, and behavior Social Awareness Cluster: Empathy: understanding others and taking active interest in their concern Service Orientation: recognizing and meeting customer’s needs Organizational Awareness: perceives political relationships within the organization Social skills / Relationship Management Cluster: Leadership: inspiring and guiding groups and people Developing Others: helping others improve performance Change Catalyst: initiating or managing change Conflict Management: resolving disagreements Influence: getting others to agree with you Building bonds: building relationships Communication: sending clear and convincing messages Teamwork: creating a shared vision and synergy in team work
  • What was the mood in the team?
  • Emotional intelligence

    1. 1. THE IMPORTANCE OF DEVELOPING EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCEA VITALLEADERSHIP QUALITY“Emotional Intelligence is the key to happiness & success in every aspect of your life”Richard Tredennick-TitchenCopyright 2011 Turkey
    2. 2. WELCOME TO AGORA © “AWARENESS” Copyright: Richard Tredennick-Titchen 2011
    3. 3. AGORAAGORA asks you to dig out what is already insideyou, examine it, and decide what action you need totake, in order to change & exploit your full potentialfor, happiness & success
    4. 4. Stop & Think• Cross out six letters from the line so that BSAINXLEATNTEARS all the remaining letters in the sequence for one common English word
    5. 5. THE ICEBERGHOW MUCH DO YOU SEE OF AN ICEBERG?
    6. 6. THE ICEBERG ONLY 10% OF ANY ICEBERG IS VISIBLE THE REMAINING 90% IS BELOW SEA LEVEL
    7. 7. IQ & EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE
    8. 8. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE• The most successful people in business have high EQ’s• EQ enables you to have the self confidence to know your strengths & weaknesses & to understand other’s strengths & weaknesses• Developing your EQ will enable you to conquer fear & anxiety, & lead a richer & more successful life EQ is defined as awareness of your own & other’s beliefs, values & emotions
    9. 9. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE• Emotionally intelligent people have a high level of self-confidence & self-esteem• They can accept criticism without feeling hurt or threatened• They are generally more succesful in their personal relationships, as well as their working lives• They know where they want to go & how to get there
    10. 10. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE• Emotionally intelligent people are in control of their emotions• They are able to manage themselves, as well as others• They have a positive attitude to life, and are constantly learning new ways to do things• Their attitude to everything in life is based on a mature belief system
    11. 11. HOW MUCH DO OTHERS SEE OF YOU KNOWN KNOWLEDGETO OTHERS SKILLS SEA LEVELUNKNOWNTO OTHERS ATTITUDE
    12. 12. BENEATH THE SURFACE KNOWN KNOWLEDGETO OTHERS SKILLS SEA LEVELUNKNOWNTO OTHERS PERSONALITY,MOTIVATION, GENES,EXPERIENCES,VALUES THOUGHTS, FEELINGS...
    13. 13. YOU ARE JUDGED BY YOUR “BEHAVIOUR” KNOWNTO OTHERS BEHAVIOR SEA LEVELUNKNOWNTO OTHERS VALUES – STANDARDS – JUDGMENTS ATTITUDE MOTIVES – ETHICS - BELIEFS
    14. 14. SELF-AWARENESS1. EMOTIONAL AWARENESS b. Know which emotions Individuals with this they are feeling & why competence ... c. Realize the links between their feelings & what they think, do & say d. Recognise how their feelings affect their performance e. Have a guiding awareness of their values & goals
    15. 15. SELF-AWARENESS2. ACCURATE SELF-ASSESSMENT b. Aware of their strengths & weaknessesIndividuals with thiscompetence are ... c. Learn from experience d. Open to feedback, continuous learning & self development e. Able to show a sense of humour & perspective about themselves
    16. 16. SELF-AWARENESS3. SELF-CONFIDENCE b. Present themselves with self-assurance Individuals with this c. Can voice unpopular competence ... views in order to do what is right d. Are decisive & able to make sound decisions despite uncertainties & pressures
    17. 17. SELF-REGULATION• SELF-CONTROL a. Manage their impulsive & distressing feelingsIndividuals with this well competence ... b. Stay calm & positive in a crisis c. Think clearly & stay focussed under pressure
    18. 18. SELF-REGULATION2. TRUSTWORTHINESS b. Act ethically at all times c. Build trust through their reliability & authenticityIndividuals with this competence ... d. Admit their own mistakes & confront un-ethical behaviour in others e. Take tough decisions even if they are unpopular
    19. 19. SELF-REGULATION3. CONSCIENTIOUSNESS b. Meet commitments & keep promises c. Hold themselvesIndividuals with this accountable for competence ... meeting their objectives d. Are organised & careful in their work
    20. 20. SELF-REGULATION4. ADAPTABILITY b. Smoothly handle multiple demands, shifting priorities &Individuals with this rapid change competence ... c. Adapt their rsponses & tactics to meet fluid circumstances d. Are flexible in how they see & respond to events
    21. 21. SELF-REGULATION5. INNOVATIVENESS b. Seek out fresh ideas from a wide variety of sourcesIndividuals with this c. Entertain original competence ... solutions to problems d. Generate new ideas e. Take fresh perspectives & risks in their thinking
    22. 22. SELF-MOTIVATION1. ACHIEVEMENT DRIVE a. Are results orientated with a high drive to meet their objectivesIndividuals with this & standards competence ... b. Set challenging goals & take calculated risks c. Pursue data & information to reduce uncertainty & find ways to do better d. Learn how to improve their performance
    23. 23. SELF-MOTIVATION2. COMMITMENT b. Readily make personal or group sacrifices to meet aIndividuals with this larger organisational goal competence ... c. Find a sense of purpose in the larger mission d. Use the group’s core values in making making decisions & clarifying choices e. Actively seek out opportunities to fulfil the group’s mission
    24. 24. SELF-MOTIVATION3. INITIATIVE a. Are ready to seize opportunities b. Pursue goals beyondIndividuals with this what is expected or competence ... required of them c. Cut through ‘red tape’ in order to get the job done d. Mobilise others through unusual, enterprising efforts
    25. 25. SELF-MOTIVATION4. OPTIMISM b. Persist in attaining goals despite obstacles &Individuals with this setbacks competence ... c. Operate from ‘hope of success’, rather than ‘fear of failure’ d. See setbacks as manageable circumstances – not personal flaw
    26. 26. SOCIAL-AWARENESS1. EMPATHY c. Are attentive to emotionalIndividuals with this cues & listen well competence ... d. Show sensitivity & understand other people’s perspectives e. Help out based on other peoples needs & feelings
    27. 27. SELF-MOTIVATION2. DEVELOPING OTHERS b. Acknowledge & reward other peoples strengths, achievements &Individuals with this competence ... development c. Offer useful feed back & identify peoples needs for development d. Mentor, give timely coaching & offer assignments that challenge & grow a person’s skills
    28. 28. SELF-MOTIVATION3. LEVERAGING DIVERSITY b. Respect & relate well to people from varied backgrounds c. Understand diverseIndividuals with this world views & are competence ... sensitive to cultural differences d. Challenge bias & intolerance
    29. 29. Stop & Think KEY THINKERS• “If your emotional abilities aren’t in hand, if you don’t have self-awareness, if you are not able to manage your distressing emotions, if you can’t have empathy and have effective relationships, then no matter how smart you are, you are not going to get very far” Daniel Goleman
    30. 30. Stop & Think IDENTIFY YOUR STRENGTHS• We all have strengths & weaknesses• What is important are our strengths
    31. 31. STRENGTHS OF HUMANITY• Those centered around relationships with others• The capacity to love & recieve love• Kindness• Social intelligence
    32. 32. STRENGTHS OF KNOWLEDGE• Those related to aquiring & using new knowledge• Creativity• Curiosity• Love of Learning• Perspective• Wisdom
    33. 33. STRENGTHS OF COURAGE• Those related to maintaining will-power in the face of opposition• Bravery• Persistence• Integrity• Vitality
    34. 34. STRENGTHS OF JUSTICE• Those that support the best possible interaction among a group• Citizenship• Fairness• Empathy
    35. 35. STRENGTHS OF TEMPERANCE• Those that protect from excess• Forgiveness & Mercy• Modesty & Humility• Prudence• Self-regulation
    36. 36. STRENGTHS OF TRANSCENDENCE• Those that form connections with a larger whole• Appreciation of Excellence & Beauty• Gratitude• Hope• Humour• Spirituality
    37. 37. Stop & Think IDENTIFY YOUR STRENGTHS• Split into pairs & help each other to identify their strengths• Each person should identify at least 3 core strengths
    38. 38. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE• The capacity for recognizing our own emotions and those of others, for motivating ourselves and others, and for managing emotions well in ourselves and in our relationships• In sum: – Understanding Yourself – Managing Yourself – Understanding Others – Managing Others
    39. 39. Self- Social Awareness AwarenessReading one’s own emotionsand recognizing their impact Ability to attune to how others feel, and to “read” situations Self- Management Social SkillsKeeping disruptive emotions & impulses under control Ability to guide the emotional tone of the group
    40. 40. THE BUSINESS CASE DOES EI MAKE A DIFFERENCE?
    41. 41. RESEARCHGoleman, Working with Emotional Intelligence, “181 different positions from 121 organizations worldwide … 67% of the abilities deemed essential for effective performance were emotional competencies” (cf. Rosier, 1994) “Reanalyzed data from 40 different corporations … to differentiate star performers from average ones … emotional competencies were found to be twice as important in contributing to excellence as pure intellect and expertise” (cf. Jacobs and Chen, 1997)
    42. 42. HOW GROUP EIAFFECTS THE BOTTOM LINE Better Decisions, More Creative Solutions, Higher Productivity Participation, Cooperation, Collaboration Trust, Group Identity, Group Efficacy, NetworksGroup Emotional Intelligence
    43. 43. WHAT IS GROUPEI?• It is not about… • It is about . . . catching and bringing emotions to suppressing the surface and emotions as they proactively bubble up understanding their• It is not about… meaning and impact being nice on the team and its performance
    44. 44. EI COMPETENCIES(Goleman, 2001) Self-Awareness Social-Awareness • Empathy • Emotional awareness • Service Orientation • Accurate self-assessment • • Organizational awareness Self-confidence Self-Management Social skills • Leadership • Adaptability • Develop others • Self-control • Change catalyst • Conscientiousness • Conflict management • Initiative • • Influence Achievement Orientation • Trustworthiness • Building bonds • Communication • Teamwork
    45. 45. Stop & ThinkBEST TEAM & WORST TEAM EXERCISEs Think of a team you have been a part of that was an excellent experience. The team performed well. It was the best team experience you’ve ever had. Think ofawful experience. beenteam performed was an a team you have The a part of that poorly. The worst team experience you’ve ever had. Underneaththe characteristicswrite notes describing each team name, or circumstances that contributed to that experience.
    46. 46. TOP TEN EMOTIONAL NEEDS OF CHILDREN• 1. Accepted• 2. Believed in• 3. Cared about• 4. Forgiven• 5. Loved• 6. Safe• 7. Supported• 8. Trusted• 9. Understood• 10. Valued
    47. 47. ADULTS NEED TO FEEL:• accepted • in control acknowledged included admired listened to appreciated loved approved of needed believed in noticed capable powerful cared about private challenged productive / useful clear (not confused) reassured competent recognized confident respected forgiven safe / secure forgiving supported free treated fairly fulfilled trusted heard understanding helped understood helpful valued important worthy
    48. 48. DEVELOPING EI• If you are interested in developing your emotional intelligence, you should start by identifying where it is that you are currently and where you would like to be.• Start observing how it is that you react to others. Look honestly at how you think and interact with other people.• If you find that you are quick to harshly judge or stereotype others, take some time to put yourself in their shoes and this should help you to be more open and accepting of their individual needs and views.
    49. 49. DEVELOPING EI• Think critically of your actions in the workplace.• Do you constantly seek attention and approval for a job well done?• Try to practice being a bit more humble. This sends across the message that you are strong and confident.• Instead of always trying to have the focus be all on you, try giving others an equal opportunity to shine.• It is much better to give praise than to only receive it.
    50. 50. DEVELOPING EI• Closely examine how it is that you react when you are placed in a stressful situation.• If you become overly upset, lash out, or try to place the blame all on others, you may need to work on developing emotional intelligence.• Being able to remain calm and maintain personal control in difficult situations is a highly valued character both in the business world and outside of it.
    51. 51. DEVELOPING EI• Another way to work on developing emotional intelligence is to take responsibility for your own actions.• When you do something wrong and upset someone, do not try to avoid the situation and sweep it under the rug.• Instead you should approach them directly and offer an apology.• This will make people want to work with you more.
    52. 52. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE & LEADERSHIP• Emotional Intelligence and leadership both rely on self awareness.• Self-Awareness is mostly about being able to effectively recognize and understand your own emotions, moods, and values.• As a leader you should recognize that these aspects of your self have a great impact on those around you.• A leader with strong emotional intelligence is self aware and is both confident and realistic about their personal strengths and opportunities and uses them to inspire those around them.
    53. 53. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE & LEADERSHIP• Any effective leader should be sure not to let their mood and emotions affect others around them.• With emotional intelligence you will be able to develop self-regulation skills.• Leaders with high Emotional Intelligence levels have the ability to control their emotions and to think about the consequences of their actions before acting.• They are not easily flustered and are comfortable with new projects and deal well with change.
    54. 54. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE & LEADERSHIP• Leaders possessing emotional intelligence are motivated by setting and meeting their own personal goals.• For them it is not about the money or the recognition. It is simply about getting the job done.• While they are often persistent in achieving these goals, at the same time they do not ignore the emotional needs of those around them.• They tend to show strong empathy for others and take the feelings and needs of others into consideration during their daily interactions.
    55. 55. Stop & ThinkREADING OTHERS EMOTIONS
    56. 56. FEAR• We express fear when we feel physically or psychologically threatened. The facial expression of fear is often confused with surprise. But when we’re surprised, our eyes open wider than when we’re afraid, and our mouth isn’t pulled sideways, like it is here; instead, our jaw drops and the mouth hangs open. Plus, our eyebrows are relatively flat when we’re afraid; they arch more when we’re surprised.
    57. 57. HAPPINESS• This is a classic display of a genuine smile, called a Duchenne smile, which signals happiness. It’s defined by two muscle movements. The movement common to all smiles is the zygomatic major muscle pulling the lip corners up. But, critically, what reveals this as a genuine smile is what happens around the eyes: The muscles tighten, making those wrinkles, or crow’s feet, around the sides of the eyes and creating that pouching of the lower eyelid. When you see these signs, the person isn’t just smiling politely; he’s feeling genuine happiness.
    58. 58. ANGER• You see these muscle movements —in the lips, around the eyes, and in the brow—when people are feeling aggressive, threatened, or frustrated. Researchers think we make this expression when were angry because it could protect the face in a physical conflict—for example, the furrowed eyebrows could protect the eyes. People often confuse anger and disgust, but disgust involves a raised upper lip and a wrinkle in the nose that you don’t see here.
    59. 59. EMBARRASSMENT• When people are embarrassed, they avert their gaze, which means they move their head down and to the side, exposing their neck. And the embarrassed smile is different from other smiles: The lips press together tightly, reflecting feelings of restraint or inhibition. Embarrassment can look like shame, but when were ashamed, our head moves straight down, not to the side, and we dont smile.
    60. 60. PRIDE• Pride involves signs of dominance. The corners of the lips rise slightly, signaling that the person is happy. But what distinguishes this from happiness is that the head tilts back, with a slight jaw-thrust. Those are classic signs of power and dominance—they suggest that we’re feeling strong. The expression of pride is also close to the expression of contempt. They both involve a backward head tilt, but contempt doesnt involve a slight smile like pride does; instead, with contempt the lip movement is asymmetrical— only one side tightens.
    61. 61. SURPRISE• Surprise is often confused with fear. But when we’re afraid, our lower eyelids tighten and our eyebrows look flat and tense; with surprise, our upper eyelids rise up and our eyebrows arch. Also, our jaws drop when we’re surprised, but our lip corners go sideways when we’re afraid, making the mouth look tighter. Some experts believe our eyes open wide like this because when we’re confronted with something surprising—a long-lost friend, an unexpected award—we try to absorb as much of this new information as possible.
    62. 62. CONTEMPT •• Contempt is when you look down on somebody derisively or suspiciously. What’s important about the expression of contempt is that the lips tighten on one side of the face but not the other. If the tightening were on both sides of the face, the person could be swallowing or salivating. People often confuse contempt with disgust. But disgust involves the raising of the upper lip, and the bridge of the nose wrinkles. We express disgust about noxious things, not those about which we’re derisive or suspicious.
    63. 63. DISGUST• When we feel disgust, the muscles above the upper lip pull up, raising the upper lip, wrinkling the nose, and narrowing the eyes. People often confuse disgust and anger. But anger tightens the mouth and lowers the eyebrows more significantly, and raises the upper eyelid. With disgust, the mouth opens and the tongue comes out, just in case you need to throw up.
    64. 64. FLIRTATIOUSNESS• This is a coy, flirtatious smile. What conveys flirtatiousness is when someone turns his or her head away to signal ‘I’m not interested in you,’ but simultaneously makes eye contact. That’s a universal display that reflects the ambivalence of flirtation—the flirter avoids and approaches someone at the same time. Someone flirting gives off signals of pleasure, as indicated by the zygomatic major muscle pulling the lip corners up, which also raises the cheeks slightly. Plus, the eyes are narrower than in a neutral state because the orbicularis oculi muscles around the eyes contract, suggesting feelings of happiness.
    65. 65. PAIN• When we feel pain, our facial muscles move in ways that contract the face and protect us from harm. In the upper half of the face, the orbicularis oculi muscles around the eyes contract, closing the eyes tightly, and the corrugator muscle lowers our eyebrows. In the lower half of the face, our lips tighten and press upwards. Youll see this particular expression especially when people are experiencing psychological pain, such as when they see other people suffer. It’s an expression closely related to sadness. But rather than suffering in their own sadness, they experience the pain and suffering of others through empathy.
    66. 66. COMPASSION• When people feel sympathy or compassion, the corrugator muscles pull the eyebrows in and up, their lips press together, and their head tilts forward slightly—a sign of social engagement. The expression of compassion is most often confused with sadness. The eyebrow movements are similar in sadness and compassion, but with compassion the lips press together; when we feel sad, our lips pull down.
    67. 67. AMUSEMENT• The tell-tale signs of genuine amusement are the open mouth and the backwards head movement. And like a genuine smile, you can tell a genuine laugh when you see the muscles contracting around the eyes, making crow’s feet. Genuine laughter often relaxes all muscle movements in the body because of shifts in our respiration patterns that happen when we laugh. This rapid shift to a state of relaxation shuts off feelings of aggression or frustration—we’re cooperating with other people, not competing.
    68. 68. INTEREST• When we’re interested in something, the frontalis muscles raise our eyebrows straight up, and our lip corners turn up in a slight smile, suggesting we’re feeling pleasure. The expression of interest is related to the expression of happiness. But when we’re happy, we’ll show more exaggerated upward movements of our lip corners, and the muscles around the eyes will contract more, without the eyebrow raising straight up.
    69. 69. SADNESS• Sadness is characterized by oblique eyebrows, where the corrugator muscles pull the eyebrows in, but the inner part of the frontalis muscle pulls them up. There’s also a little pouching in the inner part of the forehead, and people will often look down. Plus, the corners of the lips are pulled straight down, giving the mouth a curved look. The expression of sadness is often confused with shame, and it shares the oblique eyebrow muscle movements of compassion.
    70. 70. DESIREDesire is signaled through themouth, with lip bites, puckers, or (asin this case) lip licks. The mouth isprobably so strongly linked to desirebecause of the connection to kissing.People often make this facialexpression when they’re interestedin someone else sexually, but notnecessarily romantically.Desire is obviously a relative of love,but when people feel loving andtrusting and devoted to someoneelse, as opposed to sexuallyaroused, they wont necessarilymake this kind of gesture with theirmouth. Instead, theyll often smile ina way that suggests happiness, witha head tilt to the side.
    71. 71. SHAME• Shame is a very simple display but a powerful one. It simply involves gaze aversion, with the head moving down so that the chin tucks into the neck. Its the opposite of pride: Whereas with pride our head tilts back and our chin goes up, shame often constricts our posture as a sign of submissiveness. This expression is frequently confused with sadness. But shame doesnt involve the muscle movements of the sad face—the eyebrows pulled in and partly up, with the lip corners moving down.
    72. 72. POLITENESS• This is a non-Duchenne smile—a smile that doesn’t signal true happiness. It suggests that the person is trying to seem polite and cooperative, but they don’t genuinely feel happy. The zygomatic major muscle is pulling the lip corners up, but there are no signs of real joy around the eyes—no crow’s feet around the sides, no pouching of the lower eyelid, no raising of the cheek.
    73. 73. EMBARRASSMENT• With about 30 percent of embarrassment episodes, people touch their face, which is happening here. Some experts believe the face touch is a defensive movement, to protect the face after the person violated some social rule. In some parts of the world, people make a similar hand gesture when they’re ashamed. But with shame, the head moves straight down, not to the side, and there’s no slight smile.
    74. 74. PAIN• When we feel pain, our facial muscles contract the face and protect us from harm. In the upper half of the face, the orbicularis oculi muscles around the eyes contract, closing the eyes tightly, and the corrugator muscle lowers our eyebrows. In the lower half of the face, our lips tighten and press upwards. Especially when experiencing physical pain, people will sometimes contract their neck, as is happening here, making this look even more like a display of self-defense.
    75. 75. LOVE• When we feel love, our facial expression often resembles happiness: The zygomatic major muscle pulls the lip corners up, and there’s a tightening of the lower eyelid. But the distinct expression of love combines these muscle movements with a tilt of the head to the side. That’s a sign of intimacy and connection beyond just happiness.
    76. 76. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCEMEASURABLE RESULTS• You are true to yourself & to others• You practice your beliefs & values• You inspire through your commitment to excellence• You empower, develop & respect others• You never accept mediocrity or second best• You have courage to take risks & do what is right• You excercise integrity & honesty at all times• You take unconditional responsibility for yourself• You demonstrate initiative & innovation
    77. 77. MEASURABLE RESULTS• You are aware of your own strengths, & the strengths of those you work with• You aim for success in everything that you do• You learn from the past, plan for the future, but live in the present• You are passionate about what you do, and you communicate this passion to those around you• You are the same person in every aspect of your life• You find happiness in “flow”
    78. 78. MEASURABLE RESULTS• You are not afraid of criticism & do not react emotionally to it• You never engage in office politics, or talk about people behind their backs• You act calmly & rationally, even when you are in a crisis• You support & encourage your team at all times, through giving regular feedback & guidance• You are as aware of the needs of others, as you are of your own needs• You never play the blame game• You successfully ‘manage’ yourself & your emotions
    79. 79. LEADERS OF TOMMORROW• The new leaders of tommorrow are creative, visionary & proactive• They are both learners & teachers• They foresee dynamic changes in society and the marketplace, & capitalise on them• They have a strong sense of ethics & purpose• They work to build a sense of integrity into their organisations & develop their staff• They have self-assurance & self-confidence, built on their self-knowledge & emotional intelligence
    80. 80. LEADERS OF TOMMORROW• Positions for change. – Observes the environment.• Creates a new reality. – Defines objectives, resources and strategies.• Leads diverse teams to create. – Selects people and defines expectations.• Drives the performance in creation. – Motivates people and amplifies results.• Searches for excellence at every step. – Monitors and evaluates self, team and environment.
    81. 81. LEADERS OF TOMMORROW• The leaders realises that with all the rapid changes in the global marketplace & the information overload, it is simply impossible to know everything• They realise that reason & logic will not get them through every situation• They are increasingly realising that there is value in listening to their intuition & ‘gut’ reactions, when making important decisions• They also realise that the more self-aware they are, the more they can trust their basic intuition
    82. 82. EMOTIONALINTELLIGENCE TEŞEKKÜR EDERİMRichard Tredennick-TitchenCopyright 2011

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