Epistemological Foundations of Design-Based Research

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Presentation at Canadian Society for the Study of Education annual conference, 2013 Victoria BC.

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Epistemological Foundations of Design-Based Research

  1. 1. Epistemological Foundations of Design Based Research (DBR) Rebecca J. Hogue Twitter: @rjhogue Email: rjhogue@pobox.com
  2. 2. Rebecca J. Hogue • PhD Candidate, University of Ottawa • Faculty of Education • Thesis project in the Department of Family Medicine: “Teaching Family Medicine Preceptor to use Tablet Computers: A Design-Based Research Study” • Specialize in mobile learning, eLearning, and creating educational programs to support technology adoption Rebecca.Hogue@uottawa.ca http://rjhogue.ca @rjhogue
  3. 3. Acknowledgements This study is supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Rebecca J. Hogue, PhD Candidate, @rjhogue
  4. 4. Rebecca J. Hogue, PhD Candidate, @rjhogue "one must learn by doing the thing, for though you think you know it, you have no certainty until you try” ~Sophocles
  5. 5. Introduction 1. What is Design-Based Research (DBR) 2. What are the historical roots of DBR? 3. What are the philosophical underpinnings of DBR? 4. What are the goals of DBR? 5. What constitutes new knowledge in DBR? 6. What is the methodology of DBR? 7. What are the necessary stages of inquiry in DBR? Rebecca J. Hogue, PhD Candidate, @rjhogue
  6. 6. What is Design-Based Research • Form of research that involves creating educational interventions (e.g. workshops, lessons) or artifacts (e.g. computer programs, textbooks) and evaluating them in a real-world context • Theory informs practice • Theory emerges from practice Rebecca J. Hogue, PhD Candidate, @rjhogue
  7. 7. Historical Foundations • DBR evolved out of the need to make educational research more useful to practitioners • During the paradigm wars of the early 90s – Brown (1992) – Collins (1992) • Also known as: development research, formative research, design studies, design experiments, formative evaluation, and engineering research • Design-Based Research Collective (2003) • May use both qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis methods Rebecca J. Hogue, PhD Candidate
  8. 8. Philosophical Underpinnings Pragmatism • New knowledge measured in by the consequences of the research • Value in research is to improve practice Design Sciences • No perfect solution, rather some solutions are better than others • Creating better models is achieved through successive approximation (iterative cycles) Rebecca J. Hogue, PhD Candidate
  9. 9. Goals of DBR The goals in DBR are to: 1. Solve and educational design problem in a real- world context 2. Contribute to scholarly knowledge typically in the form of best practices (Collins, Joseph, & Bielaczyc, 2004; Gravemeijer & Cobb, 2006) Educational design problems are solved through the design and delivery of an educational intervention (e.g. a workshop) and/or artifacts (e.g. textbooks, eBook for iPads) Rebecca J. Hogue, PhD Candidate
  10. 10. What New Knowledge The pragmatic perspective stresses the consequences of the research: • Improved educational theory (e.g. best practices) • Educations resources (e.g. textbooks, PowerPoint slides, website) • Professional development of the participants Rebecca J. Hogue, PhD Candidate, @rjhogue
  11. 11. Methodology Rebecca J. Hogue, PhD Candidate, @rjhogue Initial Design Phase • Problem Analysis (Reeves, 2006) • Initial Solution Design Post Implementation Phase • Program Evaluation • Retrospective Analysis Implementation Phase • Iterative cycles of Design-Deliver-Evaluate Does the problem have a generalizable scope? Initial design is based on both practitioner collaboration and grounded in theory When evaluating cycles, theory may emerge from practice Data is re-analyzed in its entirety Includes an analysis of the DBR process itself
  12. 12. Inquiry in DBR Rebecca J. Hogue, PhD Candidate, @rjhogue Ground Enact Evaluate Reflect Initial designs are grounded in theory Sophocles – Can’t know until we do Happens at multiple times / multiple levels Formative and summative Allows us to extract best practices from the process as a whole
  13. 13. Considerations • Role of the research (conflict between designer and evaluator) • How to define better • Boundaries of iterations – When do stop • Bartlett effect – too much data collection Rebecca J. Hogue, PhD Candidate, @rjhogue
  14. 14. Validity in DBR • How well the enactment represents the intended design • How sustainable the design is after the researcher leaves Rebecca J. Hogue, PhD Candidate, @rjhogue
  15. 15. Summary DBR is a pragmatic approach to research that involves solving an educational design problem in a real world context. It uses iterative cycles of design-enact-evaluate to improve upon educational interventions Theory is used to inform practice, and theory emerges from practice Rebecca J. Hogue, PhD Candidate, @rjhogue
  16. 16. Thank-You Questions? Rebecca J. Hogue Twitter: @rjhogue Email: rjhogue@pobox.com

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