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Dr Richard Hyde
richard@mind-click.com
 Collaborative rapid authoring suite
 PowerPoint import
 Systems training import
 Issue management
 Accessible output...
What am I talking about?
 A model for categorising rapid content
 Action mapping to give space for creativity
 Adding i...
Ask the audience...
What holds you back most from
being creative when building
your rapid e-learning?
What are developers thinking?
Rigid
development
process
Rapid e-
learning is the
standard
Budgets are
squeezed
Timelines a...
What are learners thinking?
It’s pretty
dull
It’s a
predictable
format
Too much
knowledge
How can I
skip?
Which bits
do I ...
Avoiding the security blanket of
information dump
Pareto principle
20%
80%
20%
80%
Activity Results
Pareto principle
Application
Retrieval of information to solve
problems, make connections & apply
to practical situations
...
Example: Pareto principle
A course to train bank tellers
what to do in the event of a
bank robbery.
Example: Pareto principle
 How to prepare an incident report
 How to stay calm
 How to use the reference guide to
repor...
Ask the audience...
If you are under pressure to
delivery knowledge-based
courses, how does this affect
the quality of you...
Goal > Action > Activity > Information
Action mapping
Goal
Action
Action
Action
Activity
Activity
Activity
Example: Action mapping
http://www.mindmeister.com/
Making learners as intrigued about the next
page as the current page
Interaction basics
 Contain: context > challenge > activity > feedback
 Focus on the application content
 Test the lear...
When to use interaction?
Use interaction when...
Content is complex and difficult to
understand
Errors are costly or diffi...
Holistic interaction
 Linking interaction together
 Make learners as intrigued about the next page as
the current page
...
Examples: Holistic interaction
At the start, you thought
you were an effective
communicator. What do
you think now?
You ha...
Empty space speaks volumes
Ask the audience...
What type of designer are you?
Nervous wreck Creative mess Over-worker
CopycatTrend setterMr Average
What is design sense?
CRAP design rules
Example: CRAP design rules
Induction course
This is our spanking brand
new induction course for
all new starters. Click th...
Example: CRAP design rules
Induction course
This is our spanking brand
new induction course for
all new starters.
Click th...
Clip art revisited
Clip art revisited
Look Rob, I’m fed
up with working in
this office!
Not again.
How can I
deal with
this?
Clip art revisited
A business is made up of stories, not
information
Ask the audience...
When was the last time you
wrote a hand written letter?
Why use stories?
Stories
Engage &
inspire
Aid
understanding
& retrieval
Are fun &
entertaining
Encourage
creativity
Bring
...
Types of story
Scenarios
Anecdotes
Case
studies
Examples
Illustrations
Metaphors
Why are films so engrossing?
Thomas the Tank Engine
Examples: Managing conflict
Managing conflict: metaphor
We are all different. With our own
values, opinions and cultures.
Together, our differences ca...
Managing conflict: scenario
It wasn’t supposed to be like this.
You chose Bob and Tanya for this
project team because they...
Managing conflict: case study
Kate Young had been verbally abused by
another manager for 6 months.
Close to a nervous brea...
Managing conflict
If you do nothing else
1: Content
Avoid the security
blanket of information
dump
2: Interaction
Link interactions
together to entice
learners to click
‘next’
3: Creative design
Empty space speaks
Volumes
4: Technology
Don’t be obsessed
with your authoring
tool’s capabilities
Follow these people
Gabe Anderson
http://www.articulate.com/blog
Cathy Moore
http://blog.cathy-moore.com
Dr Richard Hyde
richard@mind-click.com
KaplanITLearning@kaplan.com
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Adding creativity to e-learning webinar

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Adding creativity to e-learning webinar

  1. 1. Dr Richard Hyde richard@mind-click.com
  2. 2.  Collaborative rapid authoring suite  PowerPoint import  Systems training import  Issue management  Accessible output  Sound, video and image editing  Content manageable Flash interactions  SCORM publishing http://www.kaplanit.com KaplanITLearning@kaplan.com
  3. 3. What am I talking about?  A model for categorising rapid content  Action mapping to give space for creativity  Adding interaction that sticks  Creative design for non-designers  Writing stories that engage learner emotions  3 things to remember and 1 to avoid
  4. 4. Ask the audience... What holds you back most from being creative when building your rapid e-learning?
  5. 5. What are developers thinking? Rigid development process Rapid e- learning is the standard Budgets are squeezed Timelines are ridiculous Limited creative skills How do I take my courses to the ‘next level’ Stressed? Moi?
  6. 6. What are learners thinking? It’s pretty dull It’s a predictable format Too much knowledge How can I skip? Which bits do I actually need? Bored? Moi?
  7. 7. Avoiding the security blanket of information dump
  8. 8. Pareto principle 20% 80% 20% 80% Activity Results
  9. 9. Pareto principle Application Retrieval of information to solve problems, make connections & apply to practical situations Understanding Retrieval of information & restating in own words Knowledge Retrieval of information but not necessarily understanding Performance outcomes & key ideas Processes, tasks, steps & procedures Tools, references & forms People relationships & coordination
  10. 10. Example: Pareto principle A course to train bank tellers what to do in the event of a bank robbery.
  11. 11. Example: Pareto principle  How to prepare an incident report  How to stay calm  How to use the reference guide to report the incident  Who to call or report to if you notice anything suspicious  How to assess potential bank robbers  How to call the police  How to trigger the alarm  How to help customers stay calm  What the bank insurance covers in this type of incident  How to make sure everyone is safe, including you Performance outcomes & key ideas Processes, tasks, steps & procedures Tools, references & forms People relationships & coordination
  12. 12. Ask the audience... If you are under pressure to delivery knowledge-based courses, how does this affect the quality of your e-learning?
  13. 13. Goal > Action > Activity > Information
  14. 14. Action mapping Goal Action Action Action Activity Activity Activity
  15. 15. Example: Action mapping http://www.mindmeister.com/
  16. 16. Making learners as intrigued about the next page as the current page
  17. 17. Interaction basics  Contain: context > challenge > activity > feedback  Focus on the application content  Test the learner’s brain not your competence with an authoring tool  Include interaction every few minutes  Basic tools, storytelling, creativity and imagination are as effective as games and flashy effects http://www.engaginginteractions.com
  18. 18. When to use interaction? Use interaction when... Content is complex and difficult to understand Errors are costly or difficult to remedy Information needs to be internalised Change to existing skill is major and requires practice Learners need to differentiate between good and poor performance Use presentation when... Content is readily understood by learners Errors are harmless Information is available for late retrieval and reference Change to existing skill is minor and can be achieved without practice Learners can differentiate between good and poor performance
  19. 19. Holistic interaction  Linking interaction together  Make learners as intrigued about the next page as the current page  Techniques:  Create suspense  Delay feedback  Benefits:  Better course completion  Improved retention
  20. 20. Examples: Holistic interaction At the start, you thought you were an effective communicator. What do you think now? You have to make a critical purchasing decision. You need to justify this decision to the board. What would you do first? Answer reassessment Branching story Do you need help with that? I think I know what you are trying to do. Investigative Was there anything wrong with that transaction? Character / agent
  21. 21. Empty space speaks volumes
  22. 22. Ask the audience... What type of designer are you? Nervous wreck Creative mess Over-worker CopycatTrend setterMr Average
  23. 23. What is design sense?
  24. 24. CRAP design rules
  25. 25. Example: CRAP design rules Induction course This is our spanking brand new induction course for all new starters. Click the button to start. Begin
  26. 26. Example: CRAP design rules Induction course This is our spanking brand new induction course for all new starters. Click the button to start. Begin
  27. 27. Clip art revisited
  28. 28. Clip art revisited
  29. 29. Look Rob, I’m fed up with working in this office! Not again. How can I deal with this? Clip art revisited
  30. 30. A business is made up of stories, not information
  31. 31. Ask the audience... When was the last time you wrote a hand written letter?
  32. 32. Why use stories? Stories Engage & inspire Aid understanding & retrieval Are fun & entertaining Encourage creativity Bring information to life Get us thinking Help us to organise information
  33. 33. Types of story Scenarios Anecdotes Case studies Examples Illustrations Metaphors
  34. 34. Why are films so engrossing?
  35. 35. Thomas the Tank Engine
  36. 36. Examples: Managing conflict
  37. 37. Managing conflict: metaphor We are all different. With our own values, opinions and cultures. Together, our differences can help to build a great team. A team where we draw on our individual strengths, complement each other, and share in our motivation. Just like one, big, happy family. At least, that’s the theory...
  38. 38. Managing conflict: scenario It wasn’t supposed to be like this. You chose Bob and Tanya for this project team because they usually work so well together. Poles apart in their strengths and personalities, they somehow just seem to fit. But it’s different this time. Relations seem frosty and it’s affecting everyone’s morale. Soon, your business critical project will start to suffer. What do you do now?
  39. 39. Managing conflict: case study Kate Young had been verbally abused by another manager for 6 months. Close to a nervous breakdown, she took a month off work. When she returned she was determined to meet the problem head on. But she didn’t. She is now on long term sick leave. This is why we train you on how to manage conflict in the workplace.
  40. 40. Managing conflict
  41. 41. If you do nothing else
  42. 42. 1: Content Avoid the security blanket of information dump
  43. 43. 2: Interaction Link interactions together to entice learners to click ‘next’
  44. 44. 3: Creative design Empty space speaks Volumes
  45. 45. 4: Technology Don’t be obsessed with your authoring tool’s capabilities
  46. 46. Follow these people Gabe Anderson http://www.articulate.com/blog Cathy Moore http://blog.cathy-moore.com
  47. 47. Dr Richard Hyde richard@mind-click.com KaplanITLearning@kaplan.com

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