The Re-education
of Administration:
IY

libraries!

what administrators need to know about the role of
libraries, libraria...
2:00pm

12:00pm

Many school administrators often underappreciate the
role of the School Librarian and the Library Media
C...
Most school administrators have backgrounds in
education and teaching.

• Understanding of subject/grade
level specific cu...
We need to teach them
what it means to be a
Librarian.
If the administrator at your school has little or no experience
wit...
Today we will use the Library Media
Endorsement Program from SUU as
our framework.
Each area offers an opportunity for lib...
Children’s
Literature

Children’s literature is more than just story time!
• There are specific skills and standards that ...
Aren’t those skills taught elsewhere?
YES!
…And NO!
Many information literacy skills are inherent in
the other core course...
Information Literacy is more than checking out books.
Most college freshmen:
• Have difficulty developing good research qu...
Children’s
Literature

So, NO story time?
Your principal may ask: Why Read Aloud to Children?

• Children learn by hearing...
Collection
Development
A good library collection is more than just popular reading materials and it is
more than an extens...
…takes
hard work.

Finding a
balance…
•
•
•
•
•
•

Student-friendly
Entertaining
Print
Books
Diversity
Buy what the studen...
What administrators need to know…
Collection development takes time.
• Random list from a book vendor = Weeding unused ite...
Collection development takes cooperation.

Collaboration with other teachers helps to personalize the collection
• Ensures...
Collection development takes expertise.
The librarian needs a strong knowledge of:
• School-wide curriculum
• Understandin...
For most of us the marc record is generated by the vendor
or by a district cataloger, but record maintenance is still
part...
Technology
For Libraries

The librarians role in technology is
different than the role of the IT
Department. For our purpo...
Technology
For Libraries

Professional development
Many librarians hold regular professional development
sessions with the...
Technology
For Libraries

Creating a Web Presence
A Librarian may make a website or it may
be developed by IT but the cont...
Managing

a

Media Center

Besides managing curriculum, technology, professional
development, and resources, librarian als...
Managing

a

Media Center

In order for the library to function at its
best it needs to have the support of
everyone – stu...
Practicum

If we really want administrators to understand what librarians do
we need to give them some experience. Imagine...
Make a plan
What do you think would work for your school?
What ideas do you have?

Where can you start?
Helpful information for further study:
Websites:
http://www.ala.org/aasl/advocacy/resources/position-statements/staffing
h...
Infographics
A great way to convey important information.
Here are some you can use when talking to your school administra...
Contact me with any comments or questions:

Verlene Schafer
Southern Utah University
verleneschafer@suu.edu
435-592-2851

...
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The Re-education of Administration: Why every school administrator should be library certified.

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Library media programs can sometime be undervalued by administration because they don’t understand the many roles librarians fill or the importance of information literacy in academic success and in the role of being a lifelong learner who uses information wisely. Using SUU’s LM Program curriculum as a framework a review of each course will highlight the roles that librarians fill that administrators need to know about, and appreciate in order for the library to be properly staffed, the space used effectively, and for information literacy to be a part of the regular school curriculum as well as a lifelong skill. Courses include: collection development, cataloging, technology, reference, literature, management and instruction, and practical experience. This presentation will help librarians develop strategies to advocate for their programs and their classroom space with in-house administration and can be applied to district administrators or even city and state level for library support as well as collaboratively when working with other teachers.

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The Re-education of Administration: Why every school administrator should be library certified.

  1. 1. The Re-education of Administration: IY libraries! what administrators need to know about the role of libraries, librarians and information literacy. Verlene Schafer - Southern Utah University ULA Conference 2013 - Aim for the Future: On Target with Vision and Advocacy
  2. 2. 2:00pm 12:00pm Many school administrators often underappreciate the role of the School Librarian and the Library Media Center. Some school administrators don’t know about the information literacy curriculum or assume it is being taught elsewhere. This is usually unintentional. So why does it happen? Why aren’t principals better library advocates?
  3. 3. Most school administrators have backgrounds in education and teaching. • Understanding of subject/grade level specific curriculum • Management experience • Understands fiscal responsibilities CONS PROS • Lots of classroom experience • Previous experiences with less dedicated librarians. • Lots of classroom experience, but little interaction with the library. • Not familiar with the library curriculum.
  4. 4. We need to teach them what it means to be a Librarian. If the administrator at your school has little or no experience with the library and its curriculum then it is our responsibility to re-educate them about what librarians do and what the library can do for the school… …but where do you begin?
  5. 5. Today we will use the Library Media Endorsement Program from SUU as our framework. Each area offers an opportunity for library media specialists to educate administrators about the role of libraries in the school and the responsibilities we manage on a daily basis. The goal being that what they understand and are a part of they can appreciate and value. Children’s Literature Technical Services Library Computer & Reference Skills Technology for Library Media Teachers Managing a Media Center Practical Experience
  6. 6. Children’s Literature Children’s literature is more than just story time! • There are specific skills and standards that need to be met for a student to be considered information literate at each grade level of education. • Library Media K-6 Core Curriculum • Library Media 7-12 Core Curriculum • The standards help develop critical thinking skills for students to apply in other courses outside of the library and critical life skills for continued learning. • Introduction to Information Literacy from ALA
  7. 7. Aren’t those skills taught elsewhere? YES! …And NO! Many information literacy skills are inherent in the other core courses • Often they are taught as course-specific skills. • Students often don’t know how to apply them to problems outside of the course structure. • Students use information-seeking strategies in most courses • This does not mean they are developing the critical thinking and evaluative skills they need to be information literate. Most classes teach the what… Librarians teach the how and why.
  8. 8. Information Literacy is more than checking out books. Most college freshmen: • Have difficulty developing good research questions. (Task Definition) • Aren’t aware of databases or know how to use them. (Information Seeking Strategies) • Cannot find books in the library catalog or on the shelf. (Location and Access) • Have difficulty understanding scholarly writing in journals. (Use of Information) • Present information without proper citation. (Synthesis) • Cannot effectively evaluate sources of information for accuracy, currency, authority, etc. (Evaluation)
  9. 9. Children’s Literature So, NO story time? Your principal may ask: Why Read Aloud to Children? • Children learn by hearing the stories and asking questions. • They learn to understand context better when an adult reads to them. • Plus, it’s just FUN, and getting students to enjoy reading can be taught by example. • Ask YOUR principal to share a book s/he loves during reading time. • Administrators are more likely to support a program if they are a part of it. • And story time is NOT just for Elementary students either!
  10. 10. Collection Development A good library collection is more than just popular reading materials and it is more than an extension of the curriculum. A balance needs to be found where students have access to educational and entertaining materials that will help them learn and develop as individuals as well as develop the information literacy skills needed for lifelong learning. With those skills they can find what they need to understand the curriculum.
  11. 11. …takes hard work. Finding a balance… • • • • • • Student-friendly Entertaining Print Books Diversity Buy what the students need (and want) • • • • • • Support the curriculum Educational Electronic Databases Controversial Keep within the constraints of the budget
  12. 12. What administrators need to know… Collection development takes time. • Random list from a book vendor = Weeding unused items • Careful selection now = Money saved later • Need to evaluate the needs of the school • Awareness of demographic being served • Does the collection support the school mission/vision? • This is a good place to ask for the administrator’s input!
  13. 13. Collection development takes cooperation. Collaboration with other teachers helps to personalize the collection • Ensures that the collection supports the curriculum in a specific assignment content-driven way • Not just a collection of materials that is generally related to grade-level content.
  14. 14. Collection development takes expertise. The librarian needs a strong knowledge of: • School-wide curriculum • Understanding of copyright • Management and use of databases and other electronic resources • Current trends in literature and technology • Equipment for access of materials • Etc.
  15. 15. For most of us the marc record is generated by the vendor or by a district cataloger, but record maintenance is still part of our job as we strive to make materials accessible to our students and faculty. Familiarity with the cataloging system is vital for: • • • • • • Editing keywords for increased searchability Inventory of materials Weeding Creating resource lists for faculty Educating students on searching techniques What else? Cataloging
  16. 16. Technology For Libraries The librarians role in technology is different than the role of the IT Department. For our purposes we are referring to the programs not the systems. The opportunities that librarians have to use technology are numerous. For today we will look at a few applications that administrators might find of benefit to the students and faculty. • Professional development • Web presence • Support Curriculum instruction and independent research
  17. 17. Technology For Libraries Professional development Many librarians hold regular professional development sessions with their faculty (as a whole or in small grade or content specific groups). What administrators need to know we can do for the school: • • In-depth understanding of the contents of databases as well as how to navigate them – • EBSCOhost Shared Folders and other tips. • Keyword v. Subject searching in databases • When they understand these skills they can reinforce these information literacy skills in their lessons. How to use media software/equipment – • Could be anything from streaming video to e-readers to the DVD player. These lessons can all be used for students too, or parents!
  18. 18. Technology For Libraries Creating a Web Presence A Librarian may make a website or it may be developed by IT but the content needs to be librarian-created. What a library website/blog/wiki can do for the school: Keep students and faculty aware of available resources. • New books list • Book lists/ database resources connected to specific educational units. • Read-alikes Provide a link to tutorials that students can access at home. • Database instructions • OPAC instructions • Research skills Promote the services of the school library media center. • Equipment • Resources • Teacher-Librarian collaboration
  19. 19. Managing a Media Center Besides managing curriculum, technology, professional development, and resources, librarian also often manage staff or student workers and community volunteers. When these aides are available they handle the general jobs like shelving and check-in/check-out so a librarian can focus on the professional responsibilities of teacher librarian like those listed above. This should not be an opportunity to task the librarian with non-library jobs.
  20. 20. Managing a Media Center In order for the library to function at its best it needs to have the support of everyone – students, parents, faculty and administration. In return the library can support students in their information literacy, parents helping students to continue their learning outside of the classroom, teachers with their curriculum and administrators by promoting a well-run, high performing school.
  21. 21. Practicum If we really want administrators to understand what librarians do we need to give them some experience. Imagine inviting your administrator to work in your library an hour a week. What would you have them do to help them understand the role of the teacher librarian?
  22. 22. Make a plan What do you think would work for your school? What ideas do you have? Where can you start?
  23. 23. Helpful information for further study: Websites: http://www.ala.org/aasl/advocacy/resources/position-statements/staffing http://www.schools.utah.gov/CURR/library/Core-Curriculum/K-6-Core-Curriculum/Strand1.aspx http://www.uen.org/core/core.do?courseNum=6512 http://www.ala.org/acrl/issues/infolit/overview/intro Articles: Felder, Richard M., and Rebecca Brent. "Learning by Doing." Chemical Engineering Education 37.4 (2003): 282-83. North Carolina State University. Web. 26 Apr. 2013. Johnson, D. (2002). The Seven most critical challenges facing our profession. Teacher Librarian, 29(5), 21. Morris, B. J., & Packard, A. (2007). The Principal's support of classroom teacher-media specialist collaboration. School Libraries Worldwide, 13(1), 36-55. Shannon, D. M. (2012). Perceptions of school library programs and school librarians. Teacher Librarian, 39(3), 17-22. Schmidt, C. (2007). Whine or woo--which describes you? (and be honest with yourself). Teacher Librarian, 35(1), 73-74. Torres, N. (2001). When librarians become computer technicians. Library Talk, 14(5), 32.
  24. 24. Infographics A great way to convey important information. Here are some you can use when talking to your school administrator: Demonstrates attitudes of college students about libraries – or why we need better information literacy instruction in our schools! • http://ajhead1.wordpress.com/about/ What should an administrator expect a school library media specialist to be? • http://www.flickr.com/photos/60403872@N04/6810844256/sizes/o/in/photostream/ What do Teacher Librarians Teach? • http://alturl.com/coth4 27 Things Your Teacher Librarian Does • http://anethicalisland.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/teacherlibrarian.png School Libraries and Student Achievement • http://www.lrs.org/documents/school/school_library_impact.jpg School Libraries: A lesson in student success • http://alturl.com/b2eup The Times, They are a Changin’ • http://yourteacherlibrarian.wikispaces.com/Are+You+Ready% 3F From AASL • http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/aaslissues/advocacy/AASL_infographic.pdf Make one for your own school using Piktochart!
  25. 25. Contact me with any comments or questions: Verlene Schafer Southern Utah University verleneschafer@suu.edu 435-592-2851 Thanks for attending and participating today!

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