Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
THELIBRARY
CHAPTER1
Lightroom is a powerful manager of digital
photography. The heart of it is the Library
Module. Work in the rest of the mod...
DATABASE
Lightroom is at its core a database. It stores all of the information about a
photograph. From the camera setting...
THE TOUR
The Library module screen is divided into
two sidebars—one on the right and one
on the left, an Image Display are...
LEFT SIDEBAR PANELS
Navigator—shows the current selected photograph. Mouse over a folder in the
Folders panel to display t...
RIGHT SIDEBAR PANELS
The right sidebar is all about adding info to photographs in the database. 

It begins with the Histo...
There two panels that support keywords: Keywording and
Keyword List.
Keywording is the entry point. Add keywords in the en...
LIBRARY MODULE MODES
There are five modes in the Library module: Grid (G), Enlarge (E), Compare (C),
Survey (N) and People ...
Lightroom calls its database a catalog. There
is huge debate about the best way to
organize photographs. The debate is sim...
Think about your catalog of photographs as if it were your calendar. Answer this
question: How many calendars do you have?...
Lightroom creates a folder with the Lightroom catalog with the extension .lrcat It
also creates the preview data file. Its ...
IMPORT A CATALOG
After the project like my European adventure is complete, I bring my temporary
catalog and its accompanyi...
MANY
CATALOG
S
Should I have a single Lightroom catalog or
should I have many?  That was the the first
question I asked bac...
At first, someone started a rumor and said Lightroom can handle a maximum of 15
thousand images before performance was affe...
A CASE FOR MULTIPLE CATALOGS
Being a generalist photographer, my photography spanned a wide range. One
week I would photog...
SINGLE CATALOG SOLUTION
Since I switched to a single catalog solution my Lightoom experience has become
very simple. After...
It’s important to remember that Lightroom doesn’t
have your photographs in it.Your photographs
reside on your hard drive, ...
Lightroom is so powerful for organizing and finishing your photographs, and the
first step is to import photographs into Lig...
CHOOSE THE IMPORT SOURCE
Basically, you start on the left, and work to the right. At the top left is says Select a
source,...
Copy as DNG: New for Lr CC: This makes a new copy of the images from your
card on your computer or hard drive and converts...
While in the Loupe view you can zoom in to check sharpness. Just use the slider
in the bottom right corner.

CHOOSE WHERE ...
FILE HANDLING
Build Previews: Standard After the pictures import, Lightroom will create a
preview of the file on the hard d...
Don’t Import Suspected Duplicates: Checked This is really good. It simply
allows Lightroom to recognize pictures that you’...
FILE RENAMING
Rename Files: Checked I like to rename my files as I import them. If you’ve read
Kevin’s chapter about Lightr...
Start Number: 1…or not I usually start at number 1, but if I’m importing the
second card full from a shoot, then I might c...
Metadata: My Personal Preset This is really cool. Metadata is non-visual
information in your picture file. I said I use the...
DESTINATION
Super Simple method: Arrow at the top The simplest way to tell Lightroom where
you want your pictures to go is...
A QUICK SANITY SAVER
LIBRARY:CATALOG TAB: PREVIOUS IMPORT
A quick note about the view you see as your pictures import. You...
When making photographs in the studio I
shoot tethered into an external drive plugged
into an older MacPro on a rolling An...
IMPORTING FROM A FOLDER
Chances are you have images already in a folder and organized. These are easy
to import into Light...
Tethered shooting is the digital equivalent of
taking a Polaroid® in the days of film. Back
then, Polaroids were used to ch...
Today, professional photographers shoot directly into a computer. The monitor
performs all of the functions that the Polar...
Step Three: Naming is next. I’ve created a preset that provides a field for custom
text, in this case 2889. The Start Numbe...
Once the first photo appears in Lightroom, tap E to enlarge it then look at it. While
looking learn to actually “see” what’...
I don’t erase my memory cards until I have at
least 2 copies of my photos. One of the best
time-savers is to let Lightroom...
Inside the import window, Lightroom makes it super-easy to create a second copy.
It’s always best to make sure you’re back...
The last option says “Make a Second Copy To:” with a dropdown arrow. Put a
checkmark in the box and click the dropdown arr...
You can user folders, just like in a file
cabinet or on your computer’s hard drive to
keep your images organized.
S E C T I...
Normally, I work without any subfolders in Lightroom. When it’s time to sort
photographs I use Collections. Collections ca...
Unless you are working with other
photographers in a network environment, the
first rule in creating a catalog is to develo...
I’ve found it best to write a brief sentence that describes your type of photography
and what, where, or who you photograp...
SPORTS PHOTOGRAPHER
Our Sports photographer photographs a wide range of sports and sport teams.
The common denominator is ...
NATURE PHOTOGRAPHER
Our Nature photographer photographs all types birds. The common denominator
is name. However, our phot...
I like file trees. They just make sense. At a
glance I can see that this image is inside
this folder which is in this folde...
WHAT’S A HARD DRIVE?
You’ll find that you can’t add a hard drive that doesn’t have any pictures on it. If
you’re planning t...
DROBO MINI
Next, I have hard drives like the Drobo Mini—they are small enough to take with
me, but they are powerful enoug...
LET’S ADD THE DRIVE
Since it’s time for some more storage, let’s add a drive so Lightroom can see it.
MAKE A PARENT FOLDER...
CHOOSE THE SOURCE
In the Import Dialog, start at the top left and use the Source menu choose the
source you want to import...
CHOOSE WHAT TO DO WITH YOUR FILES
On the right side you’ll find two options for handling the files as they are imported.
Pay...
Don’t Import Suspected Duplicates: Unchecked This is a change from what I
told you to do in the Chapter on Importing from ...
Unless you are working with other
photographers in a network environment, the
first rule in creating a catalog is to develo...
G Grid mode in the Library module
E Loupe mode enlarges the most selected photo in the Grid mode
N Survey mode puts only s...
Unless you are working with other
photographers in a network environment, the
first rule in creating a catalog is to develo...
FILE NAMING: THE VALUE OF SERIAL
NUMBERS
Adding all of this information might produce a file name like this one:
2015-09-27...
What’s missing is a way to know right away what is missing. 

That’s where the serial number comes in. Let’s look at the
d...
Add the same serial number and a dash to the front of the existing file name. I
keep a spreadsheet with my projects listed ...
Unless you are working with other
photographers in a network environment, the
first rule in creating a catalog is to develo...
Unhappy with the filename, I asked several photographers what naming
convention they used and why. I received lots of advic...
EXPORTING IMAGES
Now that I have my naming structure set, I keep the same structure when I export
my images. The only diff...
I’m a bit of a nut, and I while I may seem pretty
carefree and easy going about many things, I
actually have a few systems...
I’ve just found that things work best when i always do things the same way. Join
me for a shoot and you’ll definitely hear ...
Export To: Specific folder, Choose folder later, or Same folder as original folder. I
usually use the first option and the l...
I run into this when I’ve exported one file, then gone on to another picture and
entered the Export Dialog and then just hi...
FILE NAMING
I usually check the box to Rename To: and then I select Custom Name-Sequence.
In the Custom Text field I enter ...
FILE SETTINGS
Image Format: I usually choose JPEG because I’m usually generating a new file
to be shared with a client as a...
IMAGE RESIZING
Resize to Fit: I often use this to resize images for sharing online, or for my clients
to share images onli...
If you see a big difference, then you’re probably more skilled at sharpening than I
am, and have probably already sharpene...
theft. Most people, though, are not trying to rip you off, and if they share a
photograph online, what better way to let p...
Make a watermark in Photoshop by creating a graphic and placing it on a
transparent background, then saving it a .png file....
GET ORGANIZEDC H A P T E R 2
Metadata is a set of data that describes and
gives information about other data. In
photography, metadata contains valuabl...
THE VALUE OF METADATA
This is great, however, the real power of metadata is when data and information is
entered into the ...
Metadata is a set of standardized information
about a photo, such as the author’s name,
resolution, color space, copyright...
COPYRIGHT METADATA
You've already learned that s a good idea to add copyright information to your
images. This allows anyo...
Step Three: When you are done, click Create.
This preset will now show in the Apply During Import dialog as the default, a...
Keywords describe the contents of a photo. A
successful keyword workflow will help identify,
search for, and quickly find ph...
KEYWORDING PANEL
There are a few different methods of applying keywords to an image. Each
method requires that you select ...
CREATE KEYWORD SHORTCUTS
Keyword shortcuts let you quickly apply one or more keywords to multiple photos.
After you define ...
APPLY KEYWORDS USING SHORTCUTS
Step One: To apply the keyword shortcut, select one or more photos in the
Gridview .
Step T...
Giving our images descriptive filenames helps
keep everything organized both inside and
outside of Lightroom. The best time...
On the right side of Lightroom’s import window, toggle open the File Renaming
panel. Put a check where it says Rename File...
These images need to be kept in sequential order, so under numbering choose
the Sequence # dropdown and make sure it has 4...
Your images are already in Lightroom, and
you’ve never given them a descriptive name.
Lightroom has a built-in Rename Phot...
First select the images you’d like to rename. A quick way to select all images is
using the keyboard shortcut Command or C...
Remember that we’re building a template right now, so we don’t want to add the
actual text in here. On the File Renaming p...
I like to add a reverse date (2015-03-26 or 20150326) and then the name of my
photo shoot. Adding a hyphen or underscore h...
I love collections! It’s hard to believe there was a
time when I didn’t use them at all. Nowadays, I
can’t even imagine my...
WHAT’S A COLLECTION?
Collections are like a little catalog of certain pictures, usually related by topic. You
can collect ...
which is why it may be a good idea to make new virtual copies if I’m going to be
making changes to the pictures but still ...
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Get Organized in Lightroom
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Get Organized in Lightroom

38,625 views

Published on

While Adobe Photoshop Lightroom is a great tool to develop your photos, it also serves another important purpose… keeping your images organized. But how you go about this process is pretty complex. Join five photographers as they share their ideas on how to keep an organized photo library. To get started, take an in-depth look at the Lightroom library. Next, you’ll gain important insight to get organized. For photographers on the go, you’ll learn strategies for working with Lightroom while mobile. To get your library to a manageable size, you’ll explore important strategies on making selects. Finally, learn the secrets of top gurus to solve problems when your library grows and becomes difficult to manage. This in-depth guide is from the experts at Photofocus.com.

Published in: Art & Photos

Get Organized in Lightroom

  1. 1. THELIBRARY CHAPTER1
  2. 2. Lightroom is a powerful manager of digital photography. The heart of it is the Library Module. Work in the rest of the modules begins by choosing a photograph or a group of them in the Library. S E C T I O N 1 THE LIBRARY MODULE K E V I N A M E S
  3. 3. DATABASE Lightroom is at its core a database. It stores all of the information about a photograph. From the camera settings at the time of exposure, to keywords, copyright and creator info through all of the changes made in the Develop module, face recognition and even GPS coordinates; Lightroom maintains and retrieves these data on demand. It’s very important to know that Lightroom is only a database. It references photographs stored on hard drives. It does not store photographs. There are NO photographs in Lightroom… only information about them. Importing photographs into Lightroom stores information about them. It does not store the photographs themselves. ! A Sad Story—There are NO PHOTOGRAPHS in Lightroom! When the first version of Lightroom was introduced, a photographer imported all of his work and personal photography into it. He was delighted to see how small the Lightroom catalog was. He immediately deleted all of his photographs to free up space on his (at the time) very expensive and almost full 1.5 terabyte RAID holding 4-500 gigabyte drives. His work was gone. Forever. The moral of the story is that Lightroom only references the photographs on a hard drive. It stores information, metadata about the photographs, not the photographs themselves. I’ll say it again: THERE ARE NO PHOTOGRAPHS IN LIGHTROOM. There. I’ve said it three times. If this sounds redundant, it is because it’s very important. Believe it. WHAT HAPPENS IN THE LIBRARY MODULE? The Library module is the place where photographs are imported, sorted, ranked, rated, flagged, selected, collected, adjusted and exported. There are chapters in this eBook covering each of the myriads of happenings in the Library module. SORTING Choosing the “hero” photograph from a take is one of the most important and arguable challenging jobs a photographer performs in the Library module. Ranking, rating, flagging and selecting are covered in depth in the Making Selects section. 3 S E C T I O N 1 | T H E L I B R A R Y M O D U L E
  4. 4. THE TOUR The Library module screen is divided into two sidebars—one on the right and one on the left, an Image Display area, Filmstrip and a Toolbar. The major parts of the Library Module are: A: Left Sidebar’s panels for working with source photographs B: Right Sidebar’s panels for adjusting images; working with metadata & keywords C: Image Display Area set to Grid view. D: Filmstrip E: Toolbar F: Identity Plate G: Library Filter Bar H: Module Picker 4 S E C T I O N 1 | T H E L I B R A R Y M O D U L E
  5. 5. LEFT SIDEBAR PANELS Navigator—shows the current selected photograph. Mouse over a folder in the Folders panel to display the first photo in it. Catalog—a bird’s eye view of the contents of Lightroom • All Photographs shows the count of imported photos • All Synced Photographs is a count of photos synced using Lightroom Mobile • Quick Collection shows the number of photos in the Quick Collections • Previous Import displays the number of photos last brought into Lightroom. • Previous Export as Catalog shows the number of photos copied from Lightroom to a new or different catalog. • Already in Catalog shows photos that are in from a previous import Folders—shows the mounted volumes on the computer and the folders of photographs that have been imported. Click the + sign for options of what is shown. Choose “Add Folder” to create a new or to choose a folder to import. Collections—virtual groups of photographs. The + sign adds a Collection Set, a new Collection or a programmable “Smart Collection” Highlight a collection then click the minus (-) sign to remove it. Publish Services— exporting presets and / or plug-ins to send photographs to a set location on a hard drive or to upload to social media like Facebook or Flickr. End Marks—put your logo or other flourish in the space at the bottom of each sidebar. Choose Lightroom (Mac) or Edit (Windows) > Preferences. Click the Interface tab. Choose End Marks then Go to Panel End Marks Folder. Put your end mark in the folder. Go back to Lightroom’s Preferences > Interface > End Marks then select your mark. It displays like mine. 5 S E C T I O N 1 | T H E L I B R A R Y M O D U L E
  6. 6. RIGHT SIDEBAR PANELS The right sidebar is all about adding info to photographs in the database. 
 It begins with the Histogram graphic showing the distribution of pixels by brightness. Below that is the exposure info: ISO, Focal Length, Aperture and Shutter Speed. Underneath this is the status of the photo and if it has a Smart Preview. Select all of the photos in the Grid view to see a count of Originals without Smart Previews and Originals + Smart Previews. If the external drive holding the original photographs is disconnected, the number of thumbnails with Smart Previews and the number missing them are displayed. 
 Next is the Quick Develop panel. This is where initial tweaks to photographs are made before refining them in the Develop module. This is a great place for beginners. The Auto Tone button also is a quick fix. The single arrow buttons increase / decrease Exposure by a third of a stop per click or .33 plus (right arrow) or minus (left arrow.) All of the other settings increment by 5 plus or minus. The double arrows in Exposure are for one stop increases or decreases. The other choices get a 20 point plus or minus by click their respective double arrow button. The Develop module offers much more finesse as well as many more options. Quick Develop is offers a fast look at the Basic tab adjustments without sliders. 6 S E C T I O N 1 | T H E L I B R A R Y M O D U L E
  7. 7. There two panels that support keywords: Keywording and Keyword List. Keywording is the entry point. Add keywords in the entry window. Separate multiple keywords with a comma. If a keyword already exists in the Keyword list, it will appear as a highlighted suggestion. Accept it by pressing Return. The Keyword List is exactly that, a list of all of the keywords that have been entered in the Lightroom catalog. Of course, the Adobe engineers have made it super useful. Once a keyword is entered in the Keywording panel or during import it is listed in the Keyword List panel. It displays the number of photos carrying a given keyword. Images with multiple keywords have them highlighted in the Keyword List. Click the arrow to the far right of a highlighted or checkmarked keyword to show all of the photographs with that keyword. Super useful for finding specific photos quickly. 7 S E C T I O N 1 | T H E L I B R A R Y M O D U L E
  8. 8. LIBRARY MODULE MODES There are five modes in the Library module: Grid (G), Enlarge (E), Compare (C), Survey (N) and People (O). They are accessed with their keyboard shortcuts, in the Toolbar or in Lightroom’s Library menu. The Grid is the thumbnail view shown above. Enlargement fills the content with the selected photo. Click a second time in this view to either fill, 1:1 (view actual pixels) or enlarge the image to a previously chosen size. The engineering team understands how important it is to go for the extra that makes Lightroom special. Like the amplifiers in Spinal Tap, this is where Lightroom “goes to eleven.” These settings are found above the preview in the Navigator. Compare is the side-by-side view. Select what you think is the “hero” shot. Use the arrow keys in this view to compare new photos to your select. When or if you find a better choice, it can be promoted from candidate to select becoming the new “hero.” Survey allows several photos to be seen in a larger view at the same time. Photos not making the cut can be removed. The remaining pictures enlarge to fill the space available. 8 S E C T I O N 1 | T H E L I B R A R Y M O D U L E
  9. 9. Lightroom calls its database a catalog. There is huge debate about the best way to organize photographs. The debate is simply one catalog or many. In my mind there is no debate at all to this one. A single catalog that uses all of Lightroom’s many methods of categorizing photographs makes the most sense. Here comes the hedge on that pedantic proclamation—most of the time. I’ll swing back to that one in a minute. S E C T I O N 2 ONE CATALOG K E V I N A M E S
  10. 10. Think about your catalog of photographs as if it were your calendar. Answer this question: How many calendars do you have? One. Right? Multiple calendars mean missed appointments, to dos or (gasp) anniversaries. When all of the things you have to do or remember are in one place, your single calendar; nothing gets missed or forgotten. Your photographs are the same. If you maintain individual catalogs, something is going to get overlooked or forgotten. Calendars, catalogs and the Highlander have this saying in common: “There can be only one…” THE “EXCEPTION” IS TEMPORARY The exception to the “there can be only one” rule is a temporary catalog made on a trip or a location shoot where carrying the “one” catalog isn’t practical. The temporary catalog has all of the advantages of Lightroom in a much smaller space. As catalogs grow, so does their size. Especially when the 1:1 previews and Smart Previews are counted. My Lightroom catalog has just north of 450,000 photos. Counting the previews it’s huge—470 gigabytes. A new catalog has none of the overhead initially. MAKE A TEMPORARY CATALOG I’ll illustrate this using a temp catalog I made during a trip to three countries in Europe. Here, step-by-step is how I set it up. Step One: Connect your traveling hard drive to your computer. Mine is a Drobo Mini that provides serious protection against the failure of any of its four drives. Step Two: Launch Lightroom. Choose File > New Catalog… Step Three: Name the catalog using a description of the project. I start my catalog names with the initials LR for Lightroom and the version number. In this case it’s from the Creative Cloud so the name starts with LRCC. 10 S E C T I O N 2 | O N E C A T A L O G
  11. 11. Lightroom creates a folder with the Lightroom catalog with the extension .lrcat It also creates the preview data file. Its extension is .lrdata. Step Four: Open Lightroom’s preferences by choosing (Mac) Lightroom > Preferences or (Win) Edit > Preferences. Click the Presets tab, then check the box next to Store presets with this catalog, The presets folder contains all of the templates and presets in Lightroom’s modules. This folder appears in the LRCC folder created in step three. Launch Lightroom by opening its folder then double clicking on the LRCC (Your Project Description).lrcat. BACKING UP A location project that is managed by a temporary catalog follows the same best practices of backing up photographs that is used in the studio—always maintain three copies. If you have enough memory cards, that can be one of them. If not, get a couple portable, bus powered USB drives from Western Digital and Seagate are small, light weight and inexpensive. Use them to make exact copies of your primary hard drive. I use a Drobo Mini for this job. Since Lightroom only references the photographs in the catalog, the backups are not affected by changes unless of course the photographer chooses Edit In… Photoshop instead of Open as Smart Object in Photoshop. The former places a copy in the same folder as the original. The latter has to be saved using File > Save as…. 11 S E C T I O N 2 | O N E C A T A L O G
  12. 12. IMPORT A CATALOG After the project like my European adventure is complete, I bring my temporary catalog and its accompanying RAW files back to the studio. With my main Lightroom catalog open, I choose File > Import from Another Catalog…. When the dialog opens I navigate to the Drobo Mini, my primary traveling drive and choose the LRCC Kevin in Europe.lrcat. Lightroom creates a temporary catalog then offers to either leave the photographs on the location drive (bad idea) or copy them to the main photo archive. That’s my choice. Depending on the number of photos and the size of the location catalog, the import can take a significant amount of time. I usually leave this until the last thing of the day so Lightroom can work on it overnight. 12 S E C T I O N 2 | O N E C A T A L O G
  13. 13. MANY CATALOG S Should I have a single Lightroom catalog or should I have many?  That was the the first question I asked back in July 2006 when I received a beta version of Lightroom. Like many, I was sailing in uncharted waters. S E C T I O N 3 MANY CATALOGS K E V I N A M E SV A N E L L I
  14. 14. At first, someone started a rumor and said Lightroom can handle a maximum of 15 thousand images before performance was affected.  Everyone started to repeat that rumor. This caused many, including myself, to split my images into several Lightroom catalogs. Before we begin, let me take a step back for a moment and explain what a catalog is. WHAT’S A LIGHTROOM CATALOG? Adobe describes a Lightroom catalog as a database that stores a record for each of your photos that contains three key pieces of information about each photo: • A reference to where the photo is on your system • Instructions for how you want to process the photo • Metadata, such as ratings and keywords that you apply to photos to help you find or organize them. This means when you import photos into Lightroom, you create a link between the photo itself and the record of the photo in the catalog. Then, any work you perform on the photo — such as adding keywords or an edit — is stored in the photo’s record in the catalog as additional metadata. Lightroom never changes the actual photos captured by your camera. In this way, editing in Lightroom is nondestructive. You can always return to the original, unedited photo. 14 S E C T I O N 3S E C T I O N 3 | M A N Y C A T A L O G S
  15. 15. A CASE FOR MULTIPLE CATALOGS Being a generalist photographer, my photography spanned a wide range. One week I would photograph a sporting event, the following week a child’s portraits. One catalog was sufficient until I started working with models. My modeling assignments ranged from simple head shots to building their portfolios. Some of these images were not appropriate for all to see. By creating a separate catalog, I could keep these images private. To ensure the Main catalog opened when starting Lightroom, I changed the default preference, “Load most recent catalog” to “Prompt me when starting Lightroom” found by clicking on Preference under the Edit menu then click the General tab. This gave me the option to open the correct catalog and to avoid embarrassment. FLAWS WITH MULTIPLE CATALOGS As Lightroom developed, flaws with multiple catalogs grew, for example… • When I searched for an image, I would have to open each catalog, Lightroom can’t span a search across multiple catalogs. • Having extra catalogs mean extra catalogs to backup, just one more task to worry about. • Sometimes I would become confused and import images into the wrong catalog. • When a major update rolls out, all catalogs have to be updated. • Synchronizing Publish services such as Facebook and Smugmug Hierarchy become complicated. For my work flow, this flaw sealed my decision to switch to a single catalog.
 15 S E C T I O N 3S E C T I O N 3 | M A N Y C A T A L O G S
  16. 16. SINGLE CATALOG SOLUTION Since I switched to a single catalog solution my Lightoom experience has become very simple. After a photo shoot, I fire up Lightroom, create a new folder and import my images. Create a collection set of my favorite edited images then upload them to a publishing service such as SmugMug and Facebook. To solve my modeling dilemma, I created two new folder, Adult Models and Children Models. I created sub folders with the names of the models under the appropriate folder. Now when I browse for a model in front of a client, age appropriate images are hidden. Since switching to a single catalog solution, my workflow is fast and simple. 16 S E C T I O N 3S E C T I O N 3 | M A N Y C A T A L O G S
  17. 17. It’s important to remember that Lightroom doesn’t have your photographs in it.Your photographs reside on your hard drive, and Lightroom simply references them. When I was a kid I went to the library in my neighborhood and looked in the card catalog for a book I wanted.The card in the catalog had information about the book, and it told me where to find the book.The book wasn’t in the catalog, it was on the shelf. This is like Lightroom. Lightroom is just a catalog of your pictures.The pictures are actually on the hard drive (the shelf). I recommend that you use Lightroom to manage your pictures all the time.The thing is, if you go into the neighborhood library and move a book from one shelf to another, the catalog isn’t accurate anymore, and Lightroom is the same way. If you move a picture file outside of Lightroom, then Lightroom doesn’t know where it is to reference it any longer. S E C T I O N 4 IMPORTING FROM A MEMORY CARD L E V I S I M
  18. 18. Lightroom is so powerful for organizing and finishing your photographs, and the first step is to import photographs into Lightroom. Personally, I usually need to import pictures from a memory card I used in a recent shoot, so I’ll show you how to do that and walk you through the whole import dialogue. SET THE PREFERENCES The first thing to do is make sure a couple of preferences are set that will make importing a little simpler. Go to the Lightroom Menu and choose Preferences (Edit>Preferences). In the General tab, make sure the option is checked to Show import dialogue when memory card is detected. Also, check the box for Treat JPEG files next to raw files as separate photos. If you don’t check this second option, Lightroom will ignore the JPEG files your camera creates when you set it to record RAW+JPEG. OPEN THE IMPORT DIALOGUE Go to the File Menu and choose Import Photos and Video, or use the keyboard shortcut Cmd+SHIFT+I (Ctrl+SHIFT+I). I use this shortcut all the time. This is what the Import Dialogue looks like, but this is a condensed view, and I feel the expanded view will serve you better. Click the arrow in the bottom left corner to see more options. 18 S E C T I O N 4 | I M P O R T I N G F R O M A M E M O R Y C A R D
  19. 19. CHOOSE THE IMPORT SOURCE Basically, you start on the left, and work to the right. At the top left is says Select a source, and the memory card you inserted will probably be the first tab on the left under the title Devices. If it’s not already selected, click on the name of your memory card; it’s usually named for the camera model you used (for some reason, my Lumix GX7 always reads as No Name). You’ll see all the pictures you made on that card in a grid in the center. CHOOSE WHAT TO DO WITH YOUR PICTURES In the center section you decide what to do with your pictures. At the top there are four options: Copy as DNG, Copy, Move, Add, and the one selected has a brief description of what it does immediately underneath. Lightroom recognizes that your memory card is not a hard drive for longterm storage, so Move and Add not available (see the chapter on Adding and External Drive). Here’s what the other options do. 19 S E C T I O N 4 | I M P O R T I N G F R O M A M E M O R Y C A R D
  20. 20. Copy as DNG: New for Lr CC: This makes a new copy of the images from your card on your computer or hard drive and converts RAW files to the Adobe DNG file format. One advantage of this method is that DNG files are significantly smaller than the camera’s RAW format. I personally use this option every time. Only RAW files are affected; JPEG’s will still be JPEG’s. There’s a terrific new feature in Lightroom CC that makes this process much faster. Previously, Lightroom converted the files to DNG as they were imported, and it was much slower than simply copying the files form the card. Now, Lightroom copies the files from the card to the hard drive, then when that is complete it converts the files to DNG. This is much faster and since you can only import from one source at a time, it allows you start another import sequence sooner. While the files are converting to DNG you can still begin working with them as normal in Lightroom. Copy: This option simply copies the files from the card to the hard drive. The Copy and Copy as DNG options are the best because the files remain on your card and a new version is now on the hard drive so you’ve got a solid backup until you format the card in your camera. Some people have voiced concerns that they don’t trust Lightroom to copy all the files from the card, and so they first copy the files to the hard drive using Finder or Explorer, then use the Add option to include them in the Lightroom catalog. However, in six years of importing files nearly everyday, Lightroom has never lost or missed a single one of my files using the import dialogue. Save your paranoia for backing up your files and trust Lightroom to import them. CHOOSE WHICH PICTURES TO IMPORT Now that we’ve chosen to Copy as DNG, the center section can be used to selectively import photographs. Most of the time, I’m more interested in getting to work on my pictures than I am in saving hard drive space, so I just import all the images. However, you can choose to leave some of the pictures out of the import. Each thumbnail image has a checkmark in the top left corner. If it’s checked, it’ll be included. Sometimes I’ll quickly breeze through and uncheck images that are obviously junk—too dark, out of focus, pictures of the sidewalk—so that I don’t have to bother with deleting them later. You can click on the check box, or use SPACEBAR to toggle the check box To see which picture is which more clearly, use the Thumbnails slider in the bottom right corner to adjust the size of the preview. You can also double click on an image or press the E key to go to the Loupe view and see one image at a time. Press the G key to return to the Grid view, or use the Grid view icon in the bottom left corner. E and G are two shortcuts I use all the time in Lightroom. 20 S E C T I O N 4 | I M P O R T I N G F R O M A M E M O R Y C A R D
  21. 21. While in the Loupe view you can zoom in to check sharpness. Just use the slider in the bottom right corner.
 CHOOSE WHERE TO STORE YOUR PICTURES You’ve selected which pictures to include from the card, so now on the right side of the dialogue you get to choose what happens as they import and where they will reside on your hard drive. I’d like you to know what each setting here is for…but I don’t want to bore you. I’ve written my usual setting right up front in bold text, so if you’d like you can just set it and move on to the next setting and get started importing. 21 S E C T I O N 4 | I M P O R T I N G F R O M A M E M O R Y C A R D Pro Tip: Right click in the dark gray area next to any of the tab headings and choose Solo Mode. This makes it so that only one tab will show it’s options at a time. It may not sound like a big deal, but this makes it easier to find the right options and reduces frustration. I choose Solo Mode for all my tool pallets in Lightroom, and I recommend that you do, too.
  22. 22. FILE HANDLING Build Previews: Standard After the pictures import, Lightroom will create a preview of the file on the hard drive and this is what you’ll see on the screen. You’ve got four options, and these are simply related to the size of the picture you see, and they’re in order from smallest to largest. The important thing about each option is that it affects the speed at which things get done. Choosing the Minimal preview makes the import process a little bit faster, but it makes viewing and developing the picture slower because when you view the picture in Loupe view or in the Develop Module Lightroom will have to generate a bigger preview you can view at that size, which will take a few seconds. It’s only a few seconds, but it really slows down the process, especially when there are hundreds of pictures to review. Alternatively, you could opt for 1:1 which is a full size, 100% preview that will appear crisp and ready to view as soon as you click to zoom, but this takes up a lot of space on the drive, and takes more time up front to generate. I rarely need to have 100% previews for every picture. Standard is a good compromise because it shows me a good preview immediately in the Loupe, but doesn’t take up too much space and the previews are ready quickly after the import is finished. Build Smart Previews: Unchecked Smart Previews allow you to make Develop Module edits to images stored on a hard drive that are not connected to the computer. This is really handy, and I use it often, but the previews will take up a lot of space on your hard drive, so I recommend only generating them when you’re ready to use them. See the Chapter on Smart Previews 22 S E C T I O N 4 | I M P O R T I N G F R O M A M E M O R Y C A R D
  23. 23. Don’t Import Suspected Duplicates: Checked This is really good. It simply allows Lightroom to recognize pictures that you’ve already imported and stops you from importing them again. There are two times I use this. First, if I neglected to format my memory card in my camera after the last import, I now have pictures on the card that I just made, as well as pictures I’ve already imported, and Lightroom will now only import the new ones. Second, I may, for keywording and file naming purposes, sometimes choose to import pictures from one card into two different folders. Unfortunately, that requires two import sessions. So after I’ve imported the first batch, those pictures won’t be available for import when I initiate the second import session. Pictures that are already in your catalog appear grayed out and you can’t click on them in the grid view. Make a Second Copy To: Unchecked This simply duplicates the files and saves them in another location of your choosing. The idea here is that there is instantly a backup version of your pictures. I leave this unchecked because I use a Drobo for my destination drive, and it automatically makes a backup of the files and is so simple to manage. If I check this option and backup to another drive, that drive doesn’t have all the changes I make to images applied, so if my primary drive fails and I have to use the backup it’s a really tedious and possibly costly process to get me back to the way things were before the failure. Using the Drobo, when a drive fails, I just remove that drive and put a new one in, and nothing is lost on the way and my catalog isn’t fouled up and I’m really not interrupted in anyway. Add to Collection: Unchecked I’ve never used this option, but maybe after you read the chapter on Collections you’ll find a use for it. 23 S E C T I O N 4 | I M P O R T I N G F R O M A M E M O R Y C A R D You can control how big your Standard Previews are and how much space they take up in the Catalog Settings (Lightroom>Catalog Settings, Edit>Catalog Settings). You can experiment with a few settings and see where your tolerance for performance lies.
  24. 24. FILE RENAMING Rename Files: Checked I like to rename my files as I import them. If you’ve read Kevin’s chapter about Lightroom Organization, then you may want to follow his advice on naming. Another way to do it is to name files by the date, or the name of the place or people you photographed. I’ve taken to adding my own name as a precursor to the client name for one reason. In my work, I’m often delivering files to my clients which they use for marketing and advertising, which means it’s inappropriate to have my own name signed on the image in a watermark or signature. Using my name in the filename may at least ensure that the next person hired at the company to look for a photographer will have access to my name pretty easily.
 Template I usually use the Custom Name-Sequence template in the drop down box. Click Edit at the bottom of the list, though, and you’ll find a whole lot more options for customizing the name of your files. 24 S E C T I O N 4 | I M P O R T I N G F R O M A M E M O R Y C A R D
  25. 25. Start Number: 1…or not I usually start at number 1, but if I’m importing the second card full from a shoot, then I might choose to start at the number after the last image on the previous card. If you change this, remember to change it back to 1 next time you import; the Import dialogue remembers your previous settings and uses them again until changed. Extensions: Leave as-is I’ve never bothered with this, but you’ve got options to change the .jpg or .NEF or .CR2 or whatever file type your camera makes to uppercase, lowercase, or leave it as-is. Sample: I think it’s nice that they show a live preview of what the filename will look like. APPLY DURING IMPORT Develop Settings: My personal preset Any preset that I’ve made in the Develop Module can be applied during the import process. For instance, when shooting Nikons, I usually set the in-camera Picture Style to Neutral. But, for RAW images, Lightroom’s default setting is to apply the Adobe Standard profile, which I don’t care for. In the Camera Calibration tab you can change this profile to the ones that your camera has so that the image will look in Lightroom the same as it looks on the back of the camera. Since I do this every time, I saved the setting as a preset and can now select to apply that preset during import. This works for most settings in the Develop Module (however, because it slows performance significantly, I recommend not applying the Lens Correction settings during import; apply it later to you favorite images). You’ll see here that I’m applying my preset made especially for my GH4. 25 S E C T I O N 4 | I M P O R T I N G F R O M A M E M O R Y C A R D
  26. 26. Metadata: My Personal Preset This is really cool. Metadata is non-visual information in your picture file. I said I use the filename to put my name in the picture, but metadata is much better way to do it. You can include all kinds of information about yourself, your copyright information, your contact information, etc. Click the drop down menu and choose Edit Presets… then just fill in the blanks. Your camera already puts information about exposure, camera settings, lens info, and even some copyright info, but it’s a good idea to add more complete information during import so that it’s done no matter where your pictures end up going. There is a lot of information available here; you can add the same fields to any images within the Library Module once the import is done. You can even add them during export, as may be more appropriate. Keywords: Definitely During import you can add keywords to all the photographs on your card, and you may want to do that generally here. Fortunately, you can do it more specifically in the Library Module, placing keywords on only the relevant images. See the chapter on Keywords to have your mind blown about how useful these are. 26 S E C T I O N 4 | I M P O R T I N G F R O M A M E M O R Y C A R D
  27. 27. DESTINATION Super Simple method: Arrow at the top The simplest way to tell Lightroom where you want your pictures to go is to click the black circle with an arrow in it and navigate to the folder you want or make a new folder in the location you want. This arrow has a drop down menu that includes your recent import destinations. I often select Other Destination and navigate manually. Organize: Into one folder Since Lightroom remembers your last settings, I usually now use the Destination tab to choose where my photos will go. Again, Kevin Ames has some great ideas for organization, and I’m working to switch my system. But to date, this is how I have done my organization. I have a master folder of Pictures, then subfolders for each year, then subfolders for events/shoots. That’s pretty much it because I’ll use collections instead of further subfolders (See Chapter on Collections) . So, I simply navigate on my drive to where I want the pictures to reside; I often use the Into Subfolder check box to add the destination under the year I’m working in. Now, just press Import. Now you’ll be taken to the Library Module, and you’ll see a progress bar in the top left corner of the window. This bar has an X right at the end so you can cancel the process if you realize you did something unintended. Otherwise, your pictures will now materialize before your eyes. 27 S E C T I O N 4 | I M P O R T I N G F R O M A M E M O R Y C A R D
  28. 28. A QUICK SANITY SAVER LIBRARY:CATALOG TAB: PREVIOUS IMPORT A quick note about the view you see as your pictures import. You are seeing them in a special collection called Previous Import which resides in the Catalog tab of the Library Module. It’s distinct from the folder they reside in because any pictures you add, like exporting one of these new pictures as a jpeg file, will not show up on this set of images…which really threw me for a loop when I first used Lightroom. This Catalog tab is really handy. There have been times I’ve assigned the wrong folder during import (or export) and when I try to find them in the Folders tab, it’s really tempting to freak out because they are lost. Take a breath, go the Catalog tab and look for them in the Previous Import set. If you’ve already imported some others, then click on All Photographs. The pictures you see will be in order by date, so you can pretty quickly find the pictures your looking for. More about searching for pictures in the chapter on Metadata. 28 S E C T I O N 4 | I M P O R T I N G F R O M A M E M O R Y C A R D
  29. 29. When making photographs in the studio I shoot tethered into an external drive plugged into an older MacPro on a rolling AnthroCart. On location, tethered shooting is into an external hard drive connected to a MacBookPro. In both cases there is a folder holding the shots. S E C T I O N 5 IMPORTING FROM A FOLDER K E V I N A M E S
  30. 30. IMPORTING FROM A FOLDER Chances are you have images already in a folder and organized. These are easy to import into Lightroom I copy the folder onto my primary Drobo 5D set up with dual disc redundancy. This means any two of the five drives in the Drobo can fail and my data is still safe. Once the folder is copied to the main drive, follow these steps… Step One: Enter the Library module. Click Import… or use the keyboard shortcut Command (PC: Control) + Shift + I. The condensed dialog box looks like this: The import process requires three decisions plus presets. Step Two: Select the source by clicking on the double headed arrow at the left of the dialog. When the source is a folder, Lightroom automatically picks Add as the “what to do.” In this case, there are no destination options. The folder is already where it needs to be so the “To” reads My Catalog. Step Three: Add the metadata preset. The develop preset is the last one used. Change it by expanding the condensed dialog by clicking the down arrow in the lower left hand corner. Finally click Import. 30 S E C T I O N 5 | I M P O R T I N G F R O M A F O L D E R
  31. 31. Tethered shooting is the digital equivalent of taking a Polaroid® in the days of film. Back then, Polaroids were used to check composition, lighting, exposure and focus; photography’s big four. On a job it was unthinkable not to “pull a ‘Roid.” S E C T I O N 6 TETHERED SHOOTING K E V I N A M E SK E V I N A M E S
  32. 32. Today, professional photographers shoot directly into a computer. The monitor performs all of the functions that the Polaroid did back in the days of film. Now every square inch of an image can be examined at full size or larger to check the big four and now color as well. Thanks to calibration of monitors, photography can finally be WYSIWYG… what you see is what you get. This can’t be achieved using the screen on the back of the camera. These monitors can be calibrated. Frankly they are just an indicator for those who believe that quality is the presence of an image. LIGHTROOM AND THE TETHERED CAMERA Most current Canon and Nikon along with a few Leica DSLR cameras can tether to Lightroom. Click here for a list of supported cameras. Note that as of this writing, Mac computers running El Capitan will not tether Lightroom with Nikon cameras. This is due to a problem with Nikon’s SDK (Software Development Kit) that has not been updated for El Capitan. It is Nikon’s problem to solve not Apple’s nor Adobe’s. Lightroom’s tethering allows the shutter to be released from the computer. However control of ISO, Shutter and Aperture settings are not supported. The tether HUD does show the model of the connected camera along with the current settings. SETTING UP TETHERING IN LIGHTROOM Begin by choosing File > Start Tethered Shooting… The dialog is a bit confusing. Here are the steps to get it right. Step One: Start with the third section. This is where the destination for the camera original files are stored. Click Choose… then navigate to the hard drive that stores your folders of RAW files. Step Two: Go to the first section, Session Name:. This creates a new folder in the destination folder. The reason the destination is in the third section is because once it’s set you probably won’t change it. Name the session. In this case it’s the 2889th project so it gets the prefix 2889-. The description is Model Testing. The folder that will appear in Lightroom is named 2889-Model Testing. 33 S E C T I O N 6S E C T I O N 6 | T E T H E R E D S H O O T I N G The monitor displays the current capture from the camera.
  33. 33. Step Three: Naming is next. I’ve created a preset that provides a field for custom text, in this case 2889. The Start Number is 1. Above the preset is a Sample of what the name of the first photo will look like. 2889-0001.DNG. DNG is the extension for the sample only. No matter what camera or format you shoot with it the Sample will always end in .DNG. Don’t let this bother you. Step Four: Add your metadata preset (Chapter 3 under Get Organized) and Keywords. Click OK. The Tethered Capture Window appears. It shows the camera that’s tethered to Lightroom, the destination folder, the exposure information and a drop down menu to choose a Develop preset. The big round button at the right is the shutter release. Click it or press the spacebar to make an exposure. If the Library module is active, the first photo will appear in the Grid view. 34 S E C T I O N 6 | T E T H E R E D S H O O T I N G
  34. 34. Once the first photo appears in Lightroom, tap E to enlarge it then look at it. While looking learn to actually “see” what’s there. Here’s a checklist for making certain photographs measure up. 1. Composition: Are the elements in the photograph arranged well? 2. Lighting: Are the important details in the photograph visible? 3. Exposure: Is detail visible in the highlights? How about in the shadows? 4. Focus: Is the subject of the photograph sharp? Once these questions are answered to your satisfaction, tap D to enter the Develop module. An enlarged version will appear as will each subsequent photograph you make. . Use the white balance tool (W) on a ColorChecker to neutralize any colorcast 35 S E C T I O N 6 | T E T H E R E D S H O O T I N G
  35. 35. I don’t erase my memory cards until I have at least 2 copies of my photos. One of the best time-savers is to let Lightroom back up your photos on import. S E C T I O N 7 BACKING UP ON IMPORT N I C K M I N O R E
  36. 36. Inside the import window, Lightroom makes it super-easy to create a second copy. It’s always best to make sure you’re backing up to a second hard drive, rather than another location on the same hard drive. This way, you’re okay if something was to happen to either drive. Look to the top right of the import window and choose the File Handling dropdown menu. 37 S E C T I O N 7 | B A C K I N G U P O N I M P O R T
  37. 37. The last option says “Make a Second Copy To:” with a dropdown arrow. Put a checkmark in the box and click the dropdown arrow. Choose where you’d like to save a backup of your files and continue preparing to import your files into Lightroom. That’s it... you’ve now got a backup being made at time of import. 38 S E C T I O N 7 | B A C K I N G U P O N I M P O R T
  38. 38. You can user folders, just like in a file cabinet or on your computer’s hard drive to keep your images organized. S E C T I O N 8 USING FOLDERS & SUBFOLDERS K E V I N A M E SK E V I N A M E S
  39. 39. Normally, I work without any subfolders in Lightroom. When it’s time to sort photographs I use Collections. Collections can have the same photo in several places at the same time. This can’t be done with subfolders since Lightroom doesn’t like duplicate images. Duplicates also take up a huge amount of space. There is s comprehensive discussion of Collections and how to use them in our next chapter. FOLDERS I assign a folder to each job or project. It gets a project name also know as a serial number and a brief description of its contents. More on this in the section called Using Serial Names later in this chapter. The camera original photographs RAW or (shudder) JPEGs go here for cataloging in Lightroom. Folders are where the RAW files from each project are stored on a hard drive or in my case on a Drobo. SUBFOLDERS The only time I use subfolders is when a project is so large that it covers several months or years. Subfolders get the four digit project number followed by the shoot date then a brief description. This structure manages shoots that contain many thousands of photographs made over time. This is particularly useful when shooting a lot of time-lapse sequences. Each one gets a subfolder. Each subfolder is a separate billing item on the invoice the customer receives. 40 S E C T I O N 8S E C T I O N 8 | U S I N G F O L D E R S & S U B F O L D E R S
  40. 40. Unless you are working with other photographers in a network environment, the first rule in creating a catalog is to develop a folder structure that makes sense to you. If you are in a network environment with other photographers this may get a little complicated causing you to compromise. Unless you are working with other photographers in a network environment, the first rule in creating a catalog is to develop a folder structure that makes sense to you. If you are in a network environment with other photographers this 
 may get a little complicated causing you to compromise. A DIFFERENT TAKE ON FOLDER STRUCTURE V A N E L L I S E C T I O N 9
  41. 41. I’ve found it best to write a brief sentence that describes your type of photography and what, where, or who you photograph. Review your sentence and look for a common denominator. Examples • I’m a Portrait photographer whose clients include corporate professionals, celebrities, as well as families. • I’m a Nature photographer who travels to different locations photographing all types of birds. • I’m an independent Sports photographer specializing in portraits, team portraits and games for all levels of sports.
 PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHER Our portrait photographer photographs people, people associated with a corporation and people associated with a family. A person has a first and last name, corporations have a name as does a family. The common denominator is name. Create a subfolder inside the main folder — I named my main folder Photography —  and name the subfolder the client’s name. Create a subfolder inside the client’s folder and name it the year, month and day of the shoot followed by a brief description. E:PhotographyPotter Family20130411 Liam 4th Birthday In the event you photograph this person, corporation or family several times in the course of a few years, you have each shoot organize. DEALING WITH A CONFLICT Pruitt Real Estate hired you to photograph 75 of their employees. One of their employees is Chloe Garvin, a client of yours you have photographed before. Since Pruitt Real Estate paid for the shoot, Chloe’s portrait is in the Pruitt Real Estate folder. If she leaves the company, the image stays with the company, not her Louis Davis personally hired you to take his corporate portrait. Following our file structure, you placed the image in a folder named Louis Davis with a sub folder named year, month and day followed by a descriptions of the shoot; Louis corporate portrait. E:PhotographyLouis Davis20140101 Louis Corporate Portrait All is great, in fact it's so great he hired you to take a portrait of his family. After the shoot you create a subfolder with the year, month and day followed by a description; family portrait inside the Louis Davis folder. E:PhotographyLouis Davis20140307 Family Portrait 42 S E C T I O N 9S E C T I O N 9 | A D I F F E R E N T T A K E O N F O L D E R S T R U C T U R E
  42. 42. SPORTS PHOTOGRAPHER Our Sports photographer photographs a wide range of sports and sport teams. The common denominator is the name of the sport and the name of the team. Sounds simple, however our photographer photographs different levels; Club, High School, College and Professional teams.The common denominator is level. To keep our folder structure organized, the first folder is Sports followed by a subfolder of the level of sport, High School Sports, followed by a subfolder of the name of the sport, Lacrosse. Inside the Lacrosse subfolder is the Name of the Team’s subfolder. The final subfolder is the year, month and day of the shoot with a brief description. This structure keeps multiple sports and multiple levels organized. E:PhotographySportsHigh School SportsLacrosseMelbourne High School DEALING WITH A CONFLICT Along with sport portraits, our photographer also photographs games. We need to create a Games subfolder under the name of the sport. The final subfolder is the year, month and day of the game followed by the names of the team. E:PhotographySportsProfessionalLacrosseGames 20140909_FloridaLaunch_vs_BostonCanons 43 S E C T I O N 9S E C T I O N 9 | A D I F F E R E N T T A K E O N F O L D E R S T R U C T U R E
  43. 43. NATURE PHOTOGRAPHER Our Nature photographer photographs all types birds. The common denominator is name. However, our photographer travels the world photographing these birds in different locations, another common denominator. Our nature photographer has a few options. They can organize the folder structure starting with the name of the bird followed by the location or start with the location followed by a subfolder of the date and name of the bird. Adding the date enables the photographer to photograph the same bird at the same location but on a different date. E:PhotographyEgret201508006 Viera Wetlands E:PhotographyViera Wetlands20100512 Limkin The question for our nature photographer is which is more important, the location of the shoot or the type of bird they photographed. Their answer will determine which folder structure they use. DEALING WITH A CONFLICT If our nature photographer photographs several different types birds on the same day and location using one memory card, they can import all images into one folder then move the images into their proper folder. These examples serve as a foundation for organizing a catalog’s folder structure. Remember, for the structure to be effective, it must make sense to you. 44 S E C T I O N 9 | A D I F F E R E N T T A K E O N F O L D E R S T R U C T U R E
  44. 44. I like file trees. They just make sense. At a glance I can see that this image is inside this folder which is in this folder which on this drive. It’s clear and makes good sense. Since I have lots of drives with picture files on them, it’s also nice to see the drives stacked up on the side in Lightroom—it makes it easy to see where I’m working. Let me quickly show you how to add hard drives to the Lightroom catalog so you can get organized, too. S E C T I O N 10 ADDING AN EXTERNAL DRIVE K E V I N A M E SL E V I S I M
  45. 45. WHAT’S A HARD DRIVE? You’ll find that you can’t add a hard drive that doesn’t have any pictures on it. If you’re planning to add files to it during export, you will see the drive available for to export images onto. THUMB DRIVES I’ve got three or four kinds of hard drives included in my Lightroom Catalog. I often use USB thumb drives for delivery to clients—the kind of little storage that plugs into the computer’s USB ports and doesn’t have any moving parts. PASSPORT DRIVES I also travel with a couple of passport sized USB hard drives that do spin, but are small enough to draw the power they need from the USB bus in the computer (no external power required). 46 S E C T I O N 10S E C T I O N 10 | A D D I N G A N E X T E R N A L D R I V E
  46. 46. DROBO MINI Next, I have hard drives like the Drobo Mini—they are small enough to take with me, but they are powerful enough that they need external power to spin the drives and read super fast. The Drobo Mini is a perfect solution for travel because it stores my files and backs them up so there are two copies so if one drive crashes, the pictures are still safe. DROBO 5D Lastly, I have drives that are not intended for travel. I’ve got a Drobo 5D on my desk that has several terabytes of storage in a RAID configuration so everything is protected from a hard drive crash. I also have another server set up in a similar manner with everything backed up on multiple drives in a RAID. Trouble is, my other server is both much larger physically than my Drobo and lacks the battery backup that the Drobo 5D has built in. So these two servers stay at my office and when I return from traveling my pictures end up getting moved to these. 47 S E C T I O N 10 | A D D I N G A N E X T E R N A L D R I V E
  47. 47. LET’S ADD THE DRIVE Since it’s time for some more storage, let’s add a drive so Lightroom can see it. MAKE A PARENT FOLDER Strange as it may seem, some people use computers for things other than making pictures. Weird, right? Well, that just means that an external hard drive may have something other than pictures on it. I recommend making a parent folder on the drive with all your pictures in it. Then put all the folders with your images in them inside this folder. I may get creative with my hard drive names, but this parent folder is simply called “Pictures” on each of my drives. I’m a simple guy in the end. OPEN IMPORT DIALOG Unlike when you plug an SD or CF card into the computer, Lightroom does not automatically launch the import dialog when you plug in an external hard drive. There are two ways to get to the Import Dialog, File>Import Photos and Video…, or use the keyboard shortcut Cmd+SHIFT+I (Ctrl+SHIFT+I). If you don’t see the expanded view of the Import Dialog, click the arrow in the bottom left corner to see more options. 48 S E C T I O N 10 | A D D I N G A N E X T E R N A L D R I V E Name your Hard Drives Personally, I like to name my hard drives. The C drive, or the E drive is pretty boring for me. Plus, when using external drives, I often have several from the same manufacturer, and it’s confusing trying to keep them separated. Instead of Drobo 1, Drobo 2, etc., I like to give them a name, and I like to use names of famous robots. You could use any name you like—maybe name them for your uncles, or you childhood pets, or your favorite teachers—trust me, asking a friend to hand you “that black hard drive” isn’t nearly as fun as saying, “Please pass R2- D2 over here.”
  48. 48. CHOOSE THE SOURCE In the Import Dialog, start at the top left and use the Source menu choose the source you want to import from—the Pictures folder on your hard drive. Make sure to check the box for Include Subfolders so that everything in that folder will be included in the import. CHOOSE “ADD” You’ll see that the only option in the center for what to do with your images is Add. Thank goodness for that! I could really foul things up if other options were available here. 49 S E C T I O N 10 | A D D I N G A N E X T E R N A L D R I V E Solo Your Tabs Right click in the dark gray area next to any of the tab headings and choose Solo Mode. This makes it so that only one tab will show it’s options at a time. It may not sound like a big deal, but this makes it easier to find the right options and reduces frustration. I choose Solo Mode for all my tool pallets in Lightroom, and I recommend that you do, too.
  49. 49. CHOOSE WHAT TO DO WITH YOUR FILES On the right side you’ll find two options for handling the files as they are imported. Pay attention here: these settings stay as they were last time you imported, which was probably from a memory card. When importing from a hard drive you need to change these settings significantly, or you’ll really foul up and pictures that were previously altered in Lightroom. FILE HANDLING Now yu need to decide what o do with your files on that new drive Build Previews: Standard After the pictures import, Lightroom will create a preview of the file on the hard drive and this is what you’ll see on the screen. You’ve got four options, and these are simply related to the size of the picture you see, and they’re in order from smallest to largest. The important thing about each option is that it affects the speed at which things get done. Choosing the Minimal preview makes the import process a little bit faster, but it makes viewing and developing the picture slower because when you view the picture in Loupe view or in the Develop Module Lightroom will have to generate a bigger preview you can view at that size, which will take a few seconds. It’s only a few seconds, but it really slows down the process, especially when there are hundreds of pictures to review. Alternatively, you could opt for 1:1 which is a full size, 100% preview that will appear crisp and ready to view as soon as you click to zoom, but this takes up a lot of space on the drive, and takes more time up front to generate. I rarely need to have 100% previews for every picture. Standard is a good compromise because it shows me a good preview immediately in the Loupe, but doesn’t take up too much space and the previews are ready quickly after the import is finished. Build Smart Previews: Unchecked Smart Previews allow you to make Develop Module edits to images stored on a hard drive that are not connected to the computer. This is really handy, and I use it often, but the previews will take up a lot of space on your hard drive, so I recommend only generating them when you’re ready to use them. See the Chapter on Smart Previews 50 S E C T I O N 10 | A D D I N G A N E X T E R N A L D R I V E
  50. 50. Don’t Import Suspected Duplicates: Unchecked This is a change from what I told you to do in the Chapter on Importing from a Memory Card. I’d uncheck this box here because we’re importing a file structure that you already had on your drive, and if you had files here that are also elsewhere, that’s ok. If we don’t include them in the import, they still exist on the drive, but will be orphaned from Lightroom. Include them in the import so that you can see them and manage them with all your other image files. APPLY DURING IMPORT Develop Settings, Metadata, Keywords: Set them all to None and leave blank. This is also different from what I suggested from importing from a card. You may have already worked on these images in Lightroom—sorted, rated, and even developed them—and applying any of these settings may alter what you’ve already done. For instance, some of my drives have pictures from Nikon, Canon, and Panasonic cameras on them, and I’ve already made develop adjustments; these develop settings could be completely ruined if I apply one of my import presets. Now just press the Import button at the bottom right of the window. CONCLUSION When the Import is finished, you’ll see your new drive added as a tab on the left side in the Library Module and your complete file tree of any folders that contained images will be available without any changes made. You’ll be able to click into any of your folders and have your pictures at your fingertips. 51 S E C T I O N 10 | A D D I N G A N E X T E R N A L D R I V E
  51. 51. Unless you are working with other photographers in a network environment, the first rule in creating a catalog is to develop a folder structure that makes sense to you. If you are in a network environment with other photographers this may get a little complicated causing you to compromise. I am a keyboard shortcut (KBS) advocate and self proclaimed super user to the point that I have to think about which menu a function is under when using a mouse to choose. Here are the ones I use most. TEN KEYBOARD SHORTCUTS K E V I N A M E S S E C T I O N 11
  52. 52. G Grid mode in the Library module E Loupe mode enlarges the most selected photo in the Grid mode N Survey mode puts only selected photos on the screen F2 Rename selected photos Cmd + Shift + I ! Import images
 Ctrl+Shit+I F Full Screen Preview Shift + Tab Hides Lightroom’s sidebars and filmstrip for more room Shift + F Cycle screen modes to create more display real estate 1-5 Star Rating Cmd + / ! ! Display Keyboard Shortcuts! 
 Ctrl+/ 53 S E C T I O N 11S E C T I O N 11 | T E N K E Y B O A R D S H O R T C U T S
  53. 53. Unless you are working with other photographers in a network environment, the first rule in creating a catalog is to develop a folder structure that makes sense to you. If you are in a network environment with other photographers this may get a little complicated causing you to compromise. Many photographers are passionate about their naming conventions. Some insist that the date absolutely must be in the file name. Others agree but say the client’s name and job description has to be in it too. Still others want to add the location to the file name. USING SERIAL NAMES K E V I N A M E S S E C T I O N 12
  54. 54. FILE NAMING: THE VALUE OF SERIAL NUMBERS Adding all of this information might produce a file name like this one: 2015-09-27 Amy Patterson Beauty Portfolio Photographs at Kevin Ames Photography Atlanta GA.CR2. Really? Here’s what a set of these files look like in the Finder and in Lightroom… Is all that information necessary??? Yes, it is necessary. Some of it is already in the file. The rest gets added when the photos are imported. Here’s the break down. The Date: The camera adds it when the shutter is released. The Subject: It’s found in two places: If it’s in the folder name Lightroom adds it. Put the description in the Headline field of your metadata preset. Lightroom adds it to each file as it’s imported. The Location: Put the location in the preset and you’re set. 55 S E C T I O N 12 | U S I N G S E R I A L N A M E S
  55. 55. What’s missing is a way to know right away what is missing. 
 That’s where the serial number comes in. Let’s look at the dictionary: serial number |ˈsɪriəl ˈnəmbər| noun a number showing the position of an item in a series, especially one printed on paper currency or on a manufactured article for the purposes of identification. I add a serial number to everything I shoot. Every project. Every job. Every vacation. Every bit of personal work. Every thing. Each new project gets the next serial number in line. I put the serial number on the folder the photos are in. Each photo gets the serial number for its project in front of the image number and extension. The example I showed above is now 2878-0341.CR2. The folder It’s in is named 2876-Amy Patterson Beauty Portraits. That’s all I need. Everything else is in the metadata. The serial number tells me that nothing is missing. That’s its job. A missing number is a series is obvious. There is no way to tell if a date is missing because nobody does a project every day. You don’t have to change your file naming if you really love it. Do seriously consider adding a serial number followed by a dash to the beginning of each folder containing your photographs. 56 S E C T I O N 12 | U S I N G S E R I A L N A M E S
  56. 56. Add the same serial number and a dash to the front of the existing file name. I keep a spreadsheet with my projects listed by serial number, date, description and location. Once I look up a serial number, I plug it into the top of Lightroom’s Library Filter Bar and all the photos appear. If they are in different folders a right click shows me where it’s located on my Drobo. 
 The Loupe View displays metadata. Set it up using Command (PC: Control) + J. 57 S E C T I O N 12 | U S I N G S E R I A L N A M E S
  57. 57. Unless you are working with other photographers in a network environment, the first rule in creating a catalog is to develop a folder structure that makes sense to you. If you are in a network environment with other photographers this may get a little complicated causing you to compromise. When I first started using Lightroom in 2006, I was excited I could rename my images as I imported them into 
 my catalog. Up to this point, I used the default filename my camera provided; typically DSC followed by a four 
 digit numbering sequence. USING CUSTOM & SERIAL NAMES V A N E L L I S E C T I O N 13
  58. 58. Unhappy with the filename, I asked several photographers what naming convention they used and why. I received lots of advice and settled on using my name plus the four numbering sequence the camera provided. Example: vanelli-0715. The rational; when a person performed an internet search on Vanelli, my images would appear. This came at a price. Although I liked the idea I could find my images on the internet, I had a hard time locating images outside of Lightroom on my local computer. Once Google changed how images were index, I searched for a better naming solution. GOOGLE SEARCH GUIDELINE I turned to Google for advice. They suggested to make your filename a good description of the subject matter of the image. This descriptive filename can give Google clues about the subject matter of the image. For example, Valley-of- Fire-0806.jpg is a lot more informative than DSC0806.JPG. This solution gave me the best of both worlds. By giving my images a descriptive name, I could find them outside of Lightroom on my local computer plus find them on the net. KEEPING THE FOUR DIGIT 
 NUMBERING SEQUENCE I've heard photographers suggest to always start the numbering sequence at zero when importing your images into Lightroom. Example: Valley-of-Fire-0001.NEF. This option could create duplicate filenames if you photograph a person or the same location on a regular basis. I prefer to keep my camera’s default numbering sequence. I have about 197,000 photos in my Lightroom Catalog and have yet to have a duplicate name. 60 S E C T I O N 13 | U S I N G C U S T O M & S E R I A L N A M E S
  59. 59. EXPORTING IMAGES Now that I have my naming structure set, I keep the same structure when I export my images. The only difference is the file extension. Example: Jaci Schreckengost-6117.NEF becomes Jaci Schreckengost-6117.jpg when exported. If I make multiple edits to an image, I add a version number after the sequence number plus added information if I need it. Example: Jaci Schreckengost-6117-2- BW.jpg. This tells me I edited the original file Jaci Schreckengost-6117.NEF twice plus I made this copy Black and White. SUGGESTIONS PORTRAITS: Full Name-sequence number Delaney Goff-3497.NEF EVENTS: Year_Month_Day-sequence number_Team name_vs_Team name 2014_05_03-1005_Syracuse_vs_Colgate.NEF LOCATION: Year_City_State-sequence number 2015_Saint Augustine_FL-1030.NEF ARTWORK: Name of the art piece-original sequence number The Aviator-0806.jpg WILDLIFE: Name-sequence number Baby_Limpkin-0116.NEF 61 S E C T I O N 13 | U S I N G C U S T O M & S E R I A L N A M E S
  60. 60. I’m a bit of a nut, and I while I may seem pretty carefree and easy going about many things, I actually have a few systems that I stick to religiously. S E C T I O N 14 EXPORTS L E V I S I M
  61. 61. I’ve just found that things work best when i always do things the same way. Join me for a shoot and you’ll definitely hear me say, “If you close a bag, lock the bag.” You’ll probably hear me say to put zippers in the middle so I always know where they are, and I always remind myself to put one leg of a tripod downhill so it doesn’t tip easily. Well, join me for a Lightroom class and you’ll certainly hear me say to use Lightroom to manage all your images all the time. ALWAYS USE LIGHTROOM, 
 ALWAYS ADD TO THIS CATALOG If you always use Lightroom to view, edit, and move your images, then you’ll never have any trouble with Lightroom losing track of images. This makes my workflow simpler and keeps my stress levels down—there’re few things that give me as big a thrill of fear as seeing that little question mark on a folder indicating that something is missing. Always using Lightroom includes making sure that all my exported images show up in Lightroom, too. Let me show you how I use the Export Dialog to keep my all my images under control all the time. EXPORT DIALOG Select the picture or pictures you want to export, then open the Export Dialog. This is a keyboard shortcut I highly recommend you remember: Cmd+SHIFT+E. It opens the Export Dialog and I use it several times each day. You could also go up to the File Menu, or you could right click on an image and select Export, but the shortcut is just that much faster, and a few seconds compounded over my last six years of Lightroom use adds up to several hours saved. The first option at the top is Export To: with options for Email, Hard Drive, and CD/ DVD, as well as other plugins you have. I always choose Hard Drive. If it’s going in an email, or onto a CD, I just manage that with my email application or CD burning application. EXPORT LOCATION Export settings are sticky, which means that whatever settings you choose this time will be the same settings the dialog begins with when you open it next time. I love this, because it means I can export individual images to the same place really quickly as I go through a set of images. It’s not the most efficient method, but I often get excited about a few images and want to share them right away while the rest of the pictures may not ever make it to a publicly viewable place. 63 S E C T I O N 14 | E X P O R T S A Quick Note About Exporting Lightroom doesn’t have a Save function; it only updates a file’s metadata, and it won’t apply Develop changes to the original file. The only thing Lightroom can do to your original image file is update the metadata, move it, or delete it. If you want to send a picture to someone or post it online with Develop edits, you’ve got to create a new image file by exporting.
  62. 62. Export To: Specific folder, Choose folder later, or Same folder as original folder. I usually use the first option and the last option. For instance, when I’m writing an article for Photofocus.com, I usually gather several images in a single folder so that I can find them easily for posting even if they are from separate folders on my hard drives. If I’m just exporting a few pictures to email to a client or to share on social media, then I usually use the Same folder as original photo option and then navigate to the folder when prompted by the email or web page to attache the photos. The Choose button is how to select where your pictures will end up when you select Specific folder. Put in Subfolder In both cases above, I often use the check box to Put in Subfolder. Then I’ll choose a name like the subject of my article, or simply “Email” or “Facebook” so it’s easy to find them in my folder structure. I can also easily find these files to delete them when I’m done using them. Add to This Catalog CHECK THIS BOX! My workflow differs from some of the other authors in this option. Like I said above, I use Lightroom to manage all my image files all the time, which means new pictures created by export must be added to the catalog or else I won’t be able to manage them in Lightroom. The new file maintains the original file’s metadata about creation time, so it shows up in the filmstrip right next to the original files. Add to Stack I leave this box unchecked. I typically don’t stack up my files in the filmstrip. I like to see them all right before my eyes. Having said that, with Lightroom’s new abilities, I think it could be really useful to stack HDR sequences and all the photos used in a Panorama. Existing Files: This box is talking about what happens when you have a two files of the same name in a single folder. I like the option Ask what to do because it reminds me that this file already exists there. I usually then choose to Use Unique Names. 64 S E C T I O N 14 | E X P O R T S
  63. 63. I run into this when I’ve exported one file, then gone on to another picture and entered the Export Dialog and then just hit Enter to export with the same settings as the last one—which includes the same name. Lightroom is smart enough to simply add a -1 to the end of the filename for me. It’s quick and simple and gets me moving on to the next picture quickly. 65 S E C T I O N 14 | E X P O R T S Which Folder? If I’m exporting several images from separate folders (such as pictures gathered in a Collection) I may mistakenly select Same folder as original photo as the Export To: option, which will put all the new exported files into their respective original folders, which makes them really hard to find. In this case, I go the Library Module and on the left side under the Catalog Tab there’s a helpful option called Added by Previous Export. Click here and you’ll see a collection of all the new pictures you just made, and you can select them all and drag them together to a better folder location. Check out the other options here—you can bet I’ve used them all when I’ve made a mistake. Whew! This little collection has saved me a ton of trouble over the years.
  64. 64. FILE NAMING I usually check the box to Rename To: and then I select Custom Name-Sequence. In the Custom Text field I enter a descriptive name, or a name that will help with Search Engine Optimization (I’m no specialist on SEO, but I understand that the file name may help people find you when the image is shared online—things like the subject of the photo, your own name, and the places you want to be associated with may help drive traffic your way). I almost always include my name in the file name for one reason: sometimes down the road it’ll be a lot easier to find me again to do more work. You never know when a new marketing director will be hired and not know anything about who made pictures previously. I figure this is one way I can make sure they know where previous picture came from. The Sequence part just adds a number to the end of the file name, and I can choose where that number starts. I leave Extensions set to Lowercase so that the filename isn’t SHOUTING at a reader. VIDEO It’s so cool that we can grade video and even edit clips in Lightroom. However, if you don’t check the box for Include Video Files, then when you export a video file you’ll just get the same file you started with—and that was really frustrating me for a while! Video Format. You can choose to export a file that’s optimized for web and mobile as a H.264 file. If you want the maximum image quality, a DPX image sequence is a professional exchange format used in high end video work. The Original, unedited file can also be saved for processing in another application. Quality. If you choose to export an image sequence (DPX file) than you can specify a frame rate of either 24, 25, or 30 frames per second. If recompressing to a H.264 file than you can choose from four quality options. The least compressed is Max, followed by High, Medium and Low. 66 S E C T I O N 14 | E X P O R T S
  65. 65. FILE SETTINGS Image Format: I usually choose JPEG because I’m usually generating a new file to be shared with a client as a final image, or for sharing on social media. I will often create a DNG file, too, which is powerful because it keeps the all the settings I made in the Develop Module. This means that if I email you a DNG, and you open in Lightroom or Adobe Camera RAW, you’ll see all the settings placed where I put them, and you could make further adjustments to the original image yourself. It’s been a powerful teaching tool. DNG is also the only RAW format Lightroom will export. If you choose DNG, then you’ll see that several of the following options are not available. Quality: This setting is good to adjust because it has a huge impact on your file size, and it can mean the difference between a file small enough to email, and one that is just too large to manage. There are loads of article online about exactly what settings have what impact. I’ll just tell you that the visible difference between 90 and 100 is imperceptible, but the file size is a lot smaller at 90. Also, I usually set it at 75 for sharing online and I can’t see any degradation. Color Space: This is a really important setting. If you’re emailing a final image to a client, or sharing a file online, choose sRGB. If you choose anything else, the photo will probably look really terrible, and probably kinda green. The internet sees color in sRGB. 
 
 Color Space relates to how many colors can be seen in your image, and the difference between each of these three options is huge. But unless your sending it to another imaging professional, use sRGB. If you’re sending it to me, use ProPhoto RGB because I’ll be viewing it in Lightroom and Lightroom can interpret that many colors. If you send it to a lab for printing, you may be able to use Adobe 1998, but you should consult with your lab first. Limit File Size To: This is handy if you’ve been given specific guidelines for how large an image file may be—as with many online photo contests—otherwise, I leave it unchecked. 67 S E C T I O N 14 | E X P O R T S
  66. 66. IMAGE RESIZING Resize to Fit: I often use this to resize images for sharing online, or for my clients to share images online. There are options for Width and Height, Dimensions, Long Edge, Short Edge, Megapixels, and Percentage. My most common choice is Long Edge, and then I set the length to 2048 pixels—which makes an optimal image for sharing on Facebook, Instagram, and even Lightroom Mobile (which uses smart previews created at this size). I also set the resolution to 72 pixels per inch when sharing online. If I’m exporting for print, I usually choose 240 pixels per inch and I uncheck the box to Resize to Fit. You're camera makes a picture that is a certain number of pixels wide, by a certain number of pixels high. Multiply these two numbers, and you get the number of Megapixels your camera sensor records. That’s all that megapixels means—the size of the picture (isn’t it silly, then, that camera companies have us using this number to compare the capabilities of cameras?). For instance, my 16 megapixel Lumix GH4 makes an image 4608 pixels wide by 3456 pixels high. Now, if I tell Lightroom to export a new picture with dimensions great than that, it will resize the image to become larger—and it does a pretty good job! I could go to Photoshop or onOne Perfect Resize, but for most work, Lightroom itself does a pretty fine job of making a small picture larger. If you don’t want Lightroom to make the image larger (for instance, you might be exporting a batch of images all at once, but some are cropped smaller than the output dimensions you’ve specified) then you can check the Don’t Enlarge box. OUTPUT SHARPENING I always use this, and I’ve had good results, even if I’ve already sharpened in the Develop Module (which I usually haven’t). Check the box to Sharpen For: and choose the option that best fits your viewing intention; mine is usually set to Screen, but if I’m printing with a lab I’ll choose Glossy Paper (yes, even if I choose a ‘Matte’ paper from my lab; I find that matte photographic paper from a local store is usually just a textured glossy paper). If I’m using a fine art paper either in my own printer or with a lab—especially those from ink jet printers—I’ll choose Matte Paper. Don’t sweat it if you forget to change this option, though. When the Amount is set to Standard it’s really not that big a difference between them to my eyes. 68 S E C T I O N 14 | E X P O R T S
  67. 67. If you see a big difference, then you’re probably more skilled at sharpening than I am, and have probably already sharpened your image in Develop Module, Photoshop, or some other application, and you should uncheck the box :) METADATA Remember, metadata includes a lot of information that you can’t see in a picture. There’s a lot to consider as you choose which things to Include. Since I’m an educator and I love to share my pictures and how they were made, I’ve left mine set to All Metadata, so if you use a metadata reader on my images on Photofocus you’ll find all the information about how I made my picture including what camera, exposure settings, and even if I used a flash. (To read metadata, I usually use Jeffrey Friedl’s Exif viewer at regal.info/efix.cgi) I don’t even mind if you know where I took the image, and I don’t use Lightroom’s person identification tools so I’m not worried about the checkboxes for removing those. I do check Write Keywords as Lightroom Hierarchy because, as I discussed above, I want this new exported image to show up in Lightroom, and I want the keywords associated with it to show up, too. Plus, these keywords may help with SEO. What ever you do, I suggest you at least include your own copyright info with the image. WATERMARKING This is one of the best tools in Lightroom, and it helps answer one of Photographers’ most often asked questions: how do I protect my copyright? I’m no lawyer, and I’m not an expert on copyright (I recommend you to the many excellent resources published by the American Society of Media Professionals at ASMP.org for factual advice on copyright). However, even I know that sticking my name and/or logo on an image is a good idea for two reasons. First and foremost, it helps people find me, the creator of the image, without having to look very far. The fact is, any image posted online is likely to be copied and used somewhere else—sometimes harmlessly, and sometimes it’s outright 69 S E C T I O N 14 | E X P O R T S
  68. 68. theft. Most people, though, are not trying to rip you off, and if they share a photograph online, what better way to let people know where it came from than to have your name or logo in the corner of the image. To me, that’s free advertising. Second, it probably does help a copyright suit, if you ever pursue one to have placed your name on the image. It’s a lot harder for someone to claim innocence if they had to actively remove your watermark from the picture before using it. A bit of unsolicited advice: don’t put your name in big letters across the middle of an image you share on social media. Yes, it deters people from stealing it. But it also deters people from enjoying it! Words steal the mind’s attention even faster than a bright spot in a picture. When you post an image with big letters on it, I can’t enjoy the picture itself because all I can see is the word. With that, click the checkbox that says Watermark: and then choose Edit Watermarks… from the drop down menu. If you choose the Simple Copyright Watermark, Lightroom will use the information from your IPTC entries to tag the image. If you’ve already made some custom watermark settings, those will be available in the drop down menu, too. Watermarks cannot be applied to DNG files, so the options are not available. WATERMARKING EDITOR This is a pretty self explanatory tool, and you’d do well to spend a few minutes playing with the different options. It’s simple to create a text watermark, with loads of options for fonts, colors, weights, placement— start by typing in the field underneath your image. I wish there was a freehand placement option, but as it is you can get your watermark to appear almost anywhere on the image by using the Anchor and Inset options. It’s good to note that the Watermark Editor window can be resized as large as you like to see how your watermark will appear on the preview image, and you can use the arrow keys at the top to cycle to the next image if you’ve selected more than one for import. Your watermark will appear with the same settings in all the images. Text watermarks are fine, but on of the best things about tool is the simplicity of adding a Graphic watermark. Just click on the word Graphic at the top left and then find any jpeg or png file and you can use that as your watermark. 70 S E C T I O N 14 | E X P O R T S
  69. 69. Make a watermark in Photoshop by creating a graphic and placing it on a transparent background, then saving it a .png file. Lightroom will maintain the transparent background in the watermark and you’ll have your logo looking great on your images. Hit the save button in the bottom right corner to use this Watermark again. In my work, sometimes a watermark looks good in the bottom left corner, and other times it looks best in the top left. I save a watermark with an indicator at the end reminding me where it falls on the picture so that I can choose the right one from the Export Dialog without entering the Watermark Editor each time. For instance, I’ve saved one watermark of my logo for each corner and they are called Logo BL, Logo BR, Logo TL, and Logo TR (top right). Consider the objective of your watermark and size it accordingly with the right amount of opacity. Is it’s purpose to main attraction of your image? Or is it an unobtrusive calling card ready when needed? POST-PROCESSING This is one tool I’ve never used. I always leave the After Export: options set to Do nothing, or Show in Finder. You can set it to open your new file in another application; myself, if I ‘m going to open it in a another application, I do it from Lightroom so that the new file will be imported back into Lightroom when I close. 71 S E C T I O N 14 | E X P O R T S
  70. 70. GET ORGANIZEDC H A P T E R 2
  71. 71. Metadata is a set of data that describes and gives information about other data. In photography, metadata contains valuable information about a photo. Most digital cameras automatically attach some basic information about a file, such as height, width, file format, and the time the image was taken. S E C T I O N 1 THE VALUE OF METADATA V A N E L L I
  72. 72. THE VALUE OF METADATA This is great, however, the real power of metadata is when data and information is entered into the image file by users. Fortunately, Lightroom makes adding copyright information, applying keywords or adding labels to an image’s metadata easy. This information can be used to search and organize images in our Lightroom catalog. USER ENTERED METADATA Tagging images, creating a rating system and adding keywords to images can be time consuming. Disciplining yourself to add key information – copyright information, proper filenames, keywords – to your images when importing them will keep your photographs organize and cut down on the amount of time you need to manually enter this information. FILTERING MISSING METADATA If you haven’t started adding metadata to your images, don’t worry, Lightroom’s filter options will help you to find missing metadata so you can add this information. You can search images that don’t have copyright information, select them all, then batch enter the information. The same can be applied to untitled filenames. The key is to add information to an image that will help you to quickly find them in the future. Your search results will only be as good as the information you entered in the metadata. 74 S E C T I O N 1 | T H E V A L U E O F M E T A D A T A
  73. 73. Metadata is a set of standardized information about a photo, such as the author’s name, resolution, color space, copyright, and keywords applied to it. Lightroom makes adding this information to our images very easy especially when we import the images for the first time. Open the Import dialog by clicking File then select Import Photos and Video. The import dialog box appears. S E C T I O N 2 ADDING METADATA ON IMPORT V A N E L L I
  74. 74. COPYRIGHT METADATA You've already learned that s a good idea to add copyright information to your images. This allows anyone viewing your image on the web or preparing the file for print at a printing lab to determine who owns the copyright of the image and what they can do with it. The copyright metadata can also supply information on how to contact you if they need permission to use your photo. Most cameras have this feature built in – you may need to look through your camera's manual to find where to add the information – but Lightroom makes this task really easy by creating a preset. Step One: On the right side is the Apply During Import panel. Click the drop down next to Metadata, and choose New – or Edit if you have an existing preset. Step Two: Type a name for the preset at the top, scroll down to the IPTC Copyright section and fill it out. • To create the © symbol on a Mac, press Option+G. • On a PC use the numeric keypad. Press and hold the Alt key then type 0169. The Copyright Info URL field is used to provide a link to somewhere on your website where you have posted specific rights and usage terms for your photos. In the IPTC Creator section, add your name in the Creator field, and add as much contact information as you wish. Make sure that it is sufficient that someone can successfully contact you if they come across your photo. 76 S E C T I O N 2 | A D D I N G M E T A D A T A O N I M P O R T
  75. 75. Step Three: When you are done, click Create. This preset will now show in the Apply During Import dialog as the default, and this information will be applied automatically as you import new photos. 77 S E C T I O N 2 | A D D I N G M E T A D A T A O N I M P O R T
  76. 76. Keywords describe the contents of a photo. A successful keyword workflow will help identify, search for, and quickly find photos in a catalog with thousands of images. Once applied, keywords can be read by any application that support XMP metadata. Lightroom provides several ways to apply keywords to photos. You can type or select them in the Keywording panel, or drag photos to specific keywords in the Keyword List panel. Once keywords are added to an image, a thumbnail badge will display when in Grid view. S E C T I O N 3 ADDING KEYWORDS V A N E L L I
  77. 77. KEYWORDING PANEL There are a few different methods of applying keywords to an image. Each method requires that you select at least one photo. With an image selected, type one keyword at a time in the small field that says “Click here to add keywords.” Press enter to add the keyword to the white keyword box. Lightroom automatically adds a comma to separate multiple keywords when using this method. You can type directly in the keyword box, be sure to add a comma to separate each word. KEYWORD LIST PANEL When a keyword is added to an image, Lightroom stores the information in a list. When you start to type a word, Lightroom displays a dropdown list with the previous words you entered. This ensures the same spelling each time plus it speeds up the process. These words can be found in the Keyword List Panel. You can add, edit or delete keywords from this panel by right mouse clicking on a word. 79 S E C T I O N 3 | A D D I N G K E Y W O R D S
  78. 78. CREATE KEYWORD SHORTCUTS Keyword shortcuts let you quickly apply one or more keywords to multiple photos. After you define the shortcut, you apply it to multiple images. Step One: In the Library module, Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac OS) on one keyword in the Keyword List panel and choose Use This As Keyword Shortcut from the menu. Step Two: In the Set Keyword Shortcut dialog box, type one or more keywords, separating them with commas, and then click Save. A Plus sign (+) next to a keyword in the Keyword List panel indicates that it is part of the current keyword shortcut. 80 S E C T I O N 3 | A D D I N G K E Y W O R D S
  79. 79. APPLY KEYWORDS USING SHORTCUTS Step One: To apply the keyword shortcut, select one or more photos in the Gridview . Step Two: Click the small box next to the keyword shortcut in the Keyword List panel. A checkmark with indicate the image has the keyword shortcut applied. Step Three: To view the keyword for the selected images, go to the Keywording Panel and select Will Export from the Keyword Tag dropdown menu. 81 S E C T I O N 3 | A D D I N G K E Y W O R D S
  80. 80. Giving our images descriptive filenames helps keep everything organized both inside and outside of Lightroom. The best time to rename your files in when you’re first importing them into Lightroom. S E C T I O N 4 FILE RENAMING ON IMPORT N I C K M I N O R E
  81. 81. On the right side of Lightroom’s import window, toggle open the File Renaming panel. Put a check where it says Rename Files to enable this feature. We can choose one of Lightroom’s built-in templates by clicking on the Template dropdown or create our own custom template by clicking on Edit. Let’s choose to build our own template, so click on Edit. Inside the Filename Template Editor, we can customize our template. If there’s anything already in the white box at the top, go ahead and delete it. Near the bottom of the window, find Custom Text and click the Insert button. This will let us add descriptive text to the beginning of our filename. Remember that we’re building a template right now, so we don’t want to add the actual text in here. On the File Renaming panel, there’s a box for our custom text that we can use each time we import new images. Continuing on, I added an underscore by pressing Shift-Hyphen on your keyboard. 83 S E C T I O N 4 | F I L E R E N A M I N G O N I M P O R T
  82. 82. These images need to be kept in sequential order, so under numbering choose the Sequence # dropdown and make sure it has 4 digits (0001). This is so we can import up to 9999 images at one time without a duplicate image number. Click Insert to add it to the template. Look up into the white space at the top of the Filename Template Editor and make sure there isn’t a duplicate number. If there is, click on the blue box you want to delete and press Delete on the keyboard. Lightroom gives us a sample filename on top of the white box. Take a look at the example filename and make sure that’s how you want it to look. If it’s good, then click Done. With Custom Settings selected as the Template, we can now add Custom Text. 2015-03-16_ND_Scout_ I like to add a reverse date (2015-03-16 or 20150316) and then the name of my photo shoot. Adding a hyphen or underscore helps to separate words in the filename, without putting spaces in the name. Lightroom will add the sequence number at the end of your filename, so you won’t need to put it in the Custom Text box. 2015-03-16_ND_Scout_0001.nef Double-check the sample text and make sure it looks good. If you can’t see all the text, hover your mouse over the sample text and a box will appear with your filename. Before you click import, make sure to specify a destination for Lightroom to import your images to. When you click Import, Lightroom will rename your photos automatically. 84 S E C T I O N 4 | F I L E R E N A M I N G O N I M P O R T
  83. 83. Your images are already in Lightroom, and you’ve never given them a descriptive name. Lightroom has a built-in Rename Photos command that gives you the same options as when you first import your images. S E C T I O N 5 BATCH RENAMING N I C K M I N O R E
  84. 84. First select the images you’d like to rename. A quick way to select all images is using the keyboard shortcut Command or Control-A. BUILDING THE TEMPLATE From the Library menu, choose Rename Photos. A popup box will appear, asking you to select a renaming preset. If you’ve never created a renaming preset, you can choose one of the build-in templates or create your own. Creating our own gives us the ultimate flexibility, so we’ll build our own using the Edit option. Clicking on Edit opens the Filename Template Editor. If there’s anything already in the white box at the top, go ahead and delete it. Near the bottom of the window, find Custom Text and click the Insert button. This will let us add descriptive text to the beginning of our filename. 87 S E C T I O N 5 | B A T C H R E N A M I N G
  85. 85. Remember that we’re building a template right now, so we don’t want to add the actual text in here. On the File Renaming panel, there’s a box for our custom text that we can use each time we import new images. Continuing on, I added an underscore by pressing Shift-Hyphen on your keyboard. These images need to be kept in sequential order, so under numbering choose the Sequence # dropdown and make sure it has 4 digits (0001). This is so we can import up to 9999 images at one time without a duplicate image number. Click Insert to add it to the template. Look up into the white space at the top of the Filename Template Editor and make sure there isn’t a duplicate number. If there is, click on the blue box you want to delete and press Delete on the keyboard. Lightroom gives us a sample filename on top of the white box. Take a look at the example filename and make sure that’s how you want it to look. If it’s good, then click Done. With Custom Settings selected as the Template, we can now add Custom Text. 88 S E C T I O N 5 | B A T C H R E N A M I N G
  86. 86. I like to add a reverse date (2015-03-26 or 20150326) and then the name of my photo shoot. Adding a hyphen or underscore helps to separate words in the filename, without putting spaces in the name. Lightroom will add the sequence number at the end of your filename, so you won’t need to put it in the Custom Text box. Double-check the sample text and make sure it looks good. If you can’t see all the text, hover your mouse over the sample text and a box will appear with your filename. If everything looks good, then click Ok. Lightroom will quickly rename all the selected images in the background. 89 S E C T I O N 5 | B A T C H R E N A M I N G
  87. 87. I love collections! It’s hard to believe there was a time when I didn’t use them at all. Nowadays, I can’t even imagine my workflow without them. They are simply the easiest way to stay organized and keep my best work at my fingertips. Let me show you how collections work, then I’ll show you the four ways I use collections everyday. S E C T I O N 6 USINGCOLLECTIONS L E V I S I M
  88. 88. WHAT’S A COLLECTION? Collections are like a little catalog of certain pictures, usually related by topic. You can collect a lot of pictures here from different folders. The key thing is, Lightroom doesn’t make a new copy of your file to store in the collection—it just references the original. Get it? A handy place to keep your best pictures without taking any more space on your hard drives. MAKE A COLLECTION FROM ANYWHERE One of my favorite features of collections is that they are available anywhere in Lightroom—all the modules include the Collections Tab on the left side, and you can make a new collection anytime. Just select a picture or pictures you want to include in the collection and click the + button on the right side of the Collections Tab, then select Create Collection. Vanelli already told you how to use Smart Collections (Chapter Link to Smart Collections) and a Collection Set is simply a folder to hold more than one collection—more on this idea below. Name the new collection anything you like (we’ll talk more about this below). In this case, I’ll call it Jules since that’s the client whose photos I’m working with. I might choose to include this in a Collection Set, but the set must already be established. A reasonable set here might be “Clients”. Since I’ve already got some of the pictures for the collection selected, I do want to check the box Include selected photos, but I won’t choose to Make new virtual copies. An instance when I will make new virtual copies is when I’m preparing black and white versions of all the photos; then I might call the collection, “Jules BW”. If I make any changes to an image in a collection, those changes will show up in the main folder the Library, 91 S E C T I O N 6
  89. 89. which is why it may be a good idea to make new virtual copies if I’m going to be making changes to the pictures but still want to preserve an original edit. Set as target collection is a handy option. If you click it, then anytime you press the B key, the image you’re looking at will be added to this collection. After my initial sort of images, I might use this option to add my favorites from Jules’ shoot to this collection. My normal operating procedure, however, is to have my collection called Instagram set as the target collection. More on this below, too. New for Lightroom CC, Sync with Lightroom mobile is now checked by default the first time you create a collection. If you uncheck it, the setting is sticky and it will be unchecked the next time you create a collection. Now just click Create and you’ll have a new collection. FOUR WAYS TO USE COLLECTIONS 1. PORTFOLIOS The number one way I think everyone should use collections is as a ready portfolio, and believe me, your spouse will thank me for this. You know how it is, you go on vacation, you make thousands of pictures, but only a handful are really worth sharing. Then your friends come to visit and want to see your pictures. If you’re not using collections (or, worse still, not using Lightroom) then you have to flick through your thousands saying things like, “This was right before the really good one…oh here it is….this isn’t the one I wanted to show you, but I can’t find the best one…and now let me show you some from the second day of our trip…” If it were me, I’d be putting myself to sleep. 92 S E C T I O N 6 | U S I N G C O L L E C T I O N S Levi’s Dirty Secret Here it is, I’m spilling my guts: my Collections Tab didn’t look so neat yesterday. I straighten it up and organized things more neatly for the screen shots for this book. (kinda like when you know guests are coming over and you throw everything in the closet) I deleted some scrap collections and several incomplete ones, and a bunch that I had used briefly to gather some pictures for an obscure project. But that’s what’s so cool about collections—you can use them however you like, make a mess, and then delete them at will. They don’t affect your Library structure in the least, and deleting a picture from a

×