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SharePoint Information Architecture & Usability - SharePoint Saturday The Conference

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SharePoint Information Architecture & Usability - SharePoint Saturday The Conference

  1. 1. SharePointInformation Architecture That Really Works<br />Facilitated By: Richard Harbridge and Virgil Carroll<br />Tweet Us: #SPSTCDC @RHarbridge @VCMonkey<br />
  2. 2. Please turn off all electronic devices or set them to vibrate.<br />If you must take a phone call, please do so in the hall so as not to disturb others.<br />Open wireless access is available at SSID: SPSTCDC2011<br />Feel free to “tweet and blog” during the session<br />Thanks to our Diamond and Platinum Sponsors:<br />
  3. 3. Who am I?<br />I<br />
  4. 4. From the great State of Alaska<br />Masters in Instructional Design <br />Working with SharePoint since v.1<br />User Experience Advocate<br />Certified Athletic Trainer<br />Blog: http://monkeyblog.highmonkey.com<br />Twitter: @vcmonkey<br />
  5. 5.
  6. 6. Information Architecture is a Practice not a Strategy<br />
  7. 7. In IA, there is no single “right answer”.<br />
  8. 8. Proven Success<br />
  9. 9. Take Away: Confidence<br />
  10. 10. Take Away: Improved Communication<br />
  11. 11. Take Away: Knowledge YouCan Use<br />
  12. 12. Our Goal Today…<br />From Here To Here<br />
  13. 13. What We Will Cover Today:<br />Why SharePoint InformationSystems Fail<br />What Makes an IA Strategy Really Work<br />Visualizingand Communicating IA Concepts<br />Making Information Architecture Decisions<br />Case Study Approach (Implementing SharePoint IA)<br />Information Architecture Tips and Tricks<br />
  14. 14. What We Won’t Cover (In Depth) Today:<br />Records Management (and Information Policies)<br />Search Architecture and Considerations<br />Planning For Multiple Languages<br />Column Decisions (Choice Column vs Managed Metadata Column vs Lookup Column etc…)<br />Technical Considerations for Permissions Management<br />Audience Targeting<br />
  15. 15. Why SharePoint Information Systems Fail<br />What Makes an IA Strategy Really Work<br />Visualizing and Communicating IA Concepts<br />Making Information Architecture Decisions<br />Case Study Approach (Implementing SharePoint IA)<br />Information Architecture Tips and Tricks<br />
  16. 16. Why SharePointIA Fails<br />
  17. 17. #1<br />NO PLAN<br />(or it was small)<br />
  18. 18. It started out simple<br />
  19. 19. Then it grew<br />
  20. 20. Then it got TOTALLY out of control!!<br />
  21. 21. SharePoint is not a Silver Bullet…<br />SharePoint is not a Silver Bullet at NothingButSharePoint.com<br />
  22. 22. SharePoint will be…<br /><ul><li>Utilized by Business Users to develop and implement business solutions that use technology without IT’s direct involvement.
  23. 23. Our primary unified application delivery platform.
  24. 24. Our primary workflow/business process automation platform.
  25. 25. Our intranet and communication center for internal corporate communications.
  26. 26. …</li></ul>SharePoint will not be…<br /><ul><li>Our (external) web content management platform.
  27. 27. Our primary document management platform.
  28. 28. Our contact management platform.
  29. 29. …</li></li></ul><li>#2<br />BUSINESS DOES NOT WORK THE WAY WE THOUGHT<br />
  30. 30.
  31. 31. Opportunistic Driven Learning<br />Image from Paul Culmsee<br />
  32. 32. #3<br />WE THOUGHT<br />ORG CHART = SITE MAP<br />
  33. 33. #4<br />WE BELIEVED MICROSOFT KNEW DESIGN<br />(instead learning from users)<br />
  34. 34. #5<br />WE THOUGHT IT WAS ABOUT STORING INFORMATION, <br />NOT USING IT<br />
  35. 35. #6<br />NO REVIEWS<br />(or analysis of usage)<br />
  36. 36. The Outcome<br />There are many reasons SharePoint IA can fail and many of us have experienced variations of them firsthand.<br />
  37. 37. What to watch out for…<br />Sometimes failing is necessary to highlight how important effective IA planning and commitment can be.<br />
  38. 38. What We Will Cover Today:<br />Why SharePoint Information Systems Fail<br />What Makes an IA Strategy Really Work<br />Visualizing and Communicating IA Concepts<br />Making Information Architecture Decisions<br />Case Study Approach (Implementing SharePoint IA)<br />Information Architecture Tips and Tricks<br />
  39. 39. What MakesAn IA StrategyREALLYwork<br />
  40. 40. With a good IA… <br />
  41. 41. You can take this…<br />
  42. 42. …and make it into this<br />
  43. 43. This…<br />
  44. 44. …into this<br />
  45. 45. What is information architecture?<br />The structural design of shared information environments.<br />The combination of organization, labeling, search, and navigation systems within web sites and intranets. <br />The art and science of shaping information products and experiences to support usability and findability.<br />
  46. 46. What is information architecture?<br />4 basic IA concepts…<br />Information…<br />Undergoes… Structuring, organizing, and labeling<br />To improve… Finding and managing<br />Through…Art and science<br />
  47. 47. Why IA matters<br />The cost of finding information<br />The cost of not finding information<br />The cost of construction<br />The cost of maintenance<br />The cost of training<br />You can’t understand it something if you don’t organize it!<br />
  48. 48. How is IA broken down?<br />Business goals, funding, politics, culture, technology, resources and constraints<br />Audience, tasks, needs, information seeking behavior, experience<br />Document / data types, content objects, volume, existing structure<br />
  49. 49. Context<br />Context<br />All web sites and intranets exist within a particular business or organizational context.<br />Each organization has a mission, goals, strategy, staff, processes and procedures, physical and technology infrastructure, budget, and culture.<br />The key to success is understanding and alignment.<br />Content<br />Users<br />
  50. 50. Content<br />Context<br />Includes documents, applications, services, schema, and metadata that people need to use or find onyour site.<br /><ul><li>How much content do you have?
  51. 51. What are the formats your content is in?
  52. 52. Who owns your content?</li></ul>Content<br />Users<br />
  53. 53. Users<br />Context<br />Every user has different experiences and abilities to draw from.<br />Every user has different needs and wants.<br />Do you know how your users use your site now?<br />Users<br />Content<br />
  54. 54. What does IA support?<br />
  55. 55. What does IA support?<br />Information architecture starts with the user and why one come to a site in the first place: <br />they have an information need<br />Information needs can vary and each need can cause users to exhibit specific information-seeking behaviors<br />
  56. 56. A good IA… <br />increases our chances of finding the right stuff<br />
  57. 57. How users look for information<br />The too-easy information seeking model<br />
  58. 58. Why doesn’t this model work?<br /><ul><li>Most users don’t know what their looking for
  59. 59. Most users don’t know how to search
  60. 60. Most users don’t have the patience for complicated systems</li></li></ul><li>Find-ability<br />Models<br />
  61. 61. Sometimes you’re just looking for one answer (known-item)<br />
  62. 62. Sometimes you want to investigate(exploratory)<br />
  63. 63. Sometimes you want to find everything(Don’t know what you need)<br />
  64. 64. Sometimes you need to find it again (Re-finding)<br />
  65. 65. Berry Picking Model<br />Search<br />View results<br />Use results to enhance search<br />Repeat until end result is found<br />
  66. 66. Don’t Forget Put-ability<br />Search isn’t a silver bullet.<br />
  67. 67. A good IA…<br />helps us work effectively<br />
  68. 68. Lets look back<br />
  69. 69. A good IA…<br />supports user experience<br />
  70. 70. Supporting user experience<br />If people say your SharePoint ‘sucks’<br />Do you know why and how to fix it?<br />If not, review and test it!<br />
  71. 71. Incorporate Feedback Planning<br />Couldn’t Find What You Were Looking For? Let Us Know (On Search Pages)<br />Intranet Design or Improvement Contests<br />Do You Like The New Homepage Design? Click I Like It or Leave A Note!<br />(Simple front end code/webparts means users don’t even have to go to the ribbon.)<br />Provide Feedback Button & Custom List<br />Want More? Give Users a Bookmark Feature and Analyze User Bookmarks<br />Blog New Features/Changes and Encourage Comments<br />
  72. 72. Plan IA Review Processes<br />
  73. 73. The Outcome<br />A good IA continually improves content find-ability and put-ability while retaining context and usability.<br />
  74. 74. What to watch out for…<br />When defining IA there are always trade-offs. These trade-offs become areas of negotiation and sometimes of conflict.<br />
  75. 75. What We Will Cover Today:<br />Why SharePoint Information Systems Fail<br />What Makes an IA Strategy Really Work<br />Visualizing and CommunicatingIA Concepts<br />Making Information Architecture Decisions<br />Case Study Approach (Implementing SharePoint IA)<br />Information Architecture Tips and Tricks<br />
  76. 76. Visualizing and CommunicatingIA Concepts<br />
  77. 77. Taxonomy and Metadata<br />
  78. 78. Taxonomy and Metadata<br />
  79. 79. What is Taxonomy?<br />or this…<br />Not this!<br />
  80. 80. Taxonomyis….<br />The science of categorization, or classification, of things based on a predetermined system. <br />In reference to web sites and portals, a site’s taxonomy is the way it organizes its data into categories and subcategories.<br />
  81. 81. How do you figure it out<br />Seek and ye shall find<br />Research<br />Ask an expert<br />
  82. 82. Linnaeus vs Buffon<br />Everything can be organized based on a standard!<br />Nay! Each person can organize things based on their own context!<br />Arrangement is key! Arrangement and categorization provides universal context!<br />Context is key! Everything can be organized by multiple facets!<br />
  83. 83. Arrangement and Context<br />Taskonomy?<br />Department Store<br />Wholesale Warehouse<br />
  84. 84. Arrangement Challenges<br />Perfect!<br />Superclass<br />Class<br />What if I want to find an animal by if it lives in water? Or by whether it flies?<br />Order<br />
  85. 85. X Drive Challenges<br />Perfect!<br />Could this be solved by using metadata so that the document could be found by both region and industry?<br />What if I want to find a marketing document by region and not industry? <br />
  86. 86. What is Metadata?<br />The BIG Question<br />
  87. 87. What is Metadata?<br />The BIG Question<br />What is Metadata?<br />I think I get it<br />I think I get it<br />Oh! Now I see(Mostly)<br />
  88. 88. Adapted from the “pea soup” story by Serge Tremblay<br />
  89. 89.
  90. 90.
  91. 91. What is our Base Metaphorfor files?<br />
  92. 92.
  93. 93. What if we saw this?<br />
  94. 94. Better…<br />
  95. 95. Solve with folders<br />
  96. 96. Hire an intern<br />
  97. 97. This is metadata!<br />
  98. 98. As we’ve already seen: This always works out great<br />This is a common result…<br />
  99. 99. Shared Drive Zoo<br />
  100. 100. Moving this mess to SharePoint <br />makes it worse<br />
  101. 101. SharePoint Sux<br />
  102. 102. The #1 rule of SharePoint?<br />Except when it makes sense<br />Never use folders<br />ever<br />
  103. 103. A SharePoint Taxonomy<br />If only there was a way content could be organized so content could be found/viewed in multiple ways…<br />I like it!<br />
  104. 104. Metadata<br />I like it!<br />
  105. 105. Adding Metadata (when uploading)<br />
  106. 106. A SharePoint Simulation<br />
  107. 107. What are content types?<br />
  108. 108. Vacation Request<br />Drug Reimbursement<br />Name _________<br />Emp. # _________<br />Date _________<br />Dates Requested:<br />From __________<br />To: __________<br />Manager ________<br />Approved Y/N<br />Name _________<br />Emp. # _________<br />Date _________<br />Drug Used:<br />Name __________<br />Cost: $ _________<br />Manager ________<br />Approved Y/N<br />
  109. 109. Both Content Types in One Library<br />
  110. 110. Content Types for: <br />Security<br />Workflow,<br />Policy,<br />
  111. 111. CREATE LABELING SUPPORT<br />(metadata)<br />
  112. 112. What is labeling?<br />Labeling is a form of representation. Just as we use spoken words to represent concepts and thoughts, we use labels to represent larger chunks of information in our SharePoint structure.<br />
  113. 113. Creating your labels<br />Start small, grow organically<br />Don’t be afraid of natural language<br />Always label<br />Train your users…right now!<br />Its not a relational database<br />Use Content Type Syndication<br />
  114. 114. Types of labels<br />Contextual links<br />Headings<br />Navigation system choices<br />Index terms<br />Iconic labels<br />
  115. 115. Making your own labels<br />General guidelines<br />Narrow scope whenever possible<br />Develop consistent labeling systems, not labels<br />Ways to find labels<br />Content analysis<br />Card sorting<br />Search log analysis<br />
  116. 116. 2010 takes labeling serious!<br />
  117. 117. The Outcome<br />Shared Understanding Of How Metadata And Taxonomy Can Be Leveraged To Improve ‘Findability’.<br />
  118. 118. What to watch out for…<br />People Must Understand The Value Of Metadata Or They Will Reject The Idea.<br />
  119. 119. Tools For The Information Architect<br />
  120. 120. Same Page<br />
  121. 121. Abstract<br />
  122. 122. Concrete<br />
  123. 123. Mind Mapping Demonstration<br />
  124. 124. Navigation<br /> workshops<br />
  125. 125. Navigational Map<br />
  126. 126. Navigation Systems<br />Global navigation<br />Local navigation<br />Breadcrumbs/Up One Level Control<br />Contextual navigation<br />Supplemental navigation<br />Sitemap<br />A-Z Index<br />Guides<br />
  127. 127. Navigation Systems<br />
  128. 128. Navigation Systems<br />
  129. 129. Navigation Systems<br />
  130. 130. What is Card Sorting?<br />Card sorting is a technique that many information architects (and related professionals) use as an input to the structure of a site or product. <br />
  131. 131. “Card sorting is a great, reliable, inexpensive method for finding patterns in how users would expect to find content or functionality.”<br /> -Donna Spencer<br />http://www.amazon.com/Card-Sorting-ebook/dp/B004VFUOL0<br />http://www.BoxesAndArrows.com<br />
  132. 132. Why use Card Sorting?<br />Card sorting can help you identify trends<br />Do the users want to see the information grouped by subject, process, business group, or information type? <br />How similar are the needs of the different user groups? <br />How many potential main categories are there?<br />What should those groups be called?<br />
  133. 133. Types of Card Sorting<br />Open Card Sorting<br />Participants are given cards showing site content with no pre-established groupings. <br />Closed Card Sorting<br />Participants are given cards showing site content with an established initial set of primary groups.<br />
  134. 134. What are the types of card sort?<br />Open<br />& Closed<br />
  135. 135. Open card sorting process<br />Snake<br />Ferrari<br />Cat<br />Ford<br />Dog<br />Gerbil<br />Honda<br />Rolls Royce<br />Mouse<br />
  136. 136. Results<br />Pets<br />Cars<br />Cat<br />Ferrari<br />Dog<br />Honda<br />Mouse<br />Rolls Royce<br />Gerbil<br />Ford<br />Snake<br />
  137. 137. But not always what you expect<br />Cute<br />European<br />Scary<br />Domestic<br />Ford<br />Cat<br />Ferrari<br />Mouse<br />Rolls Royce<br />Dog<br />Snake<br />Gerbil<br />Japanese<br />Honda<br />
  138. 138. But not always what you expect<br />Animals<br />Luxury<br />Regular<br />Ferrari<br />Cat<br />Ford<br />Rolls Royce<br />Honda<br />Dog<br />Gerbil<br />Mouse<br />Snake<br />
  139. 139. BIG MONKEY<br />Card Sort<br />
  140. 140.
  141. 141. Card Sort Results<br />
  142. 142. Advantages of Card Sorting<br />Simple<br />Cheap<br />Quick to execute<br />Established<br />Involves users<br />Provides a good foundation<br />
  143. 143. Disadvantages of Sorting<br />Does not consider users’ tasks<br />Results may vary <br />Analysis can be time consuming<br />May capture “surface” characteristics only<br />
  144. 144. Wireframing Workshops<br />
  145. 145. Balsamiq<br />
  146. 146. CommonIntranet Components<br />
  147. 147. Balsamiq DEMO<br />
  148. 148. Wireframing Tip!<br />
  149. 149. Don’t Forget Consistency<br />Consistency Across User Environments<br />Modify Provisioned Site (or Templates) Based on Need<br />Each Page Design Should Be Consistent<br />
  150. 150. What is usability<br />Usabilityis aquality attributethat assesses how easy user interfaces are to use.<br />(Jakob Nielsen, 2003)<br />
  151. 151. Usability’s 5 quality components<br />Learnability - how easy can the user accomplish basic tasks?<br />Efficiency– How quickly can tasks be performed?<br />Memorability– After a period of non-use, how easily can a user reestablish proficiency?<br />Errors– How many errors does the user / system make? How severe? Can the user recover?<br />Satisfaction– How pleasant is it to use the design?<br />
  152. 152. Why do we need it?<br />
  153. 153. Why do we need it<br />When an interface doesn’t make sense<br />PEOPLE DON’T USE THEM<br />
  154. 154. Usability Testing<br />
  155. 155. Setting up your Usability Plan<br />Determine what you are trying to find out<br />Establish your purpose<br /><ul><li>why are you testing?
  156. 156. what worries you with your system?</li></ul>What do you really need to test?<br />
  157. 157. Setting up your Usability Plan<br />Design your Test<br />Identify the users you’ll test<br /><ul><li>test at least 5 people
  158. 158. set-up use cases
  159. 159. get permission to use data
  160. 160. get users from different levels of competency</li></li></ul><li>Setting up your Usability Plan<br />Type of Usability Tests<br />Heuristic Evaluation<br />Paper Prototyping<br />Card Sorting<br />Surveys<br />
  161. 161. Setting up your Usability Plan<br />Heuristic Evaluation<br />Having a small set of evaluators examine an interface and judge it against recognized usability principles<br />
  162. 162. Setting up your Usability Plan<br />10 Usability Heuristics<br />Visibility of system status<br />Match between system and real world<br />User control and freedom<br />Consistency and standards<br />Error prevention<br />Recognition rather than recall<br />Flexibility and efficiency of use<br />Aesthetic and minimalist design<br />Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors<br />Help and documentation<br />
  163. 163. Setting up your Usability Plan<br />Design your Test<br />Develop a list of tasks you want the user to perform<br /><ul><li>set-up representative tasks
  164. 164. Complete a process
  165. 165. Find a specific piece of content
  166. 166. Create something</li></li></ul><li>Setting up your Usability Plan<br />Lets look at a <br />sample usability test<br />
  167. 167.
  168. 168. Setting up your Usability Plan<br />Run your Test<br />Re-assure your User<br /><ul><li>go over expectations
  169. 169. make sure the user understands the INTERFACE is being tested, not THEM
  170. 170. Tester should not be a stakeholder</li></li></ul><li>Setting up your Usability Plan<br />Run your Test<br />Run through tasks and collect data<br />do not coach the user<br />ask the user to verbalize their tasks<br />time??<br />
  171. 171. Setting up your Usability Plan<br />Run your Test<br />Debrief user<br />ask about overall experience<br />ask for suggestions<br />THANK THEM<br />
  172. 172. Setting up your Usability Plan<br />Analyze / Report<br />Identify the biggest problems 1st<br />grade by severity<br />Frequency<br />Impact<br />Persistence<br />
  173. 173. Setting up your Usability Plan<br />Analyze / Report<br />Summarize data<br />summarize in human terms<br />identify most common user issues<br />
  174. 174. FIGURE OUT YOUR CONTENT<br />
  175. 175. Document Inventory Workshops<br />
  176. 176. Identify content stakeholders<br />Questions to ask:<br />Who in your organization creates content?<br />What type of content do they create?<br />Who reviews content?<br />Who edits content?<br />Who uses content?<br />Who approves the publication of content?<br />Who designs the sites that host the content?<br />Who sets the policies for managing content?<br />Who monitors the content in your organization?<br />
  177. 177. An Inventory Worksheet<br />
  178. 178. Build Mind Map (based on an inventory worksheet)<br />
  179. 179. Analyze content usage<br />What type of content is it?<br />What is the purpose of the content?<br />Who is the author of the content?<br />What format is the content in?<br />Who uses the content?<br />Where is the content currently located?<br />
  180. 180. Plan the flow of content<br />Content is often dynamic, moving from one place to another or from one person to another. Managing this process can be an important success step in content management<br />
  181. 181. Plan the flow of content<br />Scenarios<br />Document is authored by a team in one location and published to another upon completion<br />Web pages can be created in a development site and published to a public site<br />Content that needs to be retained or archived can be moved once its usefulness has been fulfilled.<br />Users can move content from a network share or folder to a document library<br />
  182. 182. ORGANIZE WHAT YOU FIND<br />
  183. 183. Types of Organizing Schemes<br />Objective organizational schemes <br />Alphabetical<br />Chronological<br />Geographical<br />Subjective organizational schemes<br />Topic<br />Task<br />Audience<br />Metaphor<br />Hybrids<br />
  184. 184. Challenges of Organizing Info<br />Ambiguity<br />What kind of language is being used<br />i.e. BSE vs Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy<br />Heterogeneity / Homogeneous<br />i.e. storing all project documents vs. storing project plans<br />Differences in perspectives<br />i.e. Looking for invoice by client vs. by project<br />Internal politics<br />Mine, mine, mine!!!<br />
  185. 185. No Single “Approach”<br />Projects<br />Communities<br />Tasks<br />Practices<br />
  186. 186. Business Process Workshops<br />
  187. 187. Visio 2010 Demo<br />
  188. 188. Common Intranet Processes<br /><ul><li>Absence Reporting and Vacation Scheduling
  189. 189. Expense Reimbursement
  190. 190. Equipment and Room Reservation and Management
  191. 191. Meeting Planning and Management
  192. 192. Policy Review and Approval
  193. 193. Booking Travel
  194. 194. Interview Management and Hiring Processes
  195. 195. Training Sign Up and Management
  196. 196. Event Planning
  197. 197. Change Request Management
  198. 198. Timecard/Time Tracking
  199. 199. Product Planning
  200. 200. Help Desk Ticket Management
  201. 201. Compliance Support
  202. 202. Contacts Management
  203. 203. Inventory Tracking
  204. 204. Lending Tracking
  205. 205. Sales Lead Pipeline</li></li></ul><li>Roadmap<br />
  206. 206. The Outcome<br />Using visual tools provides shared understanding, which is a crucial driver of shared commitment to a goal.<br />
  207. 207. What to watch out for…<br />Workshops become much more interactive; more people are actively involved which leads to greater shared commitment and understanding.<br />
  208. 208. What We Will Cover Today:<br />Why SharePoint Information Systems Fail<br />What Makes an IA Strategy Really Work<br />Visualizing and Communicating IA Concepts<br />Making Information Architecture Decisions<br />Case Study Approach (Implementing SharePoint IA)<br />Information Architecture Tips and Tricks<br />
  209. 209. Making<br />Information Architecture Decisions<br />
  210. 210. The Importance of Making Good Information Architecture Decisions<br />
  211. 211. What is the ultimate IA structure?<br />There isn’t one!<br />
  212. 212. You need to <br />Un-enterprise your architecture<br />
  213. 213. Why Enterprise IA doesn’t work<br />One IA doesn’t rule them all<br />What happens when it all gets out of control (and it will)<br />Assumes all processes are created equal (and they are not)<br />Global doesn’t necessarily mean better (how many people really need to search everything)<br />Do not fret, there are models that do work….<br />
  214. 214. Information Architecture and Governance Areas<br />Permanent central portal<br />- Few authors/Many readers<br />Communication Portal<br /><ul><li>Central navigation
  215. 215. Central taxonomy
  216. 216. Divisional stakeholders
  217. 217. Enterprise search</li></ul>CentralPortal<br />Departmental sites<br /><ul><li>Departments
  218. 218. Resources
  219. 219. Business Processes</li></ul>- Few authors/Many readers<br />Increasing Strictness of Governance<br />Collaboration<br /><ul><li>Local taxonomies
  220. 220. Local search</li></ul>Semi Structured <br />Team sites<br />- Multiple authors<br />Blogs, bios, <br />Social<br />Personal<br />Above The Line versus Below The Line<br />
  221. 221. Recommended Approach<br />Bob Mixon on SharePoint 2007 Site Collections <br />
  222. 222. Enterprise Publishing<br />Many consumer, few contributors<br />Examples: Company communications, employee relations, sales & marketing, human resources<br />IA rules<br />Content tends to be highly controlled & published via established processes<br />Content is published via a ‘push’ method<br />Ability to interact is ‘locked down’<br />Information is well defined and frequently accessed<br />Access to SharePoint publishing support feature set<br />
  223. 223. Enterprise Publishing<br />
  224. 224. Enterprise Collaboration<br />Many contributors, mature processes<br />Examples: Help desk, Job request, Process tracking, Document Management system<br />IA rules<br />Processes have been refined and well documented<br />User interaction is well defined and tested<br />Contributors are well trained<br />Access to the full SharePoint feature set<br />
  225. 225. And for the rest of us?<br />
  226. 226. Teams & Other Junk<br />Many contributors, no control<br />Examples: Team sites, Temporary projects, Departmental sharing<br />IA rules<br />Tightly governed and ‘locked down’<br />Contributor can do what they want, but have limited abilities<br />Support is minimal<br />Does not participate in Enterprise processes (i.e. global search, managed metadata practices, retention policies)<br />Access to limited SharePoint feature set<br />
  227. 227. How can SharePoint help?<br />
  228. 228. SharePoint Containment Hierarchy<br />What we care about from an information architecture perspective.<br />
  229. 229. SharePoint Containment Hierarchy<br />
  230. 230. Site Collection or Site (Subsite)?<br />OR<br />
  231. 231. Site Collection<br />
  232. 232. Site Collection<br />
  233. 233. When To Use A Site Collection<br />
  234. 234. When To Use A Site Collection<br />
  235. 235. When To Use A Site Collection<br />
  236. 236. When To Use A Site Collection<br />
  237. 237. When To Use A Site Collection<br />
  238. 238. When To Use A Site Collection<br />
  239. 239. When To Use A Site Collection<br />Site Collection 1<br />Site Collection 2<br /> Webparts & Aggregation<br /> Webparts & Aggregation<br />Masterpages & Page Layouts<br />Masterpages & Page Layouts<br /> Navigation<br /> Navigation<br /> Search Across Site Collection Boundaries<br />
  240. 240. When To Use A Site Collection<br />Site Collection 1<br />Site Collection 2<br /> Group Y<br /> Group A<br /> Group Z<br /> Group B<br /> Collection Admin Y<br /> Group C<br /> Collection Admin A<br /> Collection Admin Z<br /> Collection Admin B<br />
  241. 241. SharePoint Permissions<br />
  242. 242. Purpose of a List?<br /><ul><li>To Replace Excel Spreadsheets
  243. 243. To Track Complex Input From Multiple People
  244. 244. To Centralize Storage and Retrieval of Content
  245. 245. To Provide Validation, Easy To Use Online Forms
  246. 246. To Reduce Duplication of Effort</li></li></ul><li>One List or Multiple Lists?<br />OR<br />
  247. 247. When To Use a Single List<br /><ul><li>You want to simplify viewing the same set of items. (When dispersed across many lists it requires additional effort to aggregate the lists).
  248. 248. You want to search for items in the same location.(When dispersed across many lists it requires additional effort to configure search scopes).
  249. 249. You want to easily apply consistent versioning, approval, metadata or form settings.
  250. 250. You want to receive consolidated updates on the collection of items (alerts or RSS).</li></li></ul><li>When To Use Multiple Lists<br /><ul><li>You don’t expect people to need summaries of the items together.(When dispersed across many lists it requires additional effort to aggregate the lists).
  251. 251. You need to apply different versioning, approval, metadata, or form settings.
  252. 252. You want to distribute management of versioning, metadata, workflows or form settings.
  253. 253. You do not need to receive consolidated updates (alerts or RSS).</li></li></ul><li>Advanced Uses Of Lists<br />
  254. 254. One Library or Multiple Libraries?<br />OR<br />
  255. 255. When To Use a Single Library<br /><ul><li>You want to simplify viewing the same set of documents. (When dispersed across many libraries it requires additional effort to aggregate the libraries).
  256. 256. You want to search for documents in the same location.(When dispersed across many libraries it requires additional effort to configure search scopes).
  257. 257. You want to easily apply consistent versioning, approval, metadata or form settings.
  258. 258. You want to receive consolidated updates on the collection of documents (alerts or RSS).</li></li></ul><li>When To Use Multiple Libraries<br /><ul><li>You don’t expect people to need summaries of the documents together.(When dispersed across many libraries it requires additional effort to aggregate the libraries).
  259. 259. You need to apply different versioning, approval, metadata, or form settings.
  260. 260. You want to distribute management of versioning, metadata, workflows or form settings.
  261. 261. You do not need to receive consolidated updates (alerts or RSS).</li></li></ul><li>List and Content Type Tip!<br />
  262. 262. Default Content Types and Metadata Values<br />
  263. 263. Navigating with MetadataTip!<br />
  264. 264. Navigating with Metadata, not Folders<br />
  265. 265. Set up with Library Settings<br />
  266. 266. Configure Setttings<br />
  267. 267. Filters the list<br />
  268. 268. Document Routing Tip!<br />
  269. 269. Content Organizer and Routing<br />
  270. 270. Configure the router<br />
  271. 271.
  272. 272. Configure settings<br />
  273. 273. Create Rules<br />
  274. 274. Create/Modify Rules<br />
  275. 275.
  276. 276. Use the Drop-off Library<br />
  277. 277. Add a document<br />
  278. 278. Enter Metadata<br />
  279. 279. Detour: 2010 Metadata<br />
  280. 280.
  281. 281. Back to Drop-off library<br />
  282. 282. Your document was moved<br />
  283. 283. Rules don’t apply…<br />
  284. 284. … it doesn’t get moved<br />
  285. 285. Folder or Metadata?<br />OR<br />
  286. 286. The #1 rule of SharePoint?<br />Except when it makes sense<br />Never use folders<br />ever<br />
  287. 287. What’s wrong with folders?<br />Deep structures hard to navigate<br />Finding stuff is hard<br />Figuring out where to put stuff is even harder<br />Stuck with a rigid structure<br />Search is not the silver bullet<br />
  288. 288. What’s the alternative?<br />metadata<br />
  289. 289. What’s the alternative?<br />
  290. 290. Metadata = No more folders<br />Filtering<br />Views<br />
  291. 291. Really? No more folders? Ever?<br />What situations would you use folders?<br />Subdivide large libraries/lists<br />Security/Permissions<br />Ease of use for users<br />Really? No more folders?<br />Really? <br />
  292. 292. Downsides of Metadata<br />No free lunch (there is pain here)<br />Awful architectural choices to make<br />Multiple site collections<br />Good Practice<br />Bad for Metadata<br />Maintenance headache<br />Can be mitigated <br />Define at top level if possible<br />
  293. 293. Folders for easy permissions<br />Create folder<br />Set permissions<br />Create view without folders<br />Easy for users (they only see what they are supposed to)<br />
  294. 294. Folders and Default Values<br />
  295. 295.
  296. 296. The Sales document library<br />
  297. 297. Drill down into Military folder<br />
  298. 298. Drill down into Air-to-Ground<br />
  299. 299. Add a new document here<br />
  300. 300. Note: Some metadata prefilled<br />
  301. 301. How did we do that?<br />Library tab<br />Library settings<br />
  302. 302. Column default value settings<br />
  303. 303. Select a folder and set defaults<br />Note folder inheritance<br />
  304. 304. Set the default value<br />
  305. 305. in SharePoint 2010<br />Managed Metadata Service<br />Share Metadata across site collections<br />Multilingual Metadata (big gotcha )<br />Hierarchical Metadata<br />Navigate via Metadata (already discussed)<br />Keywords/Folksonomy (Out of scope today)<br />Folders can assign default metadata (already discussed)<br />metadata<br />
  306. 306. Working With Managed Metadata<br />
  307. 307. Term Store Management<br />
  308. 308. Adding Terms<br />
  309. 309. Turn off “Available for Tagging”<br />Add sub elements: Proposal, Quote, Invoice<br />Leave “Available for Tagging checked”<br />
  310. 310. Term Store Manager<br />Painful & Slow<br />Needs a better way<br />I created a ‘toy’ to try out some ideas<br />http://bit.ly/ruveng-mmts<br />Article links to other solutions (Excel)<br />
  311. 311.
  312. 312. CSV file for Import to Term Store<br />
  313. 313. To Sum Up…<br />SharePoint 2007<br />Folders BAAAAD!<br />Never use them<br />Except when the situation warrants<br />SharePoint 2010<br />Folders GOOOOD!<br />Never use them<br />Except when the situation warrants<br />
  314. 314. Folder or Document Set?<br />OR<br />
  315. 315. Folders vs. Document Sets<br />Document Sets vs Folders<br />
  316. 316. Document Sets<br />Document Sets vs Folders<br />
  317. 317. Folders and Default Values<br />
  318. 318. Folders vs. Document Sets<br />Document Sets vs Folders<br />
  319. 319. Folders vs. Document Sets<br />Document Sets vs Folders<br />
  320. 320. Folders vs. Document Sets<br />Document Sets vs Folders<br />
  321. 321. Folders vs. Document Sets<br />Document Sets vs Folders<br />
  322. 322. Folders vs. Document Sets<br />Document Sets vs Folders<br />
  323. 323. Folders vs. Document Sets<br />Document<br />Document<br />Document<br />Folder<br />Document Library<br />Folder<br />Folder<br />Document<br />Folder<br />Document<br />Document Set<br />Folder<br />Document<br />Document Set<br />Document<br />
  324. 324. Great Resource!<br />Scott Jamison and Susan Hanley Wrote…<br />!LINK TO WHITEPAPER!<br />
  325. 325. The Outcome<br />You need to understand all of the SharePoint objects, their limitations, and their benefits to make effective decisions.<br />
  326. 326. What to watch out for…<br />There is always a trade off and all information architecture decisions should be constantly re-evaluated.<br />
  327. 327. What We Will Cover Today:<br />Why SharePoint Information Systems Fail<br />What Makes an IA Strategy Really Work<br />Visualizing and Communicating IA Concepts<br />Making Information Architecture Decisions<br />Case Study Approach (Implementing SharePoint IA)<br />Information Architecture Tips and Tricks<br />
  328. 328. Putting it all Together<br />(a case study approach)<br />
  329. 329. Introducing multiMEGA Industries<br />The world’s leading supplier of Missiles, Produce and Soap<br />
  330. 330. They Want A SharePoint Intranet!<br />
  331. 331. Find and Involve Stakeholders<br />
  332. 332. Educate Stakeholders<br />
  333. 333. Roadmap<br />Plan Their Roadmap<br />
  334. 334. Inventory and Plan for Documents<br />
  335. 335. Analyze Content Usage<br />
  336. 336. Map Business Processes<br />
  337. 337. Determine Navigation<br />
  338. 338. Perform Card Sorting<br />
  339. 339. Structured Approach for Navigation<br />Original Concept – 5 Steps to Structure SharePoint Sites<br />
  340. 340. Wireframing Workshops<br />
  341. 341. CommonIntranet Components<br />
  342. 342. Identify Key Pages<br />
  343. 343. Mockup Key Pages<br />
  344. 344. Improve Usability<br />
  345. 345. Improve Governance<br />
  346. 346. The Outcome<br />A well planned information architecture approach will lead to better results.<br />
  347. 347. What to watch out for…<br />Iterative improvements are necessary and should leverage a model like the one we just walked through.<br />
  348. 348. AND FINALLY<br />PAY ATTENTION!!<br />
  349. 349. What We Will Cover Today:<br />Why SharePoint Information Systems Fail<br />What Makes an IA Strategy Really Work<br />Visualizing and Communicating IA Concepts<br />Making Information Architecture Decisions<br />Case Study Approach (Implementing SharePoint IA)<br />Information Architecture Tips and Tricks<br />
  350. 350. Information Architecture Tips and Tricks<br />
  351. 351. MAKE IT FINDABLE<br />
  352. 352. Search Reality<br />Most users don’t know how to perform searches well<br />
  353. 353. So How Do We Make Search Better<br />Make sure our content is easy to read<br />Index only the data necessary <br />ignore the rest<br />Make the most of the user’s input <br />Refiners<br />query expansion, synonyms, suggestions<br />Build the results page around the users’ needs <br />show relevance<br />Best bets<br />Conditional content – Best bets better<br />
  354. 354. 2010 refiners can get users to content quickly<br />
  355. 355. TRAIN YOUR PEEPS!<br />
  356. 356. 2010 can make training ainteractive process<br />
  357. 357. Productivity Hub<br />
  358. 358. IUseSharePoint<br />Download and install the ‘lunch’ and learn module - an interesting idea.<br />
  359. 359. Make it easier to work with<br />
  360. 360. Make it easier to work with<br />Powerful Columns You Probably Didn’t Know About<br />
  361. 361. Make it easier to work with<br />Why Leveraging SharePoint Blog Features for News is a Great Idea<br />
  362. 362. AD Groups or SharePoint Groups?<br />OR<br />
  363. 363. SharePoint Groups vsAD Groups <br />
  364. 364. Item Level Permissions<br />Best Practices For Using Fine-Grained Permissions Whitepaper<br />
  365. 365. “Item Level” Permissions<br />Best Practices For Using Fine-Grained Permissions Whitepaper<br />
  366. 366. Web Level Permissions<br />Best Practices For Using Fine-Grained Permissions Whitepaper<br />
  367. 367. Targeted Code<br />New in SharePoint 2010 SPRoleAssignmentCollection.AddToCurrentScopeOnly<br />Best Practices For Using Fine-Grained Permissions Whitepaper<br />
  368. 368. The Outcome<br />There are many ways that we can improve usability of SharePoint and as a result improve our Information Architecture.<br />
  369. 369. What to watch out for…<br />Tips and Tricks are not enough to ensure successful Information Architecture.<br />
  370. 370. SharePoint IA That Works Review…<br />Not Practical, Not User Friendly, and Not Planned<br />Improves Find-ability and Put-ability!<br />SharedUnderstanding And SharedCommitment Are Key<br />Every Decision Is More Effective With More Information<br />Practice And Experience Really Help<br />There Is So Much Out There You Can Use To Help<br />Why SharePoint Information Systems Fail<br />What Makes an IA Strategy Really Work<br />Visualizing and Communicating IA Concepts<br />Making Information Architecture Decisions<br />Case Study Approach (Implementing SharePoint IA)<br />Information Architecture Tips and Tricks<br />
  371. 371. Full Name<br />Email Address<br />Allow Us To Keep In Touch And Send You SharePoint Information Architecture Resources<br />Role(s)<br /> IT Pro Developer End User Architect Biz Analyst<br />Helps us understand where yourexperience with SharePoint has been and what roles were contained in our workshop audience. <br />Would you recommend this workshop to a colleague or friend?<br />
  372. 372. What did you likebest or what did you find useful?<br />What was missing or what would you have liked to see?<br />
  373. 373. Please complete and turn in your Session Evaluation Form so we can improve future events. Survey can be filled out at:<br />http://app.fluidsurveys.com/surveys/SPSTCDC2011-Thu-S1A-106<br />Presenter: Richard and Virgil<br />Session Name: SharePoint IA Design 101<br />Session No.: Thu-S1A-106<br />
  374. 374.
  375. 375. Thank You Organizers, Sponsors andYoufor Making this Possible.<br />Questions? Ideas? Feedback? Contact us:<br /><ul><li>Twitter: @VCMonkey & @rharbridge
  376. 376. Blogs: monkeyblog.highmonkey.com & rharbridge.com
  377. 377. Email us: virgil@highmonkey.com & richard@rharbridge.com
  378. 378. Resources: http://www.PracticalIntranet.com</li>

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