In Concert:
An Integrated Reading and Writing Approach
by Kathleen T. McWhorter

Part Two:
Reading, Writing, and Organizin...
Chapter 6: Details, Transitions, and Implied Main Ideas

Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
Important Terms to Remember:
1. Supporting Details
2. Transitions
3. Implied Main Ideas

Helpful Tips:
• As a reader, exam...
Important Terms to Remember:

1. Supporting Details
2. Major Details
3. Minor Details
What are some types of details?

Cop...
Types of Details:
• Facts
• Examples
• Reasons

• Statistics
• Descriptions
• Steps
• Procedures
Copyright 2014 by Pearson...
How do I think critically about details?
Consider:

• Writers cannot list every possible detail
• Writers must choose the ...
Transitions are linking words or phrases that
lead the reader from one idea to another idea.
Helpful Tips:
• Recognizing a...
The implied main idea is unstated, and it is up
to the reader to use details in the paragraph to
figure out the main point...
Strategies for Identifying the
Implied Main Idea:
1. Find the topic

2. Figure out what is the most important idea
the wri...
Details should be relevant and sufficient:
• Relevant details directly explain and support the
topic sentence.
• Sufficien...
Transitional words allow readers to move easily
from one detail to another, showing how the
details relate.
Helpful Tip:
T...
Other Important Terms to Remember:
1. Time Sequence
2. Spatial Arrangement

3. Least/Most Arrangement
4. Specific Words

C...
Goal 1: Understand Details, Transitions,
and Implied Main Ideas

Review Questions
True or False:
Transitions are words or ...
Goal 1: Understand Details, Transitions,
and Implied Main Ideas

Review Questions
True or False:
True: Transitions are wor...
Goal 2: Identify Supporting Details
Review Questions
Which of the following is NOT a type of detail?

A. Reasons
B. Photog...
Goal 2: Identify Supporting Details
Review Questions
Which of the following is NOT a type of detail?

A. Reasons
B. Photog...
Goal 3: Think Critically About Details
Review Questions
True or False:
Writers should include every possible detail they
c...
Goal 3: Think Critically About Details
Review Questions
True or False:
False: Writers should include every possible detail...
Goal 4: Use Transitions to Guide Your Reading
Review Questions
Which of the following do transitions NOT do?

A. Lead the ...
Goal 4: Use Transitions to Guide Your Reading
Review Questions
Which of the following do transitions NOT do?

A. Lead the ...
Goal 5: Find Implied Main Ideas
Review Questions
Which of the following is an effective strategy
for identifying the impli...
Goal 5: Find Implied Main Ideas
Review Questions
Which of the following is an effective strategy
for identifying the impli...
Goal 6: Select and Organize Details to
Support Your Topic Sentence
Review Questions
True or False:
Relevant details explai...
Goal 6: Select and Organize Details to
Support Your Topic Sentence
Review Questions
True or False:
False: Relevant details...
Goal 7: Use Transitional Words and
Phrases to Connect Details
Review Questions
Which of the following is a method of
trans...
Goal 7: Use Transitional Words and
Phrases to Connect Details
Review Questions
Which of the following is a method of
trans...
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IRW Chapter 6

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  • Supporting details are facts and/or ideas that explain the main idea of a paragraph expressed in the topic sentence.Transitions are linking words and phrases that connect details and pull the paper together.Implied main ideas are thoughts suggested, but not directly stated, in a topic sentence.Don’t forget to think about how to apply these terms separately to reading and writing!
  • Supporting details are facts and examples that prove or explain the main idea of a paragraph.Major details directly explain the main idea of a paragraph.Minor details provide additional ideas and information that explain the major details.The types of details can be placed into an idea map in the reading or writing process. For an example, see the paragraphs and figures 6-1 and 6-2 on pages 173–174.Activities for Identifying Major/Minor Details: Exercises 6-1 & 6-2: pages 174–181
  • Activities for Identifying Types of Details:Exercises 6-3 & 6-4 on pages 181–183Additional Activity:As a peer review, have students highlight and identify the different types of details in their own paragraphs.
  • As a reader, examine the details the writer chose to include. Are they the best examples? What other examples might have been included? Did the writer make a strong case with the details? Did he or she influence you?As a writer, review your wording carefully to make sure you fully explain your main point with the details you choose. Don’t choose words that are ambiguous. Make sure the details you use are those that best explain your main idea.
  • Remember that transitions are linking words or phrases that lead the reader from one idea to another idea.Recognizing and using transitions will help guide you through a paragraph, making it easier to read or to write (see the paragraph example on page 185).See Table 6-1 on page 185 for a list of the different types of transitional words/phrases and what they tell the reader. Activities: Exercises 6-6 (Choosing Transitional Words) and 6-7 (Making Predictions) on pages 185–187.
  • Use our previous lessons to locate the topic.Look at all the details and try to decide what the larger idea being explained in the paragraph might be.Using your own words, try to state the main idea in reasonable terms. Be sure it applies to all the details in the paragraph.Activities:Exercises 6-8 (Locating Implied Meaning in Paragraphs) and 6-9 (Analyzing Paragraphs) on pages 189–191.For reference, see the paragraph and visual examples on page 188.
  • Relevant details directly explain and support the topic sentence. They help clarify and strengthen ideas. Irrelevant ideas make your points unclear.Sufficient details provide enough information to make your topic sentence understandable and convincing. Your supporting details must thoroughly explain why you believe the topic sentence is true. Details should be specific, not summaries or unsupported opinions. Details explain who, why, where, when, what, and how. They do not make general statements.Activity:Exercise 6-13 (Writing Supporting Details) on page 194.
  • See the sample paragraph and figure 6-2 on page 199 for examples of frequently used transitional words and phrases.
  • Time sequence: Arranging ideas in the order that they happenSpatial arrangement: Arranging ideas according to their position in spaceLeast/most arrangement: Presenting ideas from least important to most important and vice versaSpecific words: Words that provide a great deal of informationActivity:Split the class into groups. Using the student essay, “The China Bug,” by Jim Sturm on page 200, assign each group 1-2 paragraphs. Require the groups to identify the transitional words and phrases within their respective paragraphs. The results can be used for class discussion or an online discussion post as a follow-up activity.
  • Answer:TrueFalse: The implied main idea is suggested
  • Answer:TrueFalse: The implied main idea is suggested
  • Answer: B—Photographs are a visual, not a detail.
  • Answer: B—Photographs are a visual, not a detail.
  • Answers:False—they must pick the most relevant details that best explain the main idea.True
  • Answers:False—they must pick the most relevant details that best explain the main idea.True
  • Answer: C
  • Answer: C
  • Answer: C
  • Answer: C
  • Answers:False: Relevant details explain the topic sentence/main idea of a paragraph.True
  • Answers:False: Relevant details explain the topic sentence/main idea of a paragraph.True
  • Answer: D
  • Answer: D
  • IRW Chapter 6

    1. 1. In Concert: An Integrated Reading and Writing Approach by Kathleen T. McWhorter Part Two: Reading, Writing, and Organizing Paragraphs Chapter 6: Details, Transitions, and Implied Main Ideas PowerPoint by Sarah Gilliam, Instructor of English Mountain Empire Community College
    2. 2. Chapter 6: Details, Transitions, and Implied Main Ideas Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    3. 3. Important Terms to Remember: 1. Supporting Details 2. Transitions 3. Implied Main Ideas Helpful Tips: • As a reader, examine how details support a topic sentence. • As a writer, select the appropriate details to support your topic sentence. Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    4. 4. Important Terms to Remember: 1. Supporting Details 2. Major Details 3. Minor Details What are some types of details? Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    5. 5. Types of Details: • Facts • Examples • Reasons • Statistics • Descriptions • Steps • Procedures Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    6. 6. How do I think critically about details? Consider: • Writers cannot list every possible detail • Writers must choose the most important details to include Helpful Tips: • As a reader, consider if the writer could have chosen better details • As a writer, try to choose the details most relevant to your main idea Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    7. 7. Transitions are linking words or phrases that lead the reader from one idea to another idea. Helpful Tips: • Recognizing and using transitions will help guide you through a paragraph, making it easier to read or to write. • Transitions also alert the reader to what will come in the next paragraph. Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    8. 8. The implied main idea is unstated, and it is up to the reader to use details in the paragraph to figure out the main point. What are some strategies for identifying the implied main idea of a paragraph? Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    9. 9. Strategies for Identifying the Implied Main Idea: 1. Find the topic 2. Figure out what is the most important idea the writer wants you to know about the topic 3. Express the main idea in your own words Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    10. 10. Details should be relevant and sufficient: • Relevant details directly explain and support the topic sentence. • Sufficient details provide enough information to make your topic sentence understandable and convincing. Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    11. 11. Transitional words allow readers to move easily from one detail to another, showing how the details relate. Helpful Tip: Think of transitions as words and phrases that guide the reader through the paragraph and signal what is to come in the next one. Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    12. 12. Other Important Terms to Remember: 1. Time Sequence 2. Spatial Arrangement 3. Least/Most Arrangement 4. Specific Words Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    13. 13. Goal 1: Understand Details, Transitions, and Implied Main Ideas Review Questions True or False: Transitions are words or phrases that connect details and pull a paragraph together. True or False: The implied main idea is directly stated.
    14. 14. Goal 1: Understand Details, Transitions, and Implied Main Ideas Review Questions True or False: True: Transitions are words or phrases that connect details and pull a paragraph together. True or False: False: The implied main idea is directly stated.
    15. 15. Goal 2: Identify Supporting Details Review Questions Which of the following is NOT a type of detail? A. Reasons B. Photographs C. Statistics D. Examples
    16. 16. Goal 2: Identify Supporting Details Review Questions Which of the following is NOT a type of detail? A. Reasons B. Photographs C. Statistics D. Examples
    17. 17. Goal 3: Think Critically About Details Review Questions True or False: Writers should include every possible detail they can think of in their paragraphs. True or False: Good readers consider details the author of the writing may have left out.
    18. 18. Goal 3: Think Critically About Details Review Questions True or False: False: Writers should include every possible detail they can think of in their paragraphs. True or False: True: Good readers consider details the author of the writing may have left out.
    19. 19. Goal 4: Use Transitions to Guide Your Reading Review Questions Which of the following do transitions NOT do? A. Lead the reader from one idea to another B. Transition readers to the information in the next paragraph C. Review information in all the previous paragraphs
    20. 20. Goal 4: Use Transitions to Guide Your Reading Review Questions Which of the following do transitions NOT do? A. Lead the reader from one idea to another B. Transition readers to the information in the next paragraph C. Review information in all the previous paragraphs
    21. 21. Goal 5: Find Implied Main Ideas Review Questions Which of the following is an effective strategy for identifying the implied main idea? A. Choose the first sentence of the paragraph. B. Look for transitions. C. Identify the topic and try to determine the idea the author is trying to relay. D. All of the above.
    22. 22. Goal 5: Find Implied Main Ideas Review Questions Which of the following is an effective strategy for identifying the implied main idea? A. Choose the first sentence of the paragraph. B. Look for transitions. C. Identify the topic and try to determine the idea the author is trying to relay. D. All of the above.
    23. 23. Goal 6: Select and Organize Details to Support Your Topic Sentence Review Questions True or False: Relevant details explain the transitions in the paragraph. True or False: Sufficient details provide enough information to make the topic sentence understandable.
    24. 24. Goal 6: Select and Organize Details to Support Your Topic Sentence Review Questions True or False: False: Relevant details explain the transitions in the paragraph. True or False: True: Sufficient details provide enough information to make the topic sentence understandable.
    25. 25. Goal 7: Use Transitional Words and Phrases to Connect Details Review Questions Which of the following is a method of transition? A. Spatial arrangement B. Time sequence C. Least/most arrangement D. All of the above
    26. 26. Goal 7: Use Transitional Words and Phrases to Connect Details Review Questions Which of the following is a method of transition? A. Spatial arrangement B. Time sequence C. Least/most arrangement D. All of the above

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