Portugal’s first attempt at colonizing Brazil was done by instituting hereditary 
captaincies, which were private administ...
The third Governor‐General serving from 1557‐1573 was Mem de Sa. He was 
successful in defeating the native aborigines and...
Establishing A Central Government In Brazil
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Establishing A Central Government In Brazil

425 views

Published on

Published in: Travel, Business
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
425
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
6
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Establishing A Central Government In Brazil

  1. 1. Portugal’s first attempt at colonizing Brazil was done by instituting hereditary  captaincies, which were private administrative divisions. This was due to  Portugal’s small population and the crowns lack of funds to institute a full  blown colonization supported by the monarchy. When these captaincies failed and the crown had seen the potential of the  resources Brazil had to offer such as: brazilwood, sugarcane, and goldmines,  the king ordered that a central government be formed and to turn the  colonization of Brazil back into a royal enterprise. In 1549 the king sent Tome de Sousa, the first Governor‐General of Brazil to  establish a central government in the colony. His first task was to establish the  first capital city, Salvador da Bahia. From 1553‐1557 the second Governor‐General, Duarte da Costa had little success due to the numerous encounters  he faced with hostile natives as well as severe disputes  with other colonizers.
  2. 2. The third Governor‐General serving from 1557‐1573 was Mem de Sa. He was  successful in defeating the native aborigines and expelling the French  Calvinists that had established a colony in Rio de Janeiro. Due to Brazils large size it was divided into two states in 1621, the Estado de  Brasil with Salvador as its colony and the Estado de Maranhao with its capital  in Sao Luis. In 1640 the Governors of Brazil began using the title Viceroy and by 1763 Brazil  officially became a Viceroyalty. In 1775 all Brazilian Estado’s were unified into  the Viceroyalty of Brazil with Rio de Janeiro serving as the capital. This transformation took over two hundred years and by 1775 Brazil operated  just as Portugal did with a city council made up of prominent figures of  colonial society in each city and village, which were responsible for things such  as regulating commerce, public infrastructure, professional artisans, prisons,  and all the necessities to run a city.

×