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AIA, CPHC, LEED AP BD+C
129 Sawkill Avenue
Milford PA 18337
Office 570 296 0466
Mobile ...
First Floor
0' - 0"
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10' - 0"
Roof
18' - 0"
Garden Level
-9' - 0"
78910 611
45 SF
Mud Room
3
37 SF
Bath 1
10
1...
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AIA, CPHC, LEED AP BD+C
129 Sawkill Avenue
Milford PA 18337
Office 570 296 0466
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WHEELER
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Lands of Christie P. Karpiak and Dec...
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16' - 6 1/2" 3' - 6" 12' - 8 1/2"
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274 SF
Work Room
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228 S...
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8'-0"8'-0"8'-0"8'-0"8'-0"
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A71
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12' - 5 1/4" 0' - 4 1/2" 7' - 5 1/2" 0' - 6 1/2" 4' - 1 3/4" ...
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Z15
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Date
Drawn by
AIA, CPHC, LEED AP BD+C
129 Sawkill ...
First Floor
0' - 0"
Second Floor
10' - 0"
Roof
18' - 0"
Garden Level
-9' - 0"
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1
Z15
11 12
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321
1
1
A11
Meta...
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A10
1 2 3 4 5
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17 19 20 21
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21 22
2...
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78910 611
22
10 4
2
Intus windows
Reverse board
and batten siding
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7 8 9 106 11
15 16
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Opional roof
mounted PV...
Scale
Project number
Date
Drawn by
AIA, CPHC, LEED AP BD+C
129 Sawkill Avenue
Milford PA 18337
Office 570 296 0466
Mobile ...
7
Paintyed gypsum wallboard
Inside Wall - 2 x 4 @ 24" O.C.
Air Control Layer
5/8" OSB sheathing
All seams primed, caulked,...
Scale
Project number
Date
Drawn by
AIA, CPHC, LEED AP BD+C
129 Sawkill Avenue
Milford PA 18337
Office 570 296 0466
Mobile ...
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Karpiak Mulhall Passive House

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A new residence in Scranton, PA designed to meet the Passive House standard.

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Karpiak Mulhall Passive House

  1. 1. Scale Project number Date Drawn by AIA, CPHC, LEED AP BD+C 129 Sawkill Avenue Milford PA 18337 Office 570 296 0466 Mobile 267 294 9818 richard@richardpedranti.com KARPIAK/MULHALLRESIDENCE 1700PineStreetScranton,PA18510 SCHEMATIC DESIGN DOCUMENTS NewresidencedesignedtomeetthePassiveHouseStandard Richard Pedranti is a Certified Passive House Consultant (CPHC) through the Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) RICHARD PEDRANTI ARCHITECT P A S S I V E H O U S E 9/25/201210:29:04AM A0 PH1 Passive House Information 12-6 Karpiak / Mulhall September 21, 2012 RBP Buildings that meet the Passive House standard use 80% less energy than conventional buildings. A Passive House conserves energy by creating a virtually air-tight, super insulated, compact building envelope that uses the sun and internal gains to achieve space conditioning. A heat recovery ventilator (HRV) is used to condition extract air and provide superior indoor air quality. A Passive House can achieve Zero Energy Building (ZEB) standard with the use of a small renewable energy system. Benefits of a Passive House Extremely Low Energy Use Up to 90% less heating/cooling energy use, 60-80% overall energy savings. High Quality Indoor Air Controlled ventilation for a continuous, consistent supply of filtered fresh air. Comfortable Indoor Temperatures Passive House buildings are designed to easily maintain a steady, comfortable temperature without irritating temperature swings common in drafty buildings. Operational and Construction Savings The durable and tight building shell reduces maintenance over the life of the building while vastly reducing energy bills and alows for the elimination of a conventional HVAC system. With the greatly reduced energy requirements, the Passive House approach is the best start to achieve a net-zero energy building. Proven Sustainability Certified Passive House buildings have been constructed in the United States from Minnesota to Louisiana, from Maine to California. Globally, more than 20,000+ buildings have been constructed using Passive House principles, some zero and even net-positive energy buildings. In fact, the standard is so beneficial; many European countries have already or are in process of adopting it in their building codes. Helping the Earth With buildings contributing as much 47 percent of all greenhouse gases, Passive Houses are exponentially friendlier to the environment because of their minimal energy and fossil fuel consumption. They also consider the C02 contributions to global warming and embodied energy characteristics of all its selected building materials. You don’t have to wait 18 years; Passive Houses can meet the Architecture2030 challenge, today! “Doing more, with less” to maximize the success of our local and now global communities while simultaneously improving our role as stewards of the earth, is the underlying spirit of the Passive House movement. Design Strategies of a Passive House “Maximize your gains, minimize your losses”. These are the basic tenants of the Passive House approach. A Passive House project maximizes the energy efficiency of the basic building components inherent in all buildings; roof, walls, windows, floors and the utility systems: electrical, plumbing & mechanical. By minimizing a building's energy losses, the mechanical system is not called to replenish the losses nearly as frequently, saving resources, operational costs and pollution. Unlike any other structures, Passive House buildings maintain occupant comfort for more hours of the year without the need for mechanical temperature conditioning of the indoor air. The opposite has been the norm in this country with a history of inexpensive fuel and construction techniques with little consideration for energy losses through thermal bridging, air-infiltration, let alone being conscious of using some or even any insulation. The Passive House approach focuses on the following: Strategic Design and Planning Passive House projects are carefully modeled and evaluated for efficiency at the design stage. Certified Passive House Consultants (CPHC) are trained to use the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP), a tool that allows designers to test “what-if” scenarios before construction begins. They are also trained to use other software tools to identify and address potential thermal bridges and moisture issues at the design stage. Specific Climate, Siting and Sizing Passive House design uses detailed, specific annual weather data in modeling a structure’s performance. Orientation of the windows can maximize or minimize solar gain and shading. Passive House theory leans towards minimizing the surface area to interior volume ratio, favoring an efficient shape to minimize energy losses. Efficient Systems Through fitting buildings designed to the Passive House Standard with efficient appliances, hot water distribution, and energy efficient lighting, electricity consumption is also slashed by 50% compared to the average housing stock, without any loss of convenience. Most Passive House residential ventilation systems, for instance, are typically driven by a highly efficient motor only consuming 40w. Alternative Energy The significant reduction in energy use, allows alternative energy to power a greater percentage of a buildings demands. Likewise smaller demand equates to smaller and more affordable alternative energy systems providing higher cost-benefit value. Passive House design puts a project within reach for achieving true “Net Zero” performance (the building generates as much energy as it uses). Performance Criteria & Certification Performance Criteria 1. Maximum Heating or Cooling Energy: 4.750 kBtu/ft2 per year 2. Maximum Total Source Energy: 38 kBtu/ft2 per year (“Source Energy” by definition includes the energy required to produce and deliver the energy to the site, and can be offset with solar thermal and other measures. Photovoltaics cannot be used to offset this energy, but are recognized, at this time.) 3. Maximum Air Leakage: 0.6 ACH @ 50 Pa < 0.6 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals (ACH50) In addition, the following are recommendations which vary based on specific climate region: • Window u-value ≤ 0.14 Btu/hr-ft2-°F (0.8 W/m2/K) • Ventilation system with heat recovery with ≥ 75% efficiency with low electric consumption @ 0.68 W/cfm/ft3 (0.45 Wh/m3) • Thermal bridge free construction ≤ 0.006 Btu/hr-ft-°F (0.01 W/mK) Verification/Certification Passive House performance is verified by review of the data in the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) energy model, a third party verified blower door test, a formal record of adjustment of the ventilation system, a declaration by the construction supervisor, and photographic documentation. History The roots of Passive House trace back to the 1970s, when the concepts of superinsulation and passive solar management techniques were developed in the United States and Canada. In the 1990s European scientists refined and augmented these concepts to develop the Passive House standard and design techniques, which were tailored to the Central European climate zone. German-born architect Katrin Klingenberg studied with Dr. Wolfgang Feist, a German Passive House pioneer, in Darmstadt, Germany. She also studied in the United States at Ball State University and believed that Passive House could work and thrive in the United States. She provided a proof of concept by building her own Passive House in Urbana, Ill., in 2003. The single-family two-story was the first Passive House building in the United States. Klingenberg collaborated with construction manager Mike Kernagis to build, in partnership with the City of Urbana, Ill., several affordable housing Passive Houses. In 2007 they founded the Passive House Institute US (PHIUS). Since then PHIUS has trained and certified hundreds of Certified Passive House professionals The development of Passive House in the North America has grown exponentially since, with upwards of 100 projects completed in 2011 and many more in process. These professionals have accumulated an invaluable body of real world experience, adapting Passive House principles to meet the challenges of North America's widely varied and extreme climate zones. Much of the information contained on this page is adopted from the Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) and Passive House Alliance US (PHAUS) websites. By completing the rigorous and technical Passive House certification training and exam, Richard Pedranti has made a commitment to working with the most agreesive low energy building standard in the world. Advanced Windows and Doors Historically these items are the weak link of a building’s envelope and thermal defense system. Passive House places significant emphasis on specifying high performance windows and doors to address this concern. To meet the high performance needs of various climate zones, windows must meet strict performance standards regarding: component insulation, air tightness, installation and solar heat gain values. Energy Recovery Ventilation The “lungs” of a Passive House come from a box called a heat (or energy) recovery ventilator (HRV/ERV). It provides a constant supply of tempered, filtered fresh air 24/7 and saves money by recycling the indoor energy that is typically found in exhaust air. The heat from outgoing stale air is transferred to the unconditioned incoming fresh air, while it is being filtered. It provides a huge upgrade in indoor air quality and consistent comfort, especially for people sensitive to material off-gassing, allergies and other air-borne irritants. Heating One of the best benefits to implementing Passive House design is the high performance shell and extremely low annual energy demand. This allows owners to save on operational costs as they can now significantly downsize a building’s mechanical system. Passive solar gains, plus heat from occupants and appliances supply most of the needed heat. Thus, Passive House design puts a project within reach for achieving true “Net Zero” performance (the building generates as much energy as it consumes over the course of a year), making use of alternative energy systems smaller thus more affordable and attainable. Super-Insulated Envelope To keep the heating/cooling in, wall assemblies require greater insulation values to “stop the conditioned air” from leaving. Walls are typically twice as thick as today’s standard construction, for good reason. Wall assemblies are analyzed to allow for proper water and moisture management to make a long lasting and an exceptionally healthy building. Thermal Bridge-Free Detailing Breaks in the insulation layer usually caused by structural elements and utility penetrations in the building envelope create a “thermal bridge,” allowing undesirable exterior temperatures to migrate to and “un-do” expensive interior conditioned air. Passive House design attempts to eliminate thermal bridges via progressive mindful architectural detailing. Air-Tight Envelope (But Diffusion Open) Anyone who has been in an older drafty home understands how stopping unconditioned air from squeezing to the inside, effects comfort and the efficiency of the mechanical system. Passive House takes great care in designing, constructing and testing the envelope for an industry-leading control of air leakage to the interior. Blower door testing is a mandatory technique in assuring high performance. Walls are designed to be virtually air tight, while allowing water vapors to dry out providing an excellent strategy to maintain a healthy environment. What is a Passive House?
  2. 2. First Floor 0' - 0" Second Floor 10' - 0" Roof 18' - 0" Garden Level -9' - 0" 78910 611 45 SF Mud Room 3 37 SF Bath 1 10 118 SF Hall 14 433 SF Living Room 4 55 SF Mechanical Room 15 22 SF Laundry Room 16 274 SF Work Room 1 Control Layers Legend 1. Thermal Control Layer 2. Water Control Layer 3. Vapor Control Layer 4. Air Control Layer 7 6 20 15 12 4 19 8 7 Passive House Building Enclosure Principles 1. Continuous insulation 2. Thermal bridge free construction 3. Compact building shape 4. Airtightness 5. Balanced ventilation 6. Optimized solar orientation and shading 7. Energy efficient appliances 8. User friendliness Thermal bridge free to 0.006 BTU/HRFT2F Energy recovery Ventilator (ERV) with ducted minisplit Fresh air supply Exhaust air Roof Assembly R = 85 +/- Wall Assembly R = 71 Slab Assembly R = 45 Optional roof mounted PV system Wall Assembly Double 2x4 walls @ 24" O.C. with Gypbd wall finish 3 1/2" rock wool batts 1/2" OSB caulked and taped - air seal 16" dense pack cellulose 1/2" celotex fiberboard Tyvek 3/4" furring Reverse board and batten Triple pane Intus casement windows U = .15 Roof Assembly Raised heel wood truss with Gypbd ceiling finish 3 1/2" rock wool batts 1/2" OSB caulked and taped - air seal wood truss Blown in cellulose isulation Roof sheathing Tyvek 3/4" furring Metal roof Exposed framing at porch Solar shading Grade Air Tightness Minimum 0.6ACH @ 50Pa Foundation Wal Assembly ICF with Gypbd wall finish 3 1/2" rock wool batts in 2x4 cavity Taped polyethylene - air seal 2 3/4" ICF 8" poured concrete 2 3/4" ICF Drainaige plane Waterproofing Foundation Assembly R = 50 +/- Entrance door EPS frost skirt EPS frost skirt Slab Assembly 4" Reinforced concrete floor finish Taped polyethylene water and vapor barrier 12" rigid under slab insulation Crushed gravel SOUTH NORTH Applied overhang 2' - 0" 8 / 12 All control layers are to be continuous Scale Project number Date Drawn by AIA, CPHC, LEED AP BD+C 129 Sawkill Avenue Milford PA 18337 Office 570 296 0466 Mobile 267 294 9818 richard@richardpedranti.com KARPIAK/MULHALLRESIDENCE 1700PineStreetScranton,PA18510 SCHEMATIC DESIGN DOCUMENTS NewresidencedesignedtomeetthePassiveHouseStandard Richard Pedranti is a Certified Passive House Consultant (CPHC) through the Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) RICHARD PEDRANTI ARCHITECT P A S S I V E H O U S E 3/8" = 1'-0" 9/25/201210:29:43AM A10 Building Section 1 12-6 Karpiak / Mulhall September 21, 2012 RBP 3/8" = 1'-0" 1 Building Section 1
  3. 3. Scale Project number Date Drawn by AIA, CPHC, LEED AP BD+C 129 Sawkill Avenue Milford PA 18337 Office 570 296 0466 Mobile 267 294 9818 richard@richardpedranti.com KARPIAK/MULHALLRESIDENCE 1700PineStreetScranton,PA18510 SCHEMATIC DESIGN DOCUMENTS NewresidencedesignedtomeetthePassiveHouseStandard Richard Pedranti is a Certified Passive House Consultant (CPHC) through the Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) RICHARD PEDRANTI ARCHITECT P A S S I V E H O U S E 9/25/201210:29:53AM A13 Exterior Views 12-6 Karpiak / Mulhall September 21, 2012 RBP 1/A13 Exterior view from the northeast 2/A13 Exterior view from the southeast 3/A13 Exterior view from the north 4/A13 Exterior view from the northeast 5/A13 Exterior view from the east 6/A13 Exterior view from the southwest 7/A13 Exterior view from the west
  4. 4. DN 1 2 3 4 7 8 9 10 6 11 5 WHEELER AVENUE PINE STREET Property line Building envelope Lands of Christie P. Karpiak and Declan Mulhall D.B. 1367, PG. 200 PIN 157.10-050-001 Area = 0.35 Acres (15,241 sq/ft) SHERWOOD COURT New 2 1/2 story residence Entrance 1 7 0 0 P I N E S T R E E T Scale Project number Date Drawn by AIA, CPHC, LEED AP BD+C 129 Sawkill Avenue Milford PA 18337 Office 570 296 0466 Mobile 267 294 9818 richard@richardpedranti.com KARPIAK/MULHALLRESIDENCE 1700PineStreetScranton,PA18510 SCHEMATIC DESIGN DOCUMENTS NewresidencedesignedtomeetthePassiveHouseStandard Richard Pedranti is a Certified Passive House Consultant (CPHC) through the Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) RICHARD PEDRANTI ARCHITECT P A S S I V E H O U S E 1/16" = 1'-0" 9/25/201210:29:14AM A0 S1 Site Plan 12-6 Karpiak / Mulhall September 21, 2012 RBP 1/16" = 1'-0" 1 Site Plan CLIMATE AND GEOGRAPHIC DESIGN CRITERIA FOR THE 2009 TABLE R302.1IRC PASSIVE HOUSE DESIGN CRITERIA Ground Snow Load Wind Speed Seismic Design Category Weathering Frost Line Depth Termite Winter Design Temp Flood Hazard Air Freezing Index Mean Annual Temp Ice Barrier Required Heating Degree Days Cooling Degree Days 50 <90 B Severe(43) 3'-6" Moderate to Heavy 0 Degrees Yes Zone 1000-2000 49.1 Degrees 6,291 539 Climate Zone Zone 6 Conditioned Area 2,128 sq/ft Conditioned Volume Mean Days Clear 70 Mean Days Rain 140 Mean Days Snow 13 Percent Possible Sunshine 51% Average Annual Precipitation 36.00" Average Annual Snowfall 47.00" 17,024 cu/ft Location Plan A Location Plan B Subject to damage from Sheet List Sheet Number Sheet Name Current Revision Date Drawn By Sheet Issue Date A0 PH1 Passive House Information RBP 08/16/12 A0 S1 Site Plan RBP 08/16/12 A1 Garden Level Floor Plan RBP 08/09/12 A2 First Floor Plan RBP 08/09/12 A3 Second Floor Plan RBP 08/09/12 A4 Roof Plan RBP 08/16/12 A5 North Elevation RBP 08/16/12 A6 South Elevation RBP 08/16/12 A7 East Elevation RBP 08/16/12 A8 West Elevation RBP 08/16/12 A9 Elevation Lighting Studies RBP 09/18/12 A10 Building Section 1 RBP 08/16/12 A11 Schedules and Specifications RBP 08/16/12 A12 Exterior Wall Mock Up RBP 08/14/12 A13 Exterior Views RBP 08/16/12
  5. 5. UP UP A6 A5 A8 1 1 1 1 A10 1 2 3 4 7 8 9 10 6 11 5 21 22 16' - 6 1/2" 3' - 6" 12' - 8 1/2" 21'-0" 274 SF Work Room 1 228 SF Recreational Space 2 15 55 SF Mechanical Room 15 2' - 0" 18 14 5'-93/4" 3' - 9 1/32" 7' - 6 1/2" 5'-11" 16 7'-0" 3' - 5 31/32" 22 SF Laundry Room 16 24 SF Powder Room 17 1 Z15 192 SF Greenhouse 18 11' - 9 1/4" 12' - 0" 11' - 9 1/4" 35' - 6 1/2" 23'-53/4"8'-23/4" 31'-81/2" 23'-53/4"8'-23/4" 31'-81/2" 7' - 4 7/8" 20' - 8 3/4" 7' - 4 7/8" 35' - 6 1/2" 17 20 19 23 Scale Project number Date Drawn by AIA, CPHC, LEED AP BD+C 129 Sawkill Avenue Milford PA 18337 Office 570 296 0466 Mobile 267 294 9818 richard@richardpedranti.com KARPIAK/MULHALLRESIDENCE 1700PineStreetScranton,PA18510 SCHEMATIC DESIGN DOCUMENTS NewresidencedesignedtomeetthePassiveHouseStandard Richard Pedranti is a Certified Passive House Consultant (CPHC) through the Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) RICHARD PEDRANTI ARCHITECT P A S S I V E H O U S E 1/4" = 1'-0" 9/25/201210:29:16AM A1 Garden Level Floor Plan 12-6 Karpiak / Mulhall September 21, 2012 RBP 1/4" = 1'-0" 1 Garden Level
  6. 6. UP DN DN A6 A5 A8 1 1 1 24'-0" 1 A10 1 2 3 4 7 8 9 10 6 11 5 8'-0"8'-0"8'-0"8'-0"8'-0" 12' - 0" 12' - 0" 12' - 0" 12' - 0" 17'-81/2" 1 2' - 0" 2 10 4 16' - 8 3/4" 4' - 1" 12' - 5 1/4" 21'-3" 6' - 11 1/2" 6'-51/4" 45 SF Mud Room 3 433 SF Living Room 4 254 SF Kitchen and Dining 5 185 SF Screen Porch 6 267 SF Deck 7 12' - 5 1/4" 4 20' - 4 1/4" 9'-21/2" 5'-73/16" 4' - 2 1/8" 8' - 4 1/4" 7'-11/2" 2' - 0" 3'-0" 2' - 0" 0'-31/2" 3' - 6"13' - 2 3/4" 1' - 0" 2' - 0" 3' - 2" 1' - 1" 12' - 7" 2' - 6" 1 Z15 6' - 0" 6 7 3 1 19 9 3 13 2 5' - 7 11/32" 3' - 1 1/4" 3' - 3 13/32" 6' - 0" 6' - 0" 2' - 1 5/8"2' - 2 3/4"2' - 2 3/4" 5' - 4 7/8" 36' - 0" 12'-0"12'-0" 24'-0" 7' - 7 5/8" 10' - 4 3/8" 9' - 3 13/32" 8' - 8 19/32"2' - 6" 38' - 6" 7'-47/8"4'-71/8"4'-71/8"7'-47/8"8'-0" 24'-0"8'-0" 32'-0" 24 1 A11 Scale Project number Date Drawn by AIA, CPHC, LEED AP BD+C 129 Sawkill Avenue Milford PA 18337 Office 570 296 0466 Mobile 267 294 9818 richard@richardpedranti.com KARPIAK/MULHALLRESIDENCE 1700PineStreetScranton,PA18510 SCHEMATIC DESIGN DOCUMENTS NewresidencedesignedtomeetthePassiveHouseStandard Richard Pedranti is a Certified Passive House Consultant (CPHC) through the Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) RICHARD PEDRANTI ARCHITECT P A S S I V E H O U S E 1/4" = 1'-0" 9/25/201210:29:19AM A2 First Floor Plan 12-6 Karpiak / Mulhall September 21, 2012 RBP 1/4" = 1'-0" 1 First Floor
  7. 7. DN DN A6 A5 A71 A8 1 1 1 1 A10 1 2 3 4 7 8 9 10 6 11 5 8 6 5 12' - 5 1/4" 0' - 4 1/2" 7' - 5 1/2" 0' - 6 1/2" 4' - 1 3/4" 0' - 4 1/2" 7' - 11" 12' - 5 1/4" 0' - 4 1/2" 7' - 5 1/2" 0' - 6 1/2" 12' - 5 1/4" 16'-3"5'-0" 16'-3"5'-0" 10'-51/4"0'-41/2"10'-51/4" 114 SF Bedroom 2 8 114 SF Bedroom 1 9 37 SF Bath 1 10 46 SF Bath 2 12 169 SF Master Bedroom 13 118 SF Hall 14 109 11 7'-31/2" 2' - 0" 12 1' - 6" 1' - 1 3/4" 2'-0" 10' - 0 3/4" 13'-7" 3' - 11" 3' - 6 1/2" 1 Z15 11121314 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 5' - 7 11/32" 3' - 1 1/4" 9' - 3 13/32" 10' - 4 3/8" 7' - 7 5/8" 36' - 0" 12'-0"12'-0" 24'-0" 10'-3"3'-6"10'-3" 24'-0" 5' - 7 11/32" 3' - 1 1/4" 9' - 3 13/32" 9' - 3 13/32" 3' - 1 1/4" 5' - 7 11/32" 36' - 0" 7 8 13 1 A11 -- Scale Project number Date Drawn by AIA, CPHC, LEED AP BD+C 129 Sawkill Avenue Milford PA 18337 Office 570 296 0466 Mobile 267 294 9818 richard@richardpedranti.com KARPIAK/MULHALLRESIDENCE 1700PineStreetScranton,PA18510 SCHEMATIC DESIGN DOCUMENTS NewresidencedesignedtomeetthePassiveHouseStandard Richard Pedranti is a Certified Passive House Consultant (CPHC) through the Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) RICHARD PEDRANTI ARCHITECT P A S S I V E H O U S E 1/4" = 1'-0" 9/25/201210:29:21AM A3 Second Floor Plan 12-6 Karpiak / Mulhall September 21, 2012 RBP 1/4" = 1'-0" 1 Second Floor
  8. 8. A6 A5 A8 1 1 1 1 A10 1 2 3 4 7 8 9 10 6 11 5 1 Z15 Scale Project number Date Drawn by AIA, CPHC, LEED AP BD+C 129 Sawkill Avenue Milford PA 18337 Office 570 296 0466 Mobile 267 294 9818 richard@richardpedranti.com KARPIAK/MULHALLRESIDENCE 1700PineStreetScranton,PA18510 SCHEMATIC DESIGN DOCUMENTS NewresidencedesignedtomeetthePassiveHouseStandard Richard Pedranti is a Certified Passive House Consultant (CPHC) through the Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) RICHARD PEDRANTI ARCHITECT P A S S I V E H O U S E 1/4" = 1'-0" 9/25/201210:29:22AM A4 Roof Plan 12-6 Karpiak / Mulhall September 21, 2012 RBP 1/4" = 1'-0" 1 Roof Plan
  9. 9. First Floor 0' - 0" Second Floor 10' - 0" Roof 18' - 0" Garden Level -9' - 0" 12345 5 1 Z15 11 12 13 14 6 321 1 1 A11 Metal roof Intus windows Reverse board and batten siding Grade Scale Project number Date Drawn by AIA, CPHC, LEED AP BD+C 129 Sawkill Avenue Milford PA 18337 Office 570 296 0466 Mobile 267 294 9818 richard@richardpedranti.com KARPIAK/MULHALLRESIDENCE 1700PineStreetScranton,PA18510 SCHEMATIC DESIGN DOCUMENTS NewresidencedesignedtomeetthePassiveHouseStandard Richard Pedranti is a Certified Passive House Consultant (CPHC) through the Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) RICHARD PEDRANTI ARCHITECT P A S S I V E H O U S E 1/4" = 1'-0" 9/25/201210:29:24AM A5 North Elevation 12-6 Karpiak / Mulhall September 21, 2012 RBP 1/4" = 1'-0" 1 North Elevation
  10. 10. First Floor 0' - 0" Second Floor 10' - 0" Roof 18' - 0" Garden Level -9' - 0" 1 A10 1 2 3 4 5 18 9 17 19 20 21 8 3 21 22 23 1 A11 Grade Grade beyond Optional roof mounted PV system Metal roof Intus windows Screen porch Scale Project number Date Drawn by AIA, CPHC, LEED AP BD+C 129 Sawkill Avenue Milford PA 18337 Office 570 296 0466 Mobile 267 294 9818 richard@richardpedranti.com KARPIAK/MULHALLRESIDENCE 1700PineStreetScranton,PA18510 SCHEMATIC DESIGN DOCUMENTS NewresidencedesignedtomeetthePassiveHouseStandard Richard Pedranti is a Certified Passive House Consultant (CPHC) through the Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) RICHARD PEDRANTI ARCHITECT P A S S I V E H O U S E 1/4" = 1'-0" 9/25/201210:29:27AM A6 South Elevation 12-6 Karpiak / Mulhall September 21, 2012 RBP 1/4" = 1'-0" 1 South Elevation
  11. 11. First Floor 0' - 0" Second Floor 10' - 0" Roof 18' - 0" 78910 611 22 10 4 2 Intus windows Reverse board and batten siding Metal roof Screen porch Grade Grade Scale Project number Date Drawn by AIA, CPHC, LEED AP BD+C 129 Sawkill Avenue Milford PA 18337 Office 570 296 0466 Mobile 267 294 9818 richard@richardpedranti.com KARPIAK/MULHALLRESIDENCE 1700PineStreetScranton,PA18510 SCHEMATIC DESIGN DOCUMENTS NewresidencedesignedtomeetthePassiveHouseStandard Richard Pedranti is a Certified Passive House Consultant (CPHC) through the Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) RICHARD PEDRANTI ARCHITECT P A S S I V E H O U S E 1/4" = 1'-0" 9/25/201210:29:30AM A7 East Elevation 12-6 Karpiak / Mulhall September 21, 2012 RBP 1/4" = 1'-0" 1 East Elevation
  12. 12. First Floor 0' - 0" Second Floor 10' - 0" Roof 18' - 0" Garden Level -9' - 0" 7 8 9 106 11 15 16 7 Opional roof mounted PV system Grade Grade Metal roof Reverse board and batten siding Intus Windows Scale Project number Date Drawn by AIA, CPHC, LEED AP BD+C 129 Sawkill Avenue Milford PA 18337 Office 570 296 0466 Mobile 267 294 9818 richard@richardpedranti.com KARPIAK/MULHALLRESIDENCE 1700PineStreetScranton,PA18510 SCHEMATIC DESIGN DOCUMENTS NewresidencedesignedtomeetthePassiveHouseStandard Richard Pedranti is a Certified Passive House Consultant (CPHC) through the Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) RICHARD PEDRANTI ARCHITECT P A S S I V E H O U S E 1/4" = 1'-0" 9/25/201210:29:33AM A8 West Elevation 12-6 Karpiak / Mulhall September 21, 2012 RBP 1/4" = 1'-0" 1 West Elevation
  13. 13. Scale Project number Date Drawn by AIA, CPHC, LEED AP BD+C 129 Sawkill Avenue Milford PA 18337 Office 570 296 0466 Mobile 267 294 9818 richard@richardpedranti.com KARPIAK/MULHALLRESIDENCE 1700PineStreetScranton,PA18510 SCHEMATIC DESIGN DOCUMENTS NewresidencedesignedtomeetthePassiveHouseStandard Richard Pedranti is a Certified Passive House Consultant (CPHC) through the Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) RICHARD PEDRANTI ARCHITECT P A S S I V E H O U S E 9/25/201210:29:40AM A9 Elevation Lighting Studies 12-6 Karpiak / Mulhall September 21, 2012 RBP 1/A9 East Elevation 3/A9 North Elevation 2/A9 West Elevation 4/A9 South Elevation
  14. 14. 7 Paintyed gypsum wallboard Inside Wall - 2 x 4 @ 24" O.C. Air Control Layer 5/8" OSB sheathing All seams primed, caulked, and taped Dense pack cellulose insulation R=60 Vapor Open I N S I D EO U T S I D E Vapor Control Layer Rverse board and batten cladding 3/4" furring - air space Water Control Layer Tyvek with seams taped Thermal Control Layer Celotex fiberboard sheathing Outside Wall - 2 x 4 @ 24" O.C. Scale Project number Date Drawn by AIA, CPHC, LEED AP BD+C 129 Sawkill Avenue Milford PA 18337 Office 570 296 0466 Mobile 267 294 9818 richard@richardpedranti.com KARPIAK/MULHALLRESIDENCE 1700PineStreetScranton,PA18510 SCHEMATIC DESIGN DOCUMENTS NewresidencedesignedtomeetthePassiveHouseStandard Richard Pedranti is a Certified Passive House Consultant (CPHC) through the Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) RICHARD PEDRANTI ARCHITECT P A S S I V E H O U S E 1 1/2" = 1'-0" 9/25/201210:29:45AM A11 Schedules and Specifications 12-6 Karpiak / Mulhall September 21, 2012 RBP Door Schedule Door Number Door Size Head Height Manufacturer Model Description Finish U-value Finish Door Frame Comments 1 36" x 84" 6' - 8" Energate Vinyl Line 843 Exterior PH hinged PVC-U PVC-U 0.110 2 36" x 84" 6' - 8" Energate Vinyl Line 843 Exterior PH hinged PVC-U PVC-U 0.107 3 72" x 80" 6' - 8" Energate Vinyl Line 843 Exterior PH sliding PVC-U PVC-U 0.108 4 72" x 80" 6' - 8" Simpson Sliding closet door Wood Wood 5 30" x 80" 6' - 8" Simpson Flush solid core Wood Wood 6 30" x 80" 6' - 8" Simpson Flush solid core Wood Wood 7 30" x 80" 6' - 8" Simpson Flush solid core Wood Wood 8 30" x 80" 6' - 8" Simpson Flush solid core Wood Wood 9 30" x 80" 6' - 8" Simpson Flush solid core Wood Wood 10 30" x 80" 6' - 8" Simpson Flush solid core Wood Wood 11 48" x 80" 6' - 8" Simpson Sliding closet door Wood Wood 12 72" x 80" 6' - 8" Simpson Sliding closet door Wood PVC-U 13 72" x 80" 6' - 8" Simpson Sliding closet door Wood Wood 14 24" x 80" 6' - 8" Simpson Flush solid core Wood PVC-U 15 30" x 80" 6' - 8" Simpson Flush solid core Wood Wood 16 60" x 80" 6' - 8" Simpson Sliding closet door Wood PVC-U 17 60" x 80" 6' - 8" Simpson Sliding closet door Wood Wood 18 60" x 80" 6' - 8" Simpson Sliding closet door Wood PVC-U 19 60" x 80" 6' - 8" Simpson Sliding closet door Wood Wood 20 60" x 80" 6' - 8" Simpson Sliding closet door PVC-U PVC-U 21 72" x 80" 6' - 8" Energate Vinyl Line 843 Exterior PH sliding PVC-U PVC-U 22 72" x 80" 6' - 8" Energate Vinyl Line 843 Exterior PH sliding PVC-U PVC-U 0.108 23 30" x 80" 6' - 8" Hinged screen door Wood Wood 0.108 24 30" x 80" 6' - 6" Hinged screen door Wood Wood Window Schedule Mark Rough Opening Head Height Type Manufacturer Model Material Glazing Ug SHGC VT CommentsWidth Height Type 1 2' - 0" 2' - 6" 6' - 8" Casement with Trim Intus Windows Eforte PVC-U Triple glazed .123 53.2 71.3 In swing tilt/turn 2 2' - 0" 2' - 6" 6' - 8" Casement with Trim Intus Windows Eforte PVC-U Triple glazed .123 53.2 71.3 In swing tilt/turn 3 2' - 0" 2' - 6" 6' - 8" Casement with Trim Intus Windows Eforte PVC-U Triple glazed .123 53.2 71.3 In swing tilt/turn 4 2' - 0" 2' - 6" 6' - 8" Casement with Trim Intus Windows Eforte PVC-U Triple glazed .123 53.2 71.3 In swing tilt/turn 5 3' - 10" 4' - 0" 6' - 8" Fixed with Trim Intus Windows Eforte PVC-U Triple glazed .123 53.2 71.3 6 2' - 0" 4' - 0" 6' - 8" Casement with Trim Intus Windows Eforte PVC-U Triple glazed .123 53.2 71.3 In swing tilt/turn 7 5' - 0" 4' - 0" 7' - 0" Fixed with Trim Intus Windows Eforte PVC-U Triple glazed .123 53.2 71.3 8 6' - 0" 4' - 0" 6' - 8" Fixed with Trim Intus Windows Eforte PVC-U Triple glazed .123 53.2 71.3 9 3' - 10" 4' - 0" 6' - 8" Fixed with Trim Intus Windows Eforte PVC-U Triple glazed .123 53.2 71.3 10 3' - 0" 3' - 0" 6' - 8" Casement with Trim Intus Windows Eforte PVC-U Triple glazed .123 53.2 71.3 In swing tilt/turn 11 2' - 0" 2' - 6" 6' - 8" Casement with Trim Intus Windows Eforte PVC-U Triple glazed .123 53.2 71.3 In swing tilt/turn 12 2' - 0" 2' - 6" 6' - 8" Casement with Trim Intus Windows Eforte PVC-U Triple glazed .123 53.2 71.3 In swing tilt/turn 13 3' - 10" 4' - 0" 6' - 8" Fixed with Trim Intus Windows Eforte PVC-U Triple glazed .123 53.2 71.3 14 2' - 0" 4' - 0" 6' - 8" Casement with Trim Intus Windows Eforte PVC-U Triple glazed .123 53.2 71.3 In swing tilt/turn 15 2' - 0" 2' - 6" 6' - 8" Casement with Trim Intus Windows Eforte PVC-U Triple glazed .123 53.2 71.3 In swing tilt/turn 16 2' - 0" 2' - 6" 6' - 8" Casement with Trim Intus Windows Eforte PVC-U Triple glazed .123 53.2 71.3 In swing tilt/turn 17 2' - 0" 4' - 0" 6' - 8" Casement with Trim Intus Windows Eforte PVC-U Triple glazed .123 53.2 71.3 In swing tilt/turn 18 3' - 10" 4' - 0" 6' - 8" Fixed with Trim Intus Windows Eforte PVC-U Triple glazed .123 53.2 71.3 19 6' - 0" 4' - 0" 6' - 8" Fixed with Trim Intus Windows Eforte PVC-U Triple glazed .123 53.2 71.3 20 3' - 10" 4' - 0" 6' - 8" Fixed with Trim Intus Windows Eforte PVC-U Triple glazed .123 53.2 71.3 21 2' - 0" 4' - 0" 6' - 8" Casement with Trim Intus Windows Eforte PVC-U Triple glazed .123 53.2 71.3 In swing tilt/turn 22 3' - 0" 4' - 0" 6' - 8" Casement with Trim Intus Windows Eforte PVC-U .123 53.2 71.3 In swing tilt/turn 23 2' - 0" 4' - 0" 6' - 8" Casement with Trim Intus Windows Eforte PVC-U Triple glazed .123 53.2 71.3 In swing tilt/turn Room Finish Schedule Room Number Room Name Finish CommentsFloor Base Wall Ceiling 1 Work Room Concrete 1 x 4 Gypbd Gypb 2 Recreational Space Concrete 1 x 4 Gypbd Gypb 3 Mud Room Tile Tile 42" Tile Gypb 4 Living Room Wood 1 x 4 Gypbd Gypb 5 Kitchen and Dining Wood 1 x 4 Gypbd Gypb 6 Screen Porch Fir 1 x 4 NA Wood 7 Deck Fir NA NA NA 8 Bedroom 2 Wood 1 x 4 Gypbd Gypb 9 Bedroom 1 Wood 1 x 4 Gypbd Gypb 10 Bath 1 Tile Tile 42" Tile Gypb 11 Closet Wood 1 x 4 Gypbd Gypb 12 Bath 2 Tile Tile 42" Tile Gypb 13 Master Bedroom Wood 1 x 4 Gypbd Gypb 14 Hall Wood 1 x 4 Gypbd Gypb 15 Mechanical Room Concrete 1 x 4 Gypbd Gypb 16 Laundry Room Concrete 1 x 4 Gypbd Gypb 17 Powder Room Tile Tile 42" Tile Gypb 18 Greenhouse Concrete NA NA NA 19 Closet Concrete 1 x 4 Gypbd Gypb Annual Heating Load 4.75 KBTU/ft2 yr Annual Cooling Load 4.75 KBTU/ft2 yr Peak heat load 3.17 KBTU/hr ft2 Peak cooling load 2.54 KBTU/hr ft2 Annual Primary Energy 38 KBTU/ft2 yr Air tightness .6 ACH@50Pa Ventilation 75% recovery Thermal envelope 38.5 hr ft2 f/BTU Thermal bridge free .006 BTU/hr ft2 f U value- installed win .15 BTU/hr ft2 f SHGC 50% to 55% Max delta int air/sur 7.2 F Min vent F winter 62 F Max heat coil F 125.6 F DHW per person 6.6 gal/occupant@140 F Max occupant sq/ft 377 sq/ft per occupant Indoor surface temps 68F Minimum wall surface temp 64F Minimum indoor window temp 60.8F Cooling season design temp 77F 1 1/2" = 1'-0" 1 Typical Exterior Wall Construction 1. Water Control Layer A sheet, spray or trowel-applied membrane or material layer that controls the passage of liquid water. 2. Air Control Layer Air control layers are materials designed and constructed to control air flow across a building enclosure. 3. Vapor Control Layer The components that are designed and installed in an assembly to control the movement of water by vapor diffusion. 4. Thermal Control Layer The layer in a building enclosure that controls the transfer of energy (heat) between the interior and the exterior. Hygrothermal Layers Passive House Design Parameters Outline specification of Building Assemblies 1. Foundation Slab Assembly R=45 +/- Provide 4"reinforced concrete slab over 8" of rigid insulation. Provide continuous polyethelene air barrier under slab and taped to exterior walls. 2. Foundation Wall Assembly R=50 +/- Provide 8" poured concrete Insulated Concrete Form (ICF) foundation walls with interior 2x4 @ 24" O.C. stud wall with 3.5" of rock wool insulation and painted gypsum board wall finish. Provide veneer stone on exterior face of ICF wall above grade. 3. Exterior Wall Assembly R=71+/- Provide double 2x4 @ 24" O.C. exterior walls with interior painted gypsum wallboard finish, 3 1/2" rock wool insulation in service cavity, OSB air barrier on outside face of interior 2x4 wall with seams primed, caulked, taped , dense pack cellulose cavity insulation, celotex fiberboard sheathing, Tyvek house wrap with seams taped, 3/4" furing strips (air space), reverse board and batten cladding with painted finish. 4. Roof Assembly R=85+/- Provide raised heel roof truss at 24" O.C. with interior painted gypsum walboard finish, 2x4 service cavity ceiling with rock wool insulation, OSB air barrier with seams primed, caulked, taped at bottom of truss, loose fill cellulose insulation, celotex structodek roof sheathing, Tyvek house wrap with seamms taped, 3/4" furring strips (air space), metal panel roofing. Advanced Framing Advanced house framing, sometimes called optimum value engineering (OVE), refers to framing techniques designed to reduce the amount of lumber used and waste generated in the construction of a wood-framed house. These techniques boost energy efficiency by replacing lumber with insulation material while maintaining the structural integrity of the home. Advanced framing improves the whole-wall R-value by reducing thermal bridging (thermal flow that occurs when materials that are poor insulators displace insulation) through the framing and maximizing the insulated wall area. These techniques include • Designing homes on 2-foot modules to make the best use of common sheet good sizes and reduce waste and labor. • Spacing wall studs up to 24 inches on-center. • Spacing floor joists and roof rafters up to 24 inches on-center. • Using two-stud corner framing and inexpensive drywall clips or scrap lumber for drywall backing instead of studs. • Eliminating headers in non-load-bearing walls. • Using in-line framing in which floor, wall, and roof framing members are vertically in line with one another and loads are transferred directly downward. • Using single lumber headers and top plates when appropriate. Construction Means and Methods Note: All control layers shall be continuous at walls, ceilings, and floors. For further information on advanced framing techniques and details see Building Science Corporation BSC-030 Advanced Framing Raised heel No headers in non bearing wall Single stud at rough opening No cripples 2 stud corner Roof trusses line up wall and floor Single top plate Single top plate Point load transfered between studs with closure material and solid blocking Advanced Framing Isometric Two stud corner Clip support for gypsum board Single top plate Single header with cavity open for inteior insulation2x6 Connector plate Clip support for gypsum board Advanced framing corner detail Advanced framing interior partition detail Advanced framing header detail
  15. 15. Scale Project number Date Drawn by AIA, CPHC, LEED AP BD+C 129 Sawkill Avenue Milford PA 18337 Office 570 296 0466 Mobile 267 294 9818 richard@richardpedranti.com KARPIAK/MULHALLRESIDENCE 1700PineStreetScranton,PA18510 SCHEMATIC DESIGN DOCUMENTS NewresidencedesignedtomeetthePassiveHouseStandard Richard Pedranti is a Certified Passive House Consultant (CPHC) through the Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) RICHARD PEDRANTI ARCHITECT P A S S I V E H O U S E 9/25/201210:29:50AM A12 Exterior Wall Mock Up 12-6 Karpiak / Mulhall September 21, 2012 RBP 1/A12 Detail View of window installtion from the inside 3/A12 Detail View of window installtion from the inside 2/A12 Detail View of window installtion from the inside 4/A12 Detail View of window installtion from the inside 2x4 @ 24" O.C. interior wall OSB plywood = air seal Air caulking 3M 8067 tape at all air seal seams over primer Gypsum wall board with latex paint Rock wool cavity insulation - not shown Dense pack cellulose insulation 2x4 @ 24" O.C. exterior wall Grace Vycor flashing Wood sill Grace Vycor flashing Window clip by Intus Windows Silcone bead at clip and tape Window tape = air seal Low expanding spray foam Intus PVC-U casement window U=.14 Reverse board and batten exterior cladding Celotex fiberboard Tyvek WRB 3M 8067 tape at tyvek seams 3/4" batten Vented cladding with 3/4" air space 2x4 @ 24" O.C.exterior wall Dense pack cellulose insulation 2x4 @ 24" O.C. interior wall LSL timberstrand window jamb Grace Vycor window flashing 3M tape to WRB 1" XPS over insulatino at exterior of window frame Low expanding spray foam 3M 8067 tape to window tape Aluminum window sill Intus casement window U=.14 Wood window casing Wood window sill Primed LSL timberstrand window jamb Grace Vycor window flashing Winow tape to indow flashing = air seal Low expanding foam Expanding foam gasket Window clip Silicone bead at window clip and tape for air sealing Window tape = air seal Grace vycor window flashing Intus casement window U=.14 Reverse board and batten vented cladding M 8067 tape to WRB Expanding foam gasket Low expanding foam 1" XPS over insulation at window frame exterior Window taped to 3M 8067 tape Aluminum window sill Wood window jamb Window taped to 3M 8067 tape 3M 8067 tape over 1" XPS insulation Intus PVC-U casement window U=.14 Grace Vycor window flashing 1" XPS over insulation on window jamb 2x4 @ 24" O.C. interior wall Wood window casing

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