Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

NAB 2019: Multi-Camera & Live Streaming Productions (Traditional & VR Cameras) Field Workshop

140 views

Published on

Taught by John Dudley and Richard Harrington

This field workshop helps you master the complete workflow for professional video streaming. You'll learn everything from planning to final delivery for covering live events in remote locations. Join top experts John Dudley, Rich Harrington, and special guests as they guide you through the process of capturing a multi-camera event and streaming it online. This is an on-location workshop where you’ll get to observe a working set and see equipment in use, at a music venue in Las Vegas (The Space - 3460 Cavaretta Ct) where the group will meet directly.





This workshop allows attendees to try out a variety of equipment and get real-world experience. The class will end with a hands-on period, where attendees can test the equipment used during the workshop and get customized questions answered.

Published in: Technology
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

NAB 2019: Multi-Camera & Live Streaming Productions (Traditional & VR Cameras) Field Workshop

  1. 1. Thank you to our sponsors!
  2. 2. Thank you to our sponsors!
  3. 3. Multi-Camera & Live Streaming Productions Field Workshop John Dudley & Rich Harrington
  4. 4. Workshop Description • This field workshop helps you master the complete workflow for professional video streaming. • You'll learn everything from planning to final delivery for covering live events in remote locations. • Join top experts John Dudley, Rich Harrington, and special guests as they guide you through the process of capturing a multi-camera event and streaming it online.
  5. 5. Workshop Description • This workshop allows attendees to try out a variety of equipment and get real-world experience. • The class will end with a hands-on period, where attendees can test the equipment used during the workshop and get customized questions answered.
  6. 6. Schedule • 12:00 Attendee Announced Arrival • 12:30 Start Programming • 1:30 Band Arrives • 4:15 Concert • 5:15 Stop with Band • 5:30 Attendees Wrap • 6:00 Hard Stop • 6:30 Tiki Bar
  7. 7. Agenda • Pre-production planning and location scouting • Setting up cameras for multiple angles of coverage • Developing and executing an audio strategy • Setting up a physical switcher and using software switchers • Single Camera Solution • Hardware Solution • Mobile Solution
  8. 8. Agenda • Directing your multi-camera, light and sound team • VR camera options to cover live events • Hosting Strategies • Put it into Action • Wrap • Strike • Load out • Social Hour
  9. 9. Meet the Team
  10. 10. Rich Harrington • Author 40+ Books • Author 150+ Video Courses • Conference Speaker • Business Owner • Director • Photographer
  11. 11. Consultant • Work with a variety of high-tech clients • Consultant to television networks for broadcast workflow • Combine technical expertise with project management knowledge • Manage migration and audience growth
  12. 12. John Dudley • Founder of Dudley Digital Works and president of DC Webcasting. • His live streaming client portfolio spans over a decade and includes Pfizer, Abbott, the European Union Delegation to the United States, and the ALS Association. • Prior to founding Dudley Digital Works in 2004, John served with Washington, D.C., healthcare agency Spectrum Science Communications, managing and executing brand and public policy campaigns for global biopharma industry and association clients. • A graduate of the College of Saint Rose, John began his career in 2000 as a producer and technical director for New York State Senate Media Services in Albany, NY
  13. 13. Hillary Shea • Producer @ RHED Pixel • Secretary, Women in Film and Video – Washington DC • Managing Editor Spotlight on Screenwriters • JMU Almuna
  14. 14. Eric Quigley • Producer/Editor • Dudley Digital Works
  15. 15. Pre-production planning and location scouting
  16. 16. Pre-production planning and location scouting • Walking through the venue • Things to consider • Connectivity requirements
  17. 17. What is Location Scouting? • A thorough review of locations to determine the best fit for the production • An opportunity to discover potential risks and opportunities • A chance to improve creative inspiration • Vital to the preproduction process • Your first talent
  18. 18. URBAN LOCATION 03 The Purpose • Productions are expensive ventures, you want to maximize productivity • Find the location that meets your target demographic and goal of the project • Takes the concept from paper to life • Allows the ability to have a game plan in advance, schedule, shot list, etc.
  19. 19. Technical • How • Gear needed • Crew needed • Special considerations • Test shots
  20. 20. Logistics • Where • Location to shoot • Location to stage • When • Best time of day for light • Best time of day for sound • Location availability
  21. 21. Creative • What • What needs to be captured • What should be shown • Why • What does the location do the accentuate the scene or story
  22. 22. What to Accomplish On Your Survey
  23. 23. Technical • Find the main power box • Identify power distribution throughout the building • Locate building engineer • Identify necessary connectors for power
  24. 24. Technical • Examine fuses & identify maximum load for circuits • Check if wall sockets are grounded • Check wall outlets with circuit testers • Determine cable runs and amount of cable needed
  25. 25. Sun Calculations • Determine sunpath for given shoot day • Determine shadow heights 
 (if needed) for specific times of day • Identify sunrise, twilight, 
 dusk, and sunset • Use software or application
  26. 26. Weather • Weather forecasts • Backup location if shooting outdoors • Staging area for gear and crew • Facilities for crew • Rain gear • Pop-up tents for protecting gear and crew
  27. 27. Sound Considerations • Listen for extraneous sounds that may be present on shoot day • Fire Station / Hospital / Train Tracks /Flight Path • Record room tone for analysis • Determine if HVAC can be controlled • Evaluate control via scheduling 
 time of day
  28. 28. Access • Timeframe you can have access to the location • Areas that are off limits • Loading dock • Practical lighting
  29. 29. Location Considerations
  30. 30. Location Considerations • Where will you park vehicles? • Is a permit required? • Additional permissions needed • Preservation steps needed • Where will gear be staged
  31. 31. Location Considerations • Identify food or craft services options • Identify power sources • Determine schedule for access
  32. 32. Sound Considerations • Listen for extraneous sounds that may be present during shoot day • Record room tone for analysis • Determine if you can control HVAC • Evaluate control via scheduling 
 time of day
  33. 33. Setting up cameras for multiple angles of coverage
  34. 34. Setting up cameras for multiple angles of coverage • Getting adequate coverage • How much is too much? • Chasing the action • Dealing with crowds/IRL attendees • Camera considerations • Lighting for multi-camera events
  35. 35. Studio B Our Basic Studio
  36. 36. twitter.com/ rhedpixellynda.com
  37. 37. Media Factory Studios Our Full-Service Studio
  38. 38. The Multicamera Process
  39. 39. The Process • Plan for the shoot • Address Timecode Issues • Address Color Management • Log & Digitize • Synchronize • Create Multi-clips • Edit
  40. 40. The Purpose • Productions are expensive ventures, you want to maximize productivity • Preplanning asks the questions and determines the solutions before that expensive day comes • Takes the concept on paper and puts a real world face on it • Have a game plan in advance, schedule, shot list, etc.
  41. 41. Planning the Shoot • Map out coverage • Use a floor plan • Make sure you have enough power • Plan for lighting • Identify shooting format, codecs, frame size, etc.
  42. 42. Timecode Solutions • Studio cameras with house sync • Time of Day timecode • Slave cameras together • Use a clapboard • Audio sync point • Visual sync point
  43. 43. Production Advice
  44. 44. Camera Positions • Best angle • Shot variety • Safety of crew • Safety of gear • Not obstructing the location • Disposable cameras
  45. 45. Creative • What • What needs to be captured • What should be shown • Why • What does the location do the accentuate the scene or story
  46. 46. Lens selection • Fixed lens camera • Zoom lens • Prime lenses • Wide angle • Special housing
  47. 47. Lighting decisions • Determine existing and practicals • Budget for additional lights and crew • Style of shooting • Multi-camera • Mood
  48. 48. Rigging Issues • Preservation of location • Safety of crew and talent • Safety equipment
  49. 49. STAGE Cam 3 Cam 4 Cam 6 Cam 2 Cam 1 Cam 7 Wide Shot Hand- Held CUs MS Lead Singer 2-Shot Stage Right 2-Shot Stage Left Cam 5 Hand- Held CUs AUDIO BOOTH HOUSE AUDIO Jib Shot
  50. 50. MommyCast • Established Audio Podcast • Three-Camera Studio Shoot • Multi-Camera Field Segments • Produced in High-Definition • Talk Show Format
  51. 51. Developing and executing an audio strategy
  52. 52. Developing and executing an audio strategy • Using existing audio at venue • What is the right mix • Capturing sound at the event • Requirements for delivery

  53. 53. House sound 
 is different from
 broadcast audio
  54. 54. Setting up a physical switcher and using software switchers
  55. 55. Single Camera Solution
  56. 56. Single Camera Solution • Ideal for small crew/single operator • Gear • Camera • Tripod • Encoder • Laptop • Internet Connection • Two source switch if needed • Streaming via FB Live or YouTube

  57. 57. Getting Setup
  58. 58. SDI PGM OUT STEREO IN L USB WEB CAM HDMI LOOP OUT R HDMI IN SDI IN SDI LOOPOUT LINE/MIC IN ANALOG AUDIO IN
  59. 59. Plugging in Video • Plug your source video into the Blackmagic Web Presenter’s SDI or HDMI video inputs. • There are both loop SDI and loop HDMI outputs and you can use these outputs if you want to connect Web Presenter in line with a video connection to other equipment. • For example, you could loop the SDI output to a deck or monitor or you could connect Web Presenter in between a computer’s HDMI output and the HDMI input of a video projector.
  60. 60. Plugging in Video • There is also a program SDI output and this will output video after the SDI and HDMI switch, but before the down conversion to 720p video. • This SDI program output is the same resolution as the video inputs, so is perfect for connecting to a deck for master recording.
  61. 61. Plugging in Video • Blackmagic Web Presenter supports 12G-SDI and will automatically switch between SD, HD and Ultra HD all the way up to 2160p60 when the video input changes. • You can input virtually any video signal and it will convert the signal to 720p video for the USB video, which is both high quality but also very low data rate for streaming video. • What this means is you can do your production in higher resolution 1080 HD or Ultra HD but the web presenter will take care of lowering the resolution and frame rate for you, all within the single unit.
  62. 62. SDI PGM OUT STEREO IN L USB WEB CAM HDMI LOOP OUT R HDMI IN SDI IN SDI LOOPOUT LINE/MIC IN ANALOG AUDIO IN
  63. 63. Plugging in Audio • The SDI and HDMI inputs include audio, however there are also 2 additional analog audio inputs. • The XLR audio input is a mono input that lets you plug in microphones. It’s a single channel mono input because microphones are mono and when you connect to this balanced XLR audio input the audio will be sent to both left and right audio channels internally. • The second analog audio input is a HiFi input using RCA connectors. • This input is good for computer audio or audio from a music source such as smartphone, music player, audio mixer or even a CD player.
  64. 64. Plugging in Audio • All audio sources will be connected to an internal stereo audio mixer and all blended together. • If you don’t want audio to be included from any specific audio source, then please ensure you disconnect the analog audio sources, or turn down audio from HDMI sources such as computers. • Otherwise any audio on any of the inputs will be blended together and sent to the USB audio output.
  65. 65. Reducing Audio Interference • Remove cellphone from area • Disable cell reception • Avoid microphones crossing power cables • Turn off connected drives and extra devices
  66. 66. SDI PGM OUT STEREO IN L USB WEB CAM HDMI LOOP OUT R HDMI IN SDI IN SDI LOOPOUT LINE/MIC IN ANALOG AUDIO IN
  67. 67. Connecting to your Computer • Now that you have plugged in your video and audio sources, connect your Blackmagic • Web Presenter to your computer via its USB port. Your computer will instantly recognize the unit as a USB webcam source.
  68. 68. Using Teranex Mini Smart Panel
  69. 69. Using Teranex Mini Smart Panel • An optional Teranex Mini Smart Panel can be mounted to the front of your Web Presenter, replacing the original front panel. • The Smart Panel buttons allow you to switch sources, together with a built in LCD so you can monitor the input video and status information, such as the input video source, video format, plus the USB output frame rate.
  70. 70. 1 MENU Source Video Format USB 1 MENU HDMI 525i59.94 NTSC 30 fps 2 VIDEO 2 VIDEO SET AUDIO SET AUDIO
  71. 71. Installing the Teranex Mini Smart Panel • Installing your optional Smart Panel is easy and because the panels are hot swappable, you don’t even need to turn off your Blackmagic Web Presenter when installing it. • Remove the two M3 screws on each side of your Web Presenter’s basic front panel using a Pozidriv 2 screwdriver and gently pull the panel away from the front of your Web Presenter.
  72. 72. Installing the Teranex Mini Smart Panel • On the inside of the basic panel, you’ll notice a small clear plastic tube attached to the bottom corner. • This tube directs light from the LED inside the Web Presenter toilluminate the status indicator on the basic panel. • This tube should stay attached to the basic front panel.
  73. 73. Installing the Teranex Mini Smart Panel • Align the connector on the rear of the Smart Panel with the adjoining connector on the face of your Blackmagic Web Presenter and gently push the Smart Panel towards the unit until the connectors are firmly seated. • The Smart Panel should make a firm connection and fit neatly inside the face of your Web Presenter. • Re-insert the M3 screws from the original panel.
  74. 74. 1 2
  75. 75. Control Buttons • When the smart panel is attached, the switching feature is enabled on your Blackmagic Web Presenter. This means when you are broadcasting, you can press buttons 1 and 2 to switch between the SDI and HDMI input sources. • Pressing ‘1’ will select the SDI input, and pressing ‘2’ will select the HDMI input.
  76. 76. An Overview of Facebook Live
  77. 77. Hardware Solution
  78. 78. Hardware Solution • Hardware options • Connectivity • Benefits of hardware • Operation Strategies

  79. 79. Testing Picture and Sound • Check all cables • Ensure adequate lighting • Do a test recording • Perform a test stream • Watch test on a second computer • Watch test on a mobile device
  80. 80. Monitoring on a Second Computer • Never watch on same computer as presenting • Load a stream to see what audience sees • Be sure to mute the volume to avoid an echo loop • Have headphones plugged in so you can do a test listen
  81. 81. Setting Up Your Computer
  82. 82. Internet Connection Options • Ethernet • Generally the fastest connection • Less prone to interference • Wi-Fi • Ubiquitous, but has many potential issues • Cellular • Should be seen as a backup
  83. 83. Get Yourself Connected 1. Hardwired Ethernet 2. Wireless (WiFi)
  84. 84. Get Yourself Connected 3. 4G Bonded Cellular 4. Via Satellite Uplink
  85. 85. Bonded Solutions • Broadcast using cellular connection • DataBridge or encoding solutions • Signal spread across multiple networks • Highly portable • Data Plan / cloud platform needed
  86. 86. Bonded Solutions • LiveU LU600 • 7 modems • DataBridge • Encoder
  87. 87. Minimizing Data Transfer • Turn off syncing software • Cloud storage • Photo streams • Turn off data transfers • Network copies • Stop downloads/uploads
  88. 88. Minimizing Data Transfer • Check for activity on network • Is a dedicated line an option? • Reduce number of connected devices • Check Activity Monitor on a Mac • Check Resource Monitor and Task Manager on a PC
  89. 89. Reducing Audio Interference • Remove cellphone from area • Disable cell reception • Avoid microphones crossing power cables • Turn off connected drives and extra devices • Fans/AC/mechanical
  90. 90. Live Streaming Tools
  91. 91. Live Streaming Tools • OBS Studio  • Mac, PC & Linux, Free, Open Source • https://obsproject.com/ • Wirecast  • Mac & PC, from $495 • https://www.telestream.net/wirecast/
  92. 92. http://www.urlgoeshere.com Title Text
  93. 93. Live Streaming Tools • Ecamm Live • Mac only, $29.95 • http://www.ecamm.com/mac/ecammlive/ • BeLive • FREE, web app with guests and multiple camera angles • https://belive.tv
  94. 94. Live Streaming Tools • mimoLive  • Mac only - $199/year for personal use, from $699/year for commercial • https://boinx.com/mimolive/ • Lightstream • web app, currently free • https://www.golightstream.com/facebook/
  95. 95. Live Streaming Tools • BlueJeans onSocial  • Web app - initial price $39.95/mth for live meetings with up to 25 guests and live streaming to Facebook • https://www.bluejeans.com/onsocial • Zoom • Mac & PC - Facebook integration on paid version with Webinar bolt-on - from $14.99+ $40/month upwards • www.zoom.us
  96. 96. Mobile Solutions
  97. 97. Mobile Solutions • DJI Osmo for mobile streaming • MEVO for mobile streaming • LumeCube
  98. 98. Directing your multi-camera, light and sound team
  99. 99. Directing your multi-camera, light and sound team • Strategies for direction • Crew communication options • Rehearsal strategies 

  100. 100. VR camera options to cover live events
  101. 101. VR camera options to cover live events • Realtime stitching solutions • Insta360 • Connectivity • Power • Using Mobile Apps • Mounting Strategies

  102. 102. Hosting Strategies
  103. 103. Hosting Strategies • Using common hosting platforms like Facebook, YouTube, and Twitch • Setting up private streaming with additional prosumer & enterprise platforms (Vimeo Account)

  104. 104. What’s the
 best channel?
  105. 105. Choosing the Right Platform Who’s the target audience? Is the content for public consumption? Do you need to control access? What are the analytics requirements?
  106. 106. Free & Social CDNs Pros • No subscription fees = FREE • Built-in Audience • Robust and stable global networks • Automated marketing options • Built in on-demand features
  107. 107. Free & Social CDNs Cons • Geared toward consumers • Higher risk of being blocked by IT • Resolution & recording constraints • Limited backend support
  108. 108. Max Resolution of 3840 x 2160 – 60fps
  109. 109. Max Resolution of 1280 x 720 – 30fps
  110. 110. Max Resolution of 1280 x 720– 30fps
  111. 111. Subscription/Enterprise CDNs Pros • Provide maximum control • Ideal when limiting viewer access • Work well in restrictive IT environments • Feature live backend support
  112. 112. Subscription/Enterprise CDNs Cons • Subscription / License = NOT FREE • Less user-friendly for beginners • On-Demand hosting comes at a price
  113. 113. Must have Vimeo Premium account • $75 per month / billed annually • Unlimited live streaming • Customizable Vimeo Player • Powerful analytics tools
  114. 114. Now paired with Vimeo • $75 per month / billed annually • $199 month to month • Enterprise solutions – no pricing
  115. 115. Akamai Media Services Live • Used by broadcast entities • Ideal for high volume • Sold via resellers • Serious Investment • Live custom support • The Cadillac CDN plan
  116. 116. You get what 
 you pay for.
  117. 117. Can I push to multiple CDNs at once?
  118. 118. Cloud Based Solutions
  119. 119. Connection Speed • Minimum bandwidth required • Outbound 15 mbps • Inbound 15 mbps • Ideal bandwidth • Outbound 25+ mbps • Inbound 25+ mbps
  120. 120. Going Live
  121. 121. Monitoring on a Second Computer • Never watch on same computer as presenting • Load a stream to see what audience sees • Be sure to mute the volume to avoid an echo loop • Have headphones plugged in so you can do a test listen
  122. 122. Testing Picture and Sound • Check all cables • Ensure adequate lighting • Do a test recording • Perform a test stream • Watch test on a second computer • Watch test on a mobile device
  123. 123. Put it into Action
  124. 124. Wrap
  125. 125. Thank you to our sponsors!
  126. 126. The Golden Tiki thegoldentiki.com +1 (702) 222-3196 Address 3939 Spring Mountain Rd Las Vegas, NV 89102
  127. 127. Multi-Camera & Live Streaming Productions Field Workshop John Dudley & Rich Harrington

×