#SPFest @RHarbridge
Practical Tools and Techniques
for the SharePoint
Business Analyst &
Information Architect
#SPFest @RH...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Who am I?
Boston
Washington
#SPFest @RHarbridge
SPTechCon
The SharePoint
Technology Conference
SPTechCon
The SharePoint
Technology Conference
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Special Mention…
Ruven Gotz
@ruveng
spinsiders.com/ruveng
ruveng@navantis.com
#SPFest @RHarbridge
What We Will (Try To) Cover Today:
1. Why is SharePoint IA so difficult?
2. Visualizing and Communicat...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Why is SharePoint BA/IA
so difficult?
#SPFest @RHarbridge
SharePoint is huge…
#SPFest @RHarbridge
The people stuff is complex…
#SPFest @RHarbridge
It started out simple
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Then it grew
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Then it got TOTALLY out of control!!
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Decision Makers Cant Seem To
Agree…
Not as much as a kitten
picture rotator!
We need a records
managem...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
The CFO Watches Costs Increase
Actually that
requires a third
party product..
Easy! Just need
to custo...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
IT Services Can’t Support The
Flood Of New Requests
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Shared Understanding
Of Objectives
#SPFest @RHarbridgeConcept Courtesy of Andrew Jolly
1 2
3
4
5
6 7 8 9
10
Abundance Of Helpful Data
1. Area Map
2. Our Dire...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Identifying Our Objectives
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Abstract Objectives (Platitudes)
These are not good objectives!
#SPFest @RHarbridge
In Canada we learn
this right after
hockey appreciation
in grade school.
#SPFest @RHarbridge
#SPFest @RHarbridge
#SPFest @RHarbridge
We would like to automate and improve our
‘paper based’ ‘legal’ ‘contract mngmt’’
‘contract rview’ pro...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Legal Contract Solutions
• Contract Review Workflow
• Request Contract Review Form
• Integration with ...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Prioritizing Objectives Requires
Understanding Value And Difficulty
#SPFest @RHarbridge
The Simplest Prioritization
Formula Ever…
Estimated Value
Estimated Difficulty
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Prioritization Example
 I have a difficult solution. It’s an 8 in difficulty (out of 10).
 I have an...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Prioritize and Plan S.M.A.R.T. Objectives
#SPFest @RHarbridge
The Right Approach
To Achieving Objectives
#SPFest @RHarbridge
What is the best approach to use
when working with SharePoint?
#SPFest @RHarbridge
ITERATIVE
APPROACH
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Why Iterative?
 SharePoint is a very large platform.
 It takes time to understand SharePoint.
 Shar...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
How people think it works…
Image from Paul Culmsee
#SPFest @RHarbridge
How it really works…
Image from Paul Culmsee
#SPFest @RHarbridge
SharePoint is not a Silver Bullet…
SharePoint is not a Silver Bullet at NothingButSharePoint.com
#SPFest @RHarbridge
 Utilized by Business Users to develop and implement business solutions that use
technology without I...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Foundation
Standard
Enterprise
SharePoint has Multiple Options
2007
2010
Online
On Site
#SPFest @RHarbridge
It’s Big Ecosystem
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Implemented Legal
Contracts Solution!
Have we achieved our objective?
Implemented SharePoint!
#SPFest @RHarbridge
A Lesson Courtesy Of The Mars Rover
Primary among the mission's scientific
goals is to search for and ...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Have We Achieved Our Goal?
Concept Courtesy of Andrew Jolly
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Have We Achieved Our Goal?
Concept Courtesy of Andrew Jolly
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Have We Achieved Our Goal?
Concept Courtesy of Andrew Jolly
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Have We Achieved Our Goal?
Concept Courtesy of Andrew Jolly
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Have We Achieved Our Goal?
Concept Courtesy of Andrew Jolly
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Launch Minded People Think…
Pre
Launch
Launch
Don’t blow up!
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Pre
Launch
Launch Flight Landing
Post Launch People Think…
Have we
succeeded in
gaining
adoption?
Have...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Back to our friend the Mars Rover…
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Have We Achieved Our Goal?
Concept Courtesy of Andrew Jolly
Achieved
Primary
Objective
#SPFest @RHarbridge
How Important Was Launch?
Concept Courtesy of Andrew Jolly
Launch
How many people understood
how much ...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Requirements
Definition and Mapping
#SPFest @RHarbridge
What makes something a requirement?
#SPFest @RHarbridge
We can do that for $10
#SPFest @RHarbridge
We can do that for
$1 Million
#SPFest @RHarbridge
The Power Of Zero $$ Change Orders
#SPFest @RHarbridge
SharePoint chicken & egg problem
#SPFest @RHarbridge
DON’T demo
SharePoint
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Understand Their Workload & Identify
Challenges
#SPFest @RHarbridge
#SPFest @RHarbridge
OK to demo
SharePoint
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Simple Scenarios Are Your Best Friend
#SPFest @RHarbridge
#SPFest @RHarbridge
#SPFest @RHarbridge
When To Demo SharePoint
 When you need help scoping requirements and
managing expectations.
 When yo...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
How do you scale this?
Send a questionnaire/survey before/after…
You have three primary goals:
• Get p...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Visualizing and Communicating
IA Concepts
#SPFest @RHarbridge
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Adapted from the “pea
soup” story by Serge
Tremblay
#SPFest @RHarbridge
#SPFest @RHarbridge
#SPFest @RHarbridge
What is our Base Metaphor
for files?
#SPFest @RHarbridge
What if we saw this?
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Better…
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Solve with folders
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Hire an intern
#SPFest @RHarbridge
#SPFest @RHarbridge
This is metadata!
#SPFest @RHarbridge
The #1 rule of SharePoint?
Never use
folders
Except when it makes
sense
ever
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Folders for Security
Permissions assigned
per folder
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Customer Type
• Lab
• Hospital
• Clinic
• Mobile
Sector
• Private
• Public
Size
• Large
• Medium
• Sma...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Adding Metadata (when uploading)
#SPFest @RHarbridge
A SharePoint Simulation
#SPFest @RHarbridge
What are content types?
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Name _________
Emp. # _________
Date _________
Dates Requested:
From __________
To: __________
Manager...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Both Content Types in One Library
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Content Types
for:
Workflo
w,
Policy,Security
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Tools For The
Information Architect
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Mind Mapping Demonstration
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Navigation
workshops
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Navigational Map
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Navigation Systems
• Global navigation
• Local navigation
• Breadcrumbs/Up One Level Control
• Context...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
IBIS mapping demonstration
http://www.cognexus.org/
#SPFest @RHarbridge
What is Card Sorting?
#SPFest @RHarbridge
“Card sorting is a great, reliable,
inexpensive method for finding
patterns in how users would expect
...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Why use Card Sorting?
• Card sorting can help you identify trends
– Do the users want to see the infor...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Types of Card Sorting
• Open Card Sorting
– Participants are given cards showing site content
with no ...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Open card sorting process
Gerbil
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Results
Gerbil
#SPFest @RHarbridge
But not always what you expect
Ford
Gerbil
#SPFest @RHarbridge
But not always what you expect
Ford
Gerbil
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Analysis
http://www.boxesandarrows.com/view/analyzing_card_sort_results_with_a_
spreadsheet_template
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Advantages of Card Sorting
• Simple
• Cheap
• Quick to execute
• Established
• Involves users
• Provid...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Disadvantages of Sorting
• Does not consider users’ tasks
• Results may vary
• Analysis can be time co...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Document inventory workshops
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Analyze Existing Content
• What type of content is it?
• How is the content organized
today?
• What is...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
#SPFest @RHarbridge
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Use Survey Tools!
Compiling results from 20 to 50
participants using excel
sheets/hand outs can be pai...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
The Inventory Worksheet
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Build Mind Map (based on inventory worksheet)
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Wireframing, and
Process Mapping
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Wireframing Workshops
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Balsamiq
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Common Intranet Components
Component Name Purpose
Message from the President/Owner/Founder Informative...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Balsamiq DEMO
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Business Process Workshops
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Visio 2010 Demo
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Common Intranet Processes
• Absence Reporting and Vacation Scheduling
• Expense Reimbursement
• Equipm...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Roadmap
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Questions? Ideas? Feedback? Contact me:
 Twitter: @RHarbridge
 Blog: http://www.RHarbridge.com
 Ema...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Making
Information Architecture
Decisions
#SPFest @RHarbridge
The
Importance
of Making
Good
Information
Architecture
Decisions
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Governance and IA?
Home Page
Functional Areas
Department Site –
“Public”
Department Team Site – “Priva...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Recommended Approach
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Incorporate Feedback Planning
Couldn’t Find What You Were Looking For?
Let Us Know (On Search Pages)
D...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
SharePoint Containment Hierarchy
Documents, Items and Pages
Folders and Document Sets
Libraries and Li...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
SharePoint Containment Hierarchy
Metadata
Item
Documents, Events, Pages, Custom Item, Image, etc.
Fold...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Site Collection or Site (Subsite)?
OR
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Site Collection
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Site Collection
#SPFest @RHarbridge
When To Use A Site Collection
#SPFest @RHarbridge
When To Use A Site Collection
#SPFest @RHarbridge
When To Use A Site Collection
#SPFest @RHarbridge
When To Use A Site Collection
#SPFest @RHarbridge
When To Use A Site Collection
#SPFest @RHarbridge
When To Use A Site Collection
#SPFest @RHarbridge
When To Use A Site Collection
Site Collection 1 Site Collection 2
Webparts &
Aggregation
Webparts &
Ag...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
When To Use A Site Collection
Group A
Group B
Group C
Collection Admin A
Collection Admin B
Group Y
Gr...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Purpose of a List?
• To Replace Excel
Spreadsheets
• To Track Complex Input
From Multiple People
• To ...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
One List or Multiple Lists?
OR
#SPFest @RHarbridge
When To Use a Single List
• You want to simplify viewing the same set of
items.
(When dispersed across...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
When To Use Multiple Lists
• You don’t expect people to need summaries of
the items together.
(When di...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Advanced Uses Of Lists
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Calendar or Calendar View?
​Capabilities Calendar list Calendar view​
​​Supports direct creation and e...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
One Library or Multiple Libraries?
OR
#SPFest @RHarbridge
When To Use a Single Library
• You want to simplify viewing the same set of
documents.
(When dispersed...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
When To Use Multiple Libraries
• You don’t expect people to need summaries of
the documents together.
...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
What Can You Do With A Document?
New/Upload
New Document
Upload Document
Upload Multiple Documents
New...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Require Check Out or Don’t?
OR
#SPFest @RHarbridge
How do we do it?
• Library tab
• Library settings
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Require Check Out?
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Require Check Out?
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Require Check Out?
Not Enabled By Default
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Require Check Out?
When enabled bulk uploading
or explorer view additions are
checked out by default. ...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Require Check Out?
Work Around: Navigate to Manage
Content and Structure and then to the
library. Sele...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Require Check Out?
You cannot edit multiple
documents in datasheet view.
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Require Check Out?
Work Around: By turning the require
check out option off we can make edits in
the d...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Require Check Out?
Workflows and code must
check the file out before being
able to update it/it’s meta...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Require Check Out?
When required check out is
enabled ‘storing files to local
drafts’ is an enabled op...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Require Check Out?
Co-Authoring is disabled on
libraries where check out is
required.
#SPFest @RHarbridge
• Office 2007 and Office 2010 let’s the user know
it is being used by someone else.
• This eventually ...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Require Check Out?
• You do not need to co-author documents.
• You do not need to bulk update metadata...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
• You do need to co-author documents.
• You do need to bulk update metadata.
• There are few people up...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
List and Content Type Tip!
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Default Content Types and
Metadata Values
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Navigating with Metadata Tip!
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Navigating with Metadata, not Folders
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Set up with Library Settings
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Configure Setttings
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Filters the list
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Document Routing Tip!
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Content Organizer and Routing
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Configure the router
#SPFest @RHarbridge
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Configure settings
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Create Rules
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Create/Modify Rules
#SPFest @RHarbridge
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Use the Drop-off Library
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Add a document
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Enter Metadata
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Detour: 2010 Metadata
#SPFest @RHarbridge
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Back to Drop-off library
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Your document was moved
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Rules don’t apply…
#SPFest @RHarbridge
… it doesn’t get moved
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Folder or Metadata?
OR
#SPFest @RHarbridge
The #1 rule of SharePoint?
Never use
folders
Except when it makes
sense
ever
#SPFest @RHarbridge
What’s wrong with folders?
• Deep structures hard to
navigate
• Finding stuff is hard
• Figuring out w...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
What’s the alternative?
#SPFest @RHarbridge
What’s the alternative?
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Metadata = No more folders
• Filtering
• Views
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Really? No more folders? Ever?
• What situations would you use folders?
• Subdivide large libraries/li...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Downsides of Metadata
• No free lunch (there is pain here)
• Awful architectural choices to make
– Mul...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Folders for easy permissions
• Create folder
• Set permissions
• Create view
without folders
• Easy fo...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Folders and Default Values
#SPFest @RHarbridge
#SPFest @RHarbridge
The Sales document library
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Drill down into Military folder
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Drill down into Air-to-Ground
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Add a new document here
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Note: Some metadata prefilled
#SPFest @RHarbridge
How did we do that?
• Library tab
• Library settings
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Column default value settings
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Select a folder and set defaults
• Note folder inheritance
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Set the default value
#SPFest @RHarbridge
in SharePoint 2010
• Managed Metadata Service
• Share Metadata across site collections
• Multilingual ...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Term Store Management
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Adding Terms
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Turn off “Available for Tagging”
• Add sub elements: Proposal, Quote, Invoice
• Leave “Available for T...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Term Store Manager
• Painful & Slow
• Needs a better way
• I created a ‘toy’ to try out some ideas
• h...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
#SPFest @RHarbridge
CSV file for Import to Term Store
#SPFest @RHarbridge
To Sum Up…
• SharePoint 2007
– Folders BAAAAD!
– Never use them
– Except when the situation warrants
•...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Folder or Document Set?
OR
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Folders vs. Document Sets
Document Sets vs Folders
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Document Sets
Document Sets vs Folders
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Folders and Default Values
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Folders vs. Document Sets
Document Sets vs Folders
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Folders vs. Document Sets
Document Sets vs Folders
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Folders vs. Document Sets
Document Sets vs Folders
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Folders vs. Document Sets
Document Sets vs Folders
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Folders vs. Document Sets
Document Sets vs Folders
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Folders vs. Document Sets
Document
Library
Document
Folder
Document
Document
Folder Folder Document
Do...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Sites vs Pages?
• See this great whitepaper by Susan Hanley
and Scott Jamison
http://www.microsoft.com...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Information Architecture
Tips and Tricks
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Make it easier to work with
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Make it easier to work with
Powerful Columns You Probably Didn’t Know About
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Make it easier to work with
Why Leveraging SharePoint Blog Features for News is a Great Idea
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Choice vs Lookup Column
• Susan Hanley – At it again!
http://cloud.snappages.com/b8898dc2c08e13
7d0344...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Time Challenges
in SharePoint Projects
#SPFest @RHarbridge
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Giving Estimates
Two Simple Tricks For Making Better Estimates
Never Give a Single Number
6 Hours!
At ...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Always Give Ranged Estimates
Two Simple Tricks For Making Better Estimates
Ranged Estimates Help Commu...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Are You Confident In That Range?
Two Simple Tricks For Making Better Estimates
2-8
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Are You Confident In That Range?
Two Simple Tricks For Making Better Estimates
ORWithin Range
Actual R...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Are You Confident In That Range?
Two Simple Tricks For Making Better Estimates
ORWithin Range
Actual R...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Are You Confident In That Range?
Two Simple Tricks For Making Better Estimates
ORWithin Range
Actual R...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Give 90% Confident Ranged Estimates
Two Simple Tricks For Making Better Estimates
2-8 Hours!
Within Ra...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Visualizing Timelines
An easy way to create shared
understanding of the impact
estimates make on proje...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Visualizing Existing Timelines
A great way to take existing
project timelines and set
stakeholder expe...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
IBIS Dialog Mapping
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Productivity Hub
#SPFest @RHarbridge
IUseSharePoint
Download and install the ‘lunch’ and learn module - an interesting idea.
#SPFest @RHarbridge
SharePoint Permissions
#SPFest @RHarbridge
AD Groups or SharePoint Groups?
OR
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Advantages Disadvantages
SharePoint
Group
• Not reliant on AD (if your AD is
a mess)
• Distributed own...
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Item Level
Permissions
#SPFest @RHarbridge
“Item Level”
Permissions
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Web Level
Permissions
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Targeted
Code
New in SharePoint 2010
SPRoleAssignmentCollection.AddToCurrentScopeOnly
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Do you have a Taxonomy Strategy?
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Do you have a Support Strategy?
SharePoint
Standards
Online
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Do you have a Staffing Strategy?
Building A
SharePoint
Team
#SPFest @RHarbridge
Questions? Ideas? Feedback? Contact me:
 Twitter: @RHarbridge
 Blog: http://www.RHarbridge.com
 Ema...
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SharePoint Fest Denver - Practical Tools and Techniques for the SharePoint Business Analyst and Information Architect

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  • My dedication to you before I begin. By the end of this you will have gained 3 things. It might be new knowledge, it might be a new method but you MUST gain 3 things by the end. If you don’t my first challenge to you is to stalk me, hunt me down and make sure you get 3 things from me. Because I owe you 3 things! This is meant to help you. 
  • “When you don’t know where you are going any road will get you there.” – Lewis Carroll
  • You take the estimated value and divide that by the estimated level of difficulty then times (*) it by 100 to get the percentage of ROI.
  • Speak to Owen Allen (creator of this map) for details on this
  • Just like in our IT projects it wasn’t really one launch due to the complexity. It was multiple launches to get us on the right trajectory towards our goal/objectives.
  • If you think dealing with Attorneys and users is a challenge imagine having to plan for hard Martian soil, extreme temperatures and storms.
  • Even after it had landed it had to ‘travel’ away from the landing site in order to start taking samples/getting a better understanding of the area.
  • Even after reaching our destination there is still the hard work of gathering the data. Then the hard work of verifying and validating the data.
  • Look at launch and the initial 3 months worth of missions compares to the number they actually had!
  • It’s critical to understand the importance of not just launch, but the mini launches that adjust our trajectory, and the travel and importance of communication, and finally the landing and it’s importance.
  • Requirements is NOT the right word to use here (but you have to because your clients and stakeholders expect it).
    (Sue Hanley first pointed this out to me.)

  • Because I said so, and I’m the customer.
    If you don’t include my requirement, I’ll shoot!
    One of my biggest jobs as a SharePoint BA is to manage this desire.
    My three rules of SharePoint: Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity
  • What if we say: We can do that for $10.
    Client says: Go for it!
  • What if we say: We can do that… for $1 Million.
    Client says: Wait a sec – maybe we can think of some alternatives
    (Hey! Maybe it’s no longer a ‘requirement’)
  • What would you like SharePoint to do?
    Well, what can it do?
    Tons! Let me show you
    What do I need that for?
    Well, it depends… what do you want it for?
    Well, it LOOKS cool – sure: I want it.
  • But First: DO NOT DEMO SharePoint
    Confuses people
    Sets unreasonable expectations
  • Now, it’s ok to build a demo: Use their language, colors, logo
    Show ‘day in the life’ type scenario
  • What would you like SharePoint to do?
    Well, what can it do?
    Tons! Let me show you
    What do I need that for?
    Well, it depends… what do you want it for?
    Well, it LOOKS cool – sure: I want it.
  • How do you sort CD’s
    Artist?
    Title?
    Year?
    Genre?
    Colour?

    You have to decide up-front – and stick to it –because the objects are physical
  • What if the store was full of unlabeled tin cans?
    You would need to open every can to see if had what you wanted

    (Tin can example originally suggested by Serge Tremblay)
  • Now we don’t need to open each can, but they are all in a jumble and you have to pick up each can to check if has what you want.
  • Items are grouped by area (canned fruit, canned sauce, canned vegetables)
    Signs point you to the correct area so that you can quickly find what you need.
    BUT: Because the objects are physical, you need to pick a method and stick to it
  • This uses the base metaphor that we live with every day.
    The concept of a “file” and a “file folder” as a way of storing digital data is a metaphor taken from the world of paper management
    It has become so ingrained, that we think of it as natural, but it’s not: It was invented in 1983 by Apple (wikipedia)
  • All your files are stored in one folder and their names are completely meaningless
    This is like the unlabeled cans: You have to open each file to see what it contains
  • You have a bit of a better situation
    The naming convention lets you find the file you need (but there’s no way to sort by year)
    Rely on users to follow the naming convention (religiously)
  • A ha!
    Now we’re in great shape. We’re like the supermarket
    Structured and Labelled
    BUT...
  • ... then, you hire a summer intern
    Who doesn’t know the folder hierarchy and makes up their own
  • Findability is challenging
    Putability is the real problem
    This is Bill English’s word for knowing where to save a document
    What if we could make putability easier while also improving findability?
    This is the promise of metadata
  • So, let’s create an alternative structure that is logically equivalent, but that makes putability much easier while preserving findability
    By the way: One way to start to figure out an organization’s metadata is to look at the folder names.
    You will probably not want to simply copy this, but it can be a good guide/starting point
  • Never, ever, use folders!
    Except when it makes sense to do so.

    [ANIMATED]


  • [ANIMATED]
  • Is this too many to ask for?
    Do we force users to answer all these questions/enter all this data?
  • Instead of confusing people with the SharePoint interface, I use a familiar tool: Excel
    Using some simple macros, I am able to illustrate the power of filters and views.
    There’s no free lunch however: People now have to enter metadata.
    We can simplify this by defaulting values like “Date” to today and “Year” to current year.
    We can leverage content types as well
  • Think of them as different forms with slots to fill in.
    Two documents may have overlapping slots (or, metadata).
    It may make sense to store these two types of docs in the same library (HR Requests), but use content types to drive workflow, policy and prompt users only for the metadata that applies.

    [ANIMATED]


  • [ANIMATED]
  • MindManager (from MindJet) is a tool that has changed the way I work. Here is a quick demo of how it works.
  • Using Mind Maps for navigational design makes this process MUCH faster and more efficient.
  • A technique to get input or feedback from users
    You may have great ideas of how to organize you intranet, but you users may have different ideas
    Donna Spencer says: “Card sorting is a great, reliable, inexpensive method for finding patterns in how users would expect to find content or functionality.”
  • The analysis can be useful, but it is the process of watching people do the sorts that helps provide the real value
  • First, I do a presentation about what metadata is to a collection of groups
    Give them homework
    Then, bring them back to build taxonomy:
    This needs to be done with just one group at a time
  • Using mind-mapping tools to build the taxonomy from the homework
    I use MindJet MindManager – and I like and highly recommend it.
    There are other tools that are less expensive.
  • What is wireframing?
    Creating page mockups that show the function and structure of the page without the fonts/colors/images, etc
  • This tool called ‘Balsamiq’ makes it extremely simple and fast to make wireframes.
    They look cartoonish, but that makes it easy to focus on what’s important (not color, font, etc.)
  • Even without building an automated workflow, it’s essential to understand the business process of your customers.
    Use BizAgi (which is free to download) or Visio 2010 to map these processes.
  • If you are lucky, you can take the results of these workshops and activities and create a roadmap for a phased, rational approach to SharePoint deployment. Push HARD to do this step.
    Summarize workshop results
    Build Gap Analysis
    Identify dependencies
    Lay out a timeline (not a project plan at this point)
  • A lot of this can seem daunting and I know one of the hardest things is figuring out how to do some of the things I have shown today. If you are interested in further training or assistance please let me know. Based on the number of people who are interested and the areas of interest we can schedule further training sessions to help everyone better use the SharePoint portal.

    It's our commitment to you that we will continue to hear your feedback and identify issues. I encourage you to give us feedback during the coming months, and we will continue to deliver more and more examples, answers, and guidance to help you be successful with your application of SharePoint.

    Thank You for Reading/Listening
  • The Controlled Intranet If your goals are to create an environment that nurtures the sharing of knowledge and intellectual property (IP), there are two critical success factors that must be adhered to.
    We must make the addition of knowledge in the solution as simple as possible. This is accomplished by:
    Thoroughly understanding how our Information Workers perform their daily job duties.
    Craft a solution that simplifies these duties by automating operational business processes.
    Implement your Intranet in such a manner as to ease where this knowledge is stored.
    Provide a solution that makes locating information quick and simple so our Information Workers can make better, informed business decisions. We accomplish this by:
    Providing topical, functional and task-based site structures that aggregate knowledge in a manner making it easy to locate based on a need.
    Architect knowledge in such a manner as to provide “very” relevant search results.
    The only way for you to successfully deliver a solution that adheres to these two critical success factors is to architect your corporate knowledge (information) in a manner that lends itself to aggregation and search. And, the only way to do that is through a detailed and carefully thought-out taxonomy. Simply tossing information into lists and libraries will only result in yet another repository that is similar to a file share. For an organization to successfully implement a controlled environment that improves operational efficiencies requires governance. The term governance itself implies rules, policies and best practices for the flow of information through an organization.


    Collab areas:
    It is also in the collaboration environments that you will find the greatest number of sites. Make sure you set the appropriate expectations (communicate, communicate, and communicate):
    Information in these sites is less structured; which means you will typically see less relevant search results.
    This area can quickly grow to thousands of sites. Don’t let 5,000, 10,000 or even 30,000 sites scare you; simply make sure you have the appropriate infrastructure to support it.
    Govern the amount of information that can be stored on each site; configure quotas.
    Govern the length of time a site may remain inactive.
    Provide a means of archival.


    Do Collaboration Sites Ever Become Controlled? Absolutely! You may find that a team creates a secure collaboration environment to start a community of practice. Over time, information may become key to driving success in the organization. In such a situation, the team may ask to convert the site to a more structured environment so its content is available to everyone in the organization.
    There are many ways of accomplishing this task. The easiest is to leave the site intact, and move it through your internal architecture/design processes. These processes will force some level of structure, including taxonomy; which will make the information available for aggregation and search (even constrained search). You can then update your search configuration to include its content in a manner that best suits your organizational information needs. Another approach would be to provide a controlled means of moving the site and content to the Controlled Intranet Site Collection.
  • To Impose Specific Storage Quotas With SharePoint Site Collections you can define specific storage quotas and email warnings to notify users when they are approaching a defined threshold on their site collection storage.
    To Impose Specific Sandbox Quotas
    With a SharePoint Site Collection you can define the maximum number of points sandbox solutions can use per day. Additionally you can also configure an email warning when storage exceeds a certain number of points.
  • For Search Separation
    For Workflow Separation
  • So Your Site Collection Does Not Have The Same Active (or Inactive) Site Collection Features There are many times when this comes in handy. In SharePoint 2010 there are quite a few Site Collection level features you may not want active on specific site collections.
    Site collection features that are not active on other site collections (for example, the Publishing Infrastructure feature)
  • For Search Separation
    For Workflow Separation

    So Your Site Collection Does Not Have The Same Active (or Inactive) Site Collection Features There are many times when this comes in handy. In SharePoint 2010 there are quite a few Site Collection level features you may not want active on specific site collections.
    Site collection features that are not active on other site collections (for example, the Publishing Infrastructure feature)

    To Have a Separate Help Library to Store Custom Help
  • Disadvantages of Using Site Collections All out-of-the-box Web Parts understand and work well within the boundaries of a Site Collection. None of them, including the significantly used Content Query Web Part, will cross Site Collection boundaries. Thus, the aggregation of information across Site Collection boundaries is not possible using out-of-the-box Web Parts.

    You need to consider this when determining how you will split your information across Site Collections. Any situation that requires you to aggregate and display information across Site Collection boundaries will require a custom development effort or the purchase of a 3rd party Web Part.

    Your branding and content publishing customization efforts will also have to be duplicated. Currently, all master pages, page layouts, and CSS files, common publishing images and reusable content is bound to a Site Collection.
  • For Security Management Benefits: Every site collection creates a security boundary between one collection of sites and another collection of sites. Each site collection has its own collection of SharePoint groups and ACL references.

    You cannot see a complete list of Users who have permissions to the site or Object
    Users are members of more than one AD Group
    Work backwards to figure out permissions
    2010 – 1000 objects in an ACL, 5000 Objects per SharePoint Group
    The more ACLs you have, the more ACLs you have to manage
    Know the Software Boundaries and Capacity limits http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc262787.aspx


    For Privacy or Management Benefits and Different Site Collection Administrators Each site collection has a role of “Site Collection Administrator” and a person or more assigned to that role. There are times when either for privacy/confidentiality reasons you cannot have a specific site collection administrator with the rights to see that sites content, or where you have different people that should be assigned to manage that collection of sites. The second is an extremely common scenario in large enterprise organizations where there is a need to distribute the technical ownership of site collection administration.
  • Your group needs to see summary information about the list items or different views of the same set of items. For example, a manager may want to see the progress on all technical issues for an organization or see all the issues that were filed within the same time period.
    People want to browse or search for the issues in the same location on a site.
    You want to apply the same settings to the list items, such as tracking versions or requiring approval.
    The groups working on the list share similar characteristics, such as the same levels of permission. Unique permission can be applied to specific list items, but if the levels of permission vary greatly, consider multiple lists.
    You want to analyze information about the list or receive consolidated updates for the list. You can receive alerts when the list items are changed or see the changes to a list by using RSS technology. RSS feeds enable members of your workgroup to see a consolidated list of information that has changed.
  • You don't expect people to need summaries of the items together.
    The groups of people working with the information are distinct and have different permission levels.
    You need to apply different settings, such as versioning or approval, to multiple sets of items.
    You do not need to analyze the items together or receive consolidated updates about the list.
  • Your group needs to see summary information about, or different views of, the same set of files. For example, a manager may want to see all files grouped by department or by due date.
    People want to search for the files in the same location on a site.
    You want to apply the same settings to files, such as tracking versions of files or requiring approval.
    The groups that are working with the library share similar characteristics, such as the same levels of permission.
    You want to analyze information about the files in a spreadsheet, or to receive consolidated updates about the files.
  • The types of files that you want to store and manage are distinct, and you don't expect people to frequently view summaries of the files or to search the files together.
    The groups of people who are using the files are distinct and have distinctly different permission levels.
    You need to apply different settings, such as versioning or approval, to different sets of files.
    You do not need to analyze the files together or receive consolidated updates about the files.
    You want to provide different sets of options for creating new files, or you want the options on the New menu of a library to appear in a different order.
  • You can set the default content type of a library – and set that content type’s default values so that any item added to that library will automatically have metadata associated with it.
  • You can set the default content type of a library – and set that content type’s default values so that any item added to that library will automatically have metadata associated with it.
  • You can set the default content type of a library – and set that content type’s default values so that any item added to that library will automatically have metadata associated with it.
  • You can set the default content type of a library – and set that content type’s default values so that any item added to that library will automatically have metadata associated with it.
  • You can set the default content type of a library – and set that content type’s default values so that any item added to that library will automatically have metadata associated with it.
  • You can set the default content type of a library – and set that content type’s default values so that any item added to that library will automatically have metadata associated with it.
  • You can set the default content type of a library – and set that content type’s default values so that any item added to that library will automatically have metadata associated with it.
  • Your group needs to see summary information about, or different views of, the same set of files. For example, a manager may want to see all files grouped by department or by due date.
    People want to search for the files in the same location on a site.
    You want to apply the same settings to files, such as tracking versions of files or requiring approval.
    The groups that are working with the library share similar characteristics, such as the same levels of permission.
    You want to analyze information about the files in a spreadsheet, or to receive consolidated updates about the files.
  • The types of files that you want to store and manage are distinct, and you don't expect people to frequently view summaries of the files or to search the files together.
    The groups of people who are using the files are distinct and have distinctly different permission levels.
    You need to apply different settings, such as versioning or approval, to different sets of files.
    You do not need to analyze the files together or receive consolidated updates about the files.
    You want to provide different sets of options for creating new files, or you want the options on the New menu of a library to appear in a different order.
  • You can set the default content type of a library – and set that content type’s default values so that any item added to that library will automatically have metadata associated with it.
  • Use if you have clear organizing requirements
    Deploy a good Search Architecture  Search Based Navigation

    Don’t forget to turn on the Content Organizer Feature – on the Target Site too!
    Don’t forget to implement Content Types in the Target Libraries
    Teach the users!
  • Never, ever, use folders!
    Except when it makes sense to do so.

    [ANIMATED]
  • Ease of use for users: File Open/Save – reduce metadata load
  • Managed Metadata Services
    Term Store
    Hierarchical collection of terms
    Multilingual
    Synonyms


    LimitMaximum valueLimit typeNotesMaximum number of levels of nested terms in a term store
    7
    Supported
    Terms in a term set can be represented hierarchically.  A term set can have up to seven levels of terms (a parent term, and six levels of nesting below it.)
    Maximum number of term sets in a term store
    1000
    Supported
    You can have up to 1000 term sets in a term store.
    Maximum number of terms in a term set
    30,000
    Supported
    30,000 is the maximum number of terms in a term set.
    Note:
    Additional labels for the same term, such as synonyms and translations, do not count as separate terms.
    Total number of items in a term store
    1,000,000
    Supported
    An item is either a term or a term set. The sum of the number of terms and term sets cannot exceed 1,000,000. Additional labels for the same term, such as synonyms and translations, do not count as separate terms.
    Note:
    You cannot have both the maximum number of term sets and the maximum number of terms simultaneously in a term store.
  • Webpage (instead of just a folder name and possible metadata)
  • Synchronization of metadata
    The ability to synchronize metadata allows users to change metadata on multiple items at once within a collection of content. Frequently users will want to do a bulk change of metadata stored within a folder. The most common way to achieve this using Folders is by utilizing the Datasheet View for document libraries, which allows users to bulk change properties quickly. However, this can be error prone and has limitations, such as the inability to change Managed Metadata fields.
    In contrast, Document Sets allow the ability to configure a column as a Shared Column. Shared Columns then share metadata across the entire Document Set. By changing the column value at the document set, all content contained within the Document Set will be updated with the new value without the user manually having to change each individual document. Another advantage is that all columns types are supported, so users can also easily change Managed Metadata columns for all content as well.
  • Running workflows on multiple items with SharePoint Designer
    Running workflows on multiple items is another commonly asked for requirement in many organizations. The ability to send multiple items through an approval process is something that commonly appears on a list of requirements when organizations are implementing SharePoint.
    With folders there is really no other option than to manually start an Approval process on each item. Unfortunately even though you can now select multiple items to perform actions on within Lists and Libraries, you cannot do this with workflows. If you have ten documents that you need to send through an Approval process, then it's a rather laborious process. Of course you can create custom workflows in .NET code to solve this issue and it's a good example of where the new Site Workflow type may be used. However, if we are limiting ourselves to out-of-the-box or SharePoint Designer declarative workflows then we are out of luck.
    With Document Sets we have new Workflow Actions available in SharePoint Designer 2010. This means that we can indeed send an entire Document Set through an Approval Process. Since a Document Set includes multiple documents, we are in effect sending multiple items through an approval process
  • Provisioning of default content
    The ability to create a template and have this reused when a user is creating a document is commonly used in SharePoint. The power of Content Types within the platform can be harnessed very effectively to create these templates and deploy them across multiple sites. However, often we don't require just a single document to be created, but rather a collection of documents to be provisioned. For example consider a project submission pack or a RFP Response that consists of multiple documents.
    In an ideal world, a user would be able to create collections of documents quickly and easily. If using the folder approach, you can only create single documents, one at a time. So if a user wanted to create a project submission pack then they would create the folder that would house these documents, and then create each individual Content Type one at a time. This is obviously a cumbersome approach.
    In contrast Document Sets allow us to provision default content when the Document Set is created. So if we create a RFP Response Document Set we can choose to have default content created when a user creates the Document Set:
  • Folders can have folders under them etc. Doc sets cant.
  • The first tip I will give is to never ever give a single number. As an example when asked how long it will take to make ‘report A’ let the requester know a range that you feel comfortable with. Why a range? Realistically in a quick situation like that if you don’t give a range it won’t indicate how uncertain you are about the estimate.
    If you were thinking about the request and felt like the task would take somewhere between 2-8 hours then communicating only a single value guess such as ’6 hours’ can be misleading as it doesn’t include any information about how confident you are.
  • So the first thing we need to agree on is that quickly estimating a ‘single number’ (without math/careful consideration) typically leads to poor results in both setting the right expectation and being accurate.
  • Now onto the difficulties of even coming up with a range of possibilities. One of the hardest parts of estimating is coming up with a range you feel really confident in.
    Basically when you give an estimate you should give a range that you feel 90% confident that the real value will fall within that range (90% is the suggested optimal confidence level due to the effort involved in getting more than 90%).
    You don’t have to be perfect but you have to feel willing to bet on it.
    In other words if you consider giving a range of 2-8 hours on a task as an estimate you should confirm that you are actually 90% confident that the total time will fall between that range. There is a trick (one of many) that Douglas mentions in his book that is easy to remember and use for testing whether you are actually close to 90% confident about an estimate.
    Imagine that you win $2000 in one of two ways:
    A) You will win $2000 if the true time it takes turns out to be between the upper and lower bounds you provided. If not then you win nothing.
    B) You draw a M&M at random from a bag of 9 red M&M’s and 1 blue M&M. If the M&M is red you win $2000. If it is blue you win nothing.
    Which option would you take? If you choose B) (which statistically most people do) then it means you might not be 90% confident but actually less confident (say 80%, 60% etc). If you choose A) it’s also not really what we want because it means you are probably over confident (especially if you felt strongly geared toward A). So you adjust the bounds (upper and lower) until you find a place where you feel indifferent between option A) and B) – that is ‘probably’ your 90% confidence level for this estimate.
    It’s not as complicated (or in some ways as effective) as many other methods you can use to calibrate how confident you are about your estimates but it works and is easy to remember and start implementing immediately.
  • Now onto the difficulties of even coming up with a range of possibilities. One of the hardest parts of estimating is coming up with a range you feel really confident in.
    Basically when you give an estimate you should give a range that you feel 90% confident that the real value will fall within that range (90% is the suggested optimal confidence level due to the effort involved in getting more than 90%).
    You don’t have to be perfect but you have to feel willing to bet on it.
    In other words if you consider giving a range of 2-8 hours on a task as an estimate you should confirm that you are actually 90% confident that the total time will fall between that range. There is a trick (one of many) that Douglas mentions in his book that is easy to remember and use for testing whether you are actually close to 90% confident about an estimate.
    Imagine that you win $2000 in one of two ways:
    A) You will win $2000 if the true time it takes turns out to be between the upper and lower bounds you provided. If not then you win nothing.
    B) You draw a M&M at random from a bag of 9 red M&M’s and 1 blue M&M. If the M&M is red you win $2000. If it is blue you win nothing.
    Which option would you take? If you choose B) (which statistically most people do) then it means you might not be 90% confident but actually less confident (say 80%, 60% etc). If you choose A) it’s also not really what we want because it means you are probably over confident (especially if you felt strongly geared toward A). So you adjust the bounds (upper and lower) until you find a place where you feel indifferent between option A) and B) – that is ‘probably’ your 90% confidence level for this estimate.
    It’s not as complicated (or in some ways as effective) as many other methods you can use to calibrate how confident you are about your estimates but it works and is easy to remember and start implementing immediately.
  • Now onto the difficulties of even coming up with a range of possibilities. One of the hardest parts of estimating is coming up with a range you feel really confident in.
    Basically when you give an estimate you should give a range that you feel 90% confident that the real value will fall within that range (90% is the suggested optimal confidence level due to the effort involved in getting more than 90%).
    You don’t have to be perfect but you have to feel willing to bet on it.
    In other words if you consider giving a range of 2-8 hours on a task as an estimate you should confirm that you are actually 90% confident that the total time will fall between that range. There is a trick (one of many) that Douglas mentions in his book that is easy to remember and use for testing whether you are actually close to 90% confident about an estimate.
    Imagine that you win $2000 in one of two ways:
    A) You will win $2000 if the true time it takes turns out to be between the upper and lower bounds you provided. If not then you win nothing.
    B) You draw a M&M at random from a bag of 9 red M&M’s and 1 blue M&M. If the M&M is red you win $2000. If it is blue you win nothing.
    Which option would you take? If you choose B) (which statistically most people do) then it means you might not be 90% confident but actually less confident (say 80%, 60% etc). If you choose A) it’s also not really what we want because it means you are probably over confident (especially if you felt strongly geared toward A). So you adjust the bounds (upper and lower) until you find a place where you feel indifferent between option A) and B) – that is ‘probably’ your 90% confidence level for this estimate.
    It’s not as complicated (or in some ways as effective) as many other methods you can use to calibrate how confident you are about your estimates but it works and is easy to remember and start implementing immediately.
  • Now onto the difficulties of even coming up with a range of possibilities. One of the hardest parts of estimating is coming up with a range you feel really confident in.
    Basically when you give an estimate you should give a range that you feel 90% confident that the real value will fall within that range (90% is the suggested optimal confidence level due to the effort involved in getting more than 90%).
    You don’t have to be perfect but you have to feel willing to bet on it.
    In other words if you consider giving a range of 2-8 hours on a task as an estimate you should confirm that you are actually 90% confident that the total time will fall between that range. There is a trick (one of many) that Douglas mentions in his book that is easy to remember and use for testing whether you are actually close to 90% confident about an estimate.
    Imagine that you win $2000 in one of two ways:
    A) You will win $2000 if the true time it takes turns out to be between the upper and lower bounds you provided. If not then you win nothing.
    B) You draw a M&M at random from a bag of 9 red M&M’s and 1 blue M&M. If the M&M is red you win $2000. If it is blue you win nothing.
    Which option would you take? If you choose B) (which statistically most people do) then it means you might not be 90% confident but actually less confident (say 80%, 60% etc). If you choose A) it’s also not really what we want because it means you are probably over confident (especially if you felt strongly geared toward A). So you adjust the bounds (upper and lower) until you find a place where you feel indifferent between option A) and B) – that is ‘probably’ your 90% confidence level for this estimate.
    It’s not as complicated (or in some ways as effective) as many other methods you can use to calibrate how confident you are about your estimates but it works and is easy to remember and start implementing immediately.
  • So the first thing we need to agree on is that quickly estimating a ‘single number’ (without math/careful consideration) typically leads to poor results in both setting the right expectation and being accurate.
  • more than 1000 security scopes (broken inheritance) leads to performance degradation.
    50k scopes per list/doc lib is a limit or - more than 50k unique permissions per list is a hard limit.

    The Practical Limit? 2000 users/groups given access

    5k users/ad groups per sharepoint group

    When you add a user or group to a unique ‘scope’ (broken permissions) it actually adds that user or group with ‘limited access’ to each scope in the hierarchy above the item…

    Best practice:
    Rely on group membership instead of indivudal user membership in the scopes. For example, if a single group can be used in place of 1,000 users, the scope will be 999 membership entries smaller for the scope and any of its parent scopes which will be updated with Limited Access rights for that single group instead of all 1,000 individual users with Limited Access rights. This additionally helps increase the speed of Limited Access rights push and ACL recalculation at the parent scope objects.

    Deep hierarchies also impact performance considerably. So try and avoid very deep hierarchies with unique permissions.

  • Note: We do not recommend that you use SharePoint groups to assign permissions to sites, because when a SharePoint group is used to assign permissions, a full crawl of the index occurs. Instead, we recommend Domain groups to be used.
  • We recommend that you use FGP for only those business cases for which it is required. FGP can be expensive in terms of both operational oversight and performance.

    If you must use fine-grained permissions, consider the following recommended practices:
    Ensure that you do not have too many items at the same level of hierarchy in the document libraries, because the time necessary to process items in the views increases.
  • You can avoid the use of FGP by doing the following:
    Break permission inheritance as infrequently as possible.
    Use groups based on directory membership to assign permissions.
    Assign permissions at the highest possible level. As part of this strategy, consider the following techniques:

    Use different document publish levels to control access. Before a document is published, the advanced permissions and versioning settings can be set for users who can only approve items in the document library.

    For non-document libraries (lists), use the ReadSecurity and WriteSecurity permission levels. When a list is created, the owners can set the Item-level permissions to either Read access or Create and Edit access.

  • Basically manage permissions by each SharePoint site uniquely (instead of at a fine grained level). So use the 3 built in groups or AD groups etc and set permissions at the web level.

    From another point of view, if you have a large list where you want to uniquely set permissions try having ‘more than one list’ in multiple webs to get around some of the performance impact involved (2k unique permissions per web as an example). It avoids a lot of the hierarchy performance hits we discussed.

    Of course even better is using multiple site collections, but for now we will keep it simple and say at a minimum an effective way would be doing it at the web level (or even list/library level before getting to the item level).
  • Use event handlers to control edit permission. You can have an event handler that registers an event using the SPEventReceiverType.ItemUpdating and SPEventReceiverType.ItemUpdated methods, and then use code to control whether the update should be allowed. This is extremely powerful, because you can make security decision based on any metadata of a list or item, without affecting the view rendering performance.

    Use AddToCurrentScopeOnly method to assign Limited Access membership within a SharePoint group. The key element in this principle is to redesign the architecture so that scope membership does not cause ACL recalculation at the parent document library and Web.

    This is mainly applicable if the cause of the excessive number of unique scopes was through an automated process such as an event handler or workflow that dynamically modified object permissions. The recommendation in this case is to make a code change to whatever process was creating the unique security scopes.
  • Do you have a site map that represents the current site structures?
    Does this clearly indicate recommended containment hierarchy?
    Do you have a site map that defines future site structures?
    Are you using Content Types?
    Are you using metadata to help make content easier to organize and find?
    Are you using site columns?
    Are you using and managing Term Sets?
    Do you have tagging guidelines?
    Are you managing keywords?
    Are you using and managing Site Directories?
    Do you have classifications based on type of use?
    Communications based (publishing) portal/sites/collections?
    Team based collaboration sites/collections?
    Application/services based sites/collections?
    Are you checking for dead links?
    How well is your site structured?
    Can people find what they are looking for?
  • What kind of SharePoint support do you currently provide?
    Do you provide help material such as Manuals, Course Guidebooks, Workbooks, How To, Tutorials, or Demonstrations?
    How do you train users on SharePoint?
    How do you currently provision your sites?
    How do you determine where each site should live?
    Who owns the site and who supports the site?
    How do you communicate new features, initiatives, or changes to SharePoint to your users?
    How many SharePoint support requests do you currently get?
    How are these categorized?
    How are these assigned and escalated?
    How many are effectively responded to?
    How many are closed with success?
    Do you leverage/contribute to an internal knowledgebase for SharePoint support?
    Do you have clearly defined SLAs for support and problem resolution?
    Do you offer face to face learning or unstructured/semi-structured environments for learning? (Lunch and learns, after hours discussions, communities etc)
  • While SharePoint internal environments support a ‘mobile’ friendly mode the same feature doesn’t work for anonymous users on public facing websites. In addition to this there is the challenge of much smaller resolutions which SharePoint has not been optimized for. Even the webpages developed within SharePoint are large and according to some experts ‘bloated’ with additional content that often is not applicable for anonymous users. There are workarounds for all of these issues (and more), but most require some level of customization or code. So while optimizing SharePoint sites for mobile and tablet devices is possible, it isn’t necessarily easy. What does Microsoft currently have to say about this? “Microsoft SharePoint 2010 supports several modern, standards based, XHTML 1.0 compliant browsers such as Internet Explorer 8, Firefox 3.6 and Safari 4.x as detailed in the “Plan browser support (SharePoint Server 2010)” on Microsoft TechNet. It explains in detail which features work and which do not across the browsers and is the most up to date browser support information. The mobile versions of Safari browser on the Apple iPhone OS (used by the iPhone and iPad) have not been tested by Microsoft, and there may be issues using them with SharePoint 2010.” There are quite a few documented issues (almost all of which relate to the mobile browser and the fact that SharePoint 2010 has not been designed to behave with all touch based interfaces) which are a good reason for concern when many businesses are seeing considerable growth and adoption of tablets. According to the JP Morgan Analyst Group “The tablet market is expected to grow to $35 billion by 2012”. Let me assure you that a big contributor to that growth will be enterprise customers who use SharePoint

    What is the mobile experience of your SharePoint site?
    Have you optimized the site for smaller resolutions?
    What mobile browsers do you support?
    Is your organization adopting tablet PCs (iPads)?
    What is the tablet experience of your SharePoint site?
    What support do you provide for remote workers?
    What are the offline and synchronization options your organization is providing?
    Is SharePoint available outside of the firewall for employees?
    When a user receives an email linking to a SharePoint document on their phone can they download that document?
    What is this mobile email and SharePoint experience like?
  • A lot of this can seem daunting and I know one of the hardest things is figuring out how to do some of the things I have shown today. If you are interested in further training or assistance please let me know. Based on the number of people who are interested and the areas of interest we can schedule further training sessions to help everyone better use the SharePoint portal.

    It's our commitment to you that we will continue to hear your feedback and identify issues. I encourage you to give us feedback during the coming months, and we will continue to deliver more and more examples, answers, and guidance to help you be successful with your application of SharePoint.

    Thank You for Reading/Listening
  • SharePoint Fest Denver - Practical Tools and Techniques for the SharePoint Business Analyst and Information Architect

    1. 1. #SPFest @RHarbridge Practical Tools and Techniques for the SharePoint Business Analyst & Information Architect #SPFest @RHarbridge Facilitated By: Richard Harbridge
    2. 2. #SPFest @RHarbridge Who am I? Boston Washington
    3. 3. #SPFest @RHarbridge SPTechCon The SharePoint Technology Conference SPTechCon The SharePoint Technology Conference
    4. 4. #SPFest @RHarbridge Special Mention… Ruven Gotz @ruveng spinsiders.com/ruveng ruveng@navantis.com
    5. 5. #SPFest @RHarbridge What We Will (Try To) Cover Today: 1. Why is SharePoint IA so difficult? 2. Visualizing and Communicating SharePoint Concepts 3. Information Architecture Tips and Tricks This deck is already up on slideshare – and even larger decks can be found online at http://www.PracticalIntranet.com
    6. 6. #SPFest @RHarbridge Why is SharePoint BA/IA so difficult?
    7. 7. #SPFest @RHarbridge SharePoint is huge…
    8. 8. #SPFest @RHarbridge The people stuff is complex…
    9. 9. #SPFest @RHarbridge It started out simple
    10. 10. #SPFest @RHarbridge Then it grew
    11. 11. #SPFest @RHarbridge Then it got TOTALLY out of control!!
    12. 12. #SPFest @RHarbridge Decision Makers Cant Seem To Agree… Not as much as a kitten picture rotator! We need a records management solution!
    13. 13. #SPFest @RHarbridge The CFO Watches Costs Increase Actually that requires a third party product.. Easy! Just need to customize one thing… That requires enterprise CALs…
    14. 14. #SPFest @RHarbridge IT Services Can’t Support The Flood Of New Requests
    15. 15. #SPFest @RHarbridge Shared Understanding Of Objectives
    16. 16. #SPFest @RHarbridgeConcept Courtesy of Andrew Jolly 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Abundance Of Helpful Data 1. Area Map 2. Our Direction 3. Our Route 4. Points Of Interest 5. Our Route Risks 6. Upcoming Action 7. Distance/Time To Goal 8. Estimated Duration 9. Current Speed/Limit 10. Current Road The Destination Matters What If We Haven’t Identified Our Destination/Goal?
    17. 17. #SPFest @RHarbridge Identifying Our Objectives
    18. 18. #SPFest @RHarbridge Abstract Objectives (Platitudes) These are not good objectives!
    19. 19. #SPFest @RHarbridge In Canada we learn this right after hockey appreciation in grade school.
    20. 20. #SPFest @RHarbridge
    21. 21. #SPFest @RHarbridge
    22. 22. #SPFest @RHarbridge We would like to automate and improve our ‘paper based’ ‘legal’ ‘contract mngmt’’ ‘contract rview’ processes. Specifically we would like to ‘imprv request rspnse time’ by…
    23. 23. #SPFest @RHarbridge Legal Contract Solutions • Contract Review Workflow • Request Contract Review Form • Integration with ClientDB • Client Contracts Site
    24. 24. #SPFest @RHarbridge Prioritizing Objectives Requires Understanding Value And Difficulty
    25. 25. #SPFest @RHarbridge The Simplest Prioritization Formula Ever… Estimated Value Estimated Difficulty
    26. 26. #SPFest @RHarbridge Prioritization Example  I have a difficult solution. It’s an 8 in difficulty (out of 10).  I have an easy solution. It’s a 2 in difficulty (out of 10).  The expected value of the difficult solution is 4 (out of 10).  The expected value of the easy solution is 6 (out of 10). Estimated Value Estimated Difficulty
    27. 27. #SPFest @RHarbridge Prioritize and Plan S.M.A.R.T. Objectives
    28. 28. #SPFest @RHarbridge The Right Approach To Achieving Objectives
    29. 29. #SPFest @RHarbridge What is the best approach to use when working with SharePoint?
    30. 30. #SPFest @RHarbridge ITERATIVE APPROACH
    31. 31. #SPFest @RHarbridge Why Iterative?  SharePoint is a very large platform.  It takes time to understand SharePoint.  SharePoint is great for rapid prototyping, and for proof of concept work.  It ensures there is enough time to review, adjust, and communicate.
    32. 32. #SPFest @RHarbridge How people think it works… Image from Paul Culmsee
    33. 33. #SPFest @RHarbridge How it really works… Image from Paul Culmsee
    34. 34. #SPFest @RHarbridge SharePoint is not a Silver Bullet… SharePoint is not a Silver Bullet at NothingButSharePoint.com
    35. 35. #SPFest @RHarbridge  Utilized by Business Users to develop and implement business solutions that use technology without IT’s direct involvement.  Our primary unified application delivery platform.  Our primary workflow/business process automation platform.  Our intranet and communication center for internal corporate communications.  … SharePoint will be…  Our (external) web content management platform.  Our primary document management platform.  Our contact management platform.  … SharePoint will not be…
    36. 36. #SPFest @RHarbridge Foundation Standard Enterprise SharePoint has Multiple Options 2007 2010 Online On Site
    37. 37. #SPFest @RHarbridge It’s Big Ecosystem
    38. 38. #SPFest @RHarbridge Implemented Legal Contracts Solution! Have we achieved our objective? Implemented SharePoint!
    39. 39. #SPFest @RHarbridge A Lesson Courtesy Of The Mars Rover Primary among the mission's scientific goals is to search for and characterize a wide range of rocks and soils that hold clues to past water activity on Mars.
    40. 40. #SPFest @RHarbridge Have We Achieved Our Goal? Concept Courtesy of Andrew Jolly
    41. 41. #SPFest @RHarbridge Have We Achieved Our Goal? Concept Courtesy of Andrew Jolly
    42. 42. #SPFest @RHarbridge Have We Achieved Our Goal? Concept Courtesy of Andrew Jolly
    43. 43. #SPFest @RHarbridge Have We Achieved Our Goal? Concept Courtesy of Andrew Jolly
    44. 44. #SPFest @RHarbridge Have We Achieved Our Goal? Concept Courtesy of Andrew Jolly
    45. 45. #SPFest @RHarbridge Launch Minded People Think… Pre Launch Launch Don’t blow up!
    46. 46. #SPFest @RHarbridge Pre Launch Launch Flight Landing Post Launch People Think… Have we succeeded in gaining adoption? Have we achieved our objectives? What are our objectives? How will we achieve them? Don’t blow up! What feedback are we getting? How should we adjust our trajectory?
    47. 47. #SPFest @RHarbridge Back to our friend the Mars Rover…
    48. 48. #SPFest @RHarbridge Have We Achieved Our Goal? Concept Courtesy of Andrew Jolly Achieved Primary Objective
    49. 49. #SPFest @RHarbridge How Important Was Launch? Concept Courtesy of Andrew Jolly Launch How many people understood how much was involved in planning for launch? How many people understood how much was involved after launch? Post Launch
    50. 50. #SPFest @RHarbridge Requirements Definition and Mapping
    51. 51. #SPFest @RHarbridge What makes something a requirement?
    52. 52. #SPFest @RHarbridge We can do that for $10
    53. 53. #SPFest @RHarbridge We can do that for $1 Million
    54. 54. #SPFest @RHarbridge The Power Of Zero $$ Change Orders
    55. 55. #SPFest @RHarbridge SharePoint chicken & egg problem
    56. 56. #SPFest @RHarbridge DON’T demo SharePoint
    57. 57. #SPFest @RHarbridge Understand Their Workload & Identify Challenges
    58. 58. #SPFest @RHarbridge
    59. 59. #SPFest @RHarbridge OK to demo SharePoint
    60. 60. #SPFest @RHarbridge Simple Scenarios Are Your Best Friend
    61. 61. #SPFest @RHarbridge
    62. 62. #SPFest @RHarbridge
    63. 63. #SPFest @RHarbridge When To Demo SharePoint  When you need help scoping requirements and managing expectations.  When you need help building awareness.  When validating requirements and solution approaches.  When you want to get people excited! When Not To Demo SharePoint  When you haven’t identified any of the audiences needs.  When you aren’t familiar with the tool/feature set being demonstrated.
    64. 64. #SPFest @RHarbridge How do you scale this? Send a questionnaire/survey before/after… You have three primary goals: • Get people excited enough to respond in the survey/questionnaire. • Evangelize a better way of doing things. • Better understand people’s needs/pain points.
    65. 65. #SPFest @RHarbridge Visualizing and Communicating IA Concepts
    66. 66. #SPFest @RHarbridge
    67. 67. #SPFest @RHarbridge Adapted from the “pea soup” story by Serge Tremblay
    68. 68. #SPFest @RHarbridge
    69. 69. #SPFest @RHarbridge
    70. 70. #SPFest @RHarbridge What is our Base Metaphor for files?
    71. 71. #SPFest @RHarbridge What if we saw this?
    72. 72. #SPFest @RHarbridge Better…
    73. 73. #SPFest @RHarbridge Solve with folders
    74. 74. #SPFest @RHarbridge Hire an intern
    75. 75. #SPFest @RHarbridge
    76. 76. #SPFest @RHarbridge This is metadata!
    77. 77. #SPFest @RHarbridge The #1 rule of SharePoint? Never use folders Except when it makes sense ever
    78. 78. #SPFest @RHarbridge Folders for Security Permissions assigned per folder
    79. 79. #SPFest @RHarbridge Customer Type • Lab • Hospital • Clinic • Mobile Sector • Private • Public Size • Large • Medium • Small Location • Urban • Rural University • Yes • No Metadata
    80. 80. #SPFest @RHarbridge Adding Metadata (when uploading)
    81. 81. #SPFest @RHarbridge A SharePoint Simulation
    82. 82. #SPFest @RHarbridge What are content types?
    83. 83. #SPFest @RHarbridge Name _________ Emp. # _________ Date _________ Dates Requested: From __________ To: __________ Manager ________ Approved Y/N Name _________ Emp. # _________ Date _________ Drug Used: Name __________ Cost: $ _________ Manager ________ Approved Y/N Vacation Request Drug Reimbursement
    84. 84. #SPFest @RHarbridge Both Content Types in One Library
    85. 85. #SPFest @RHarbridge Content Types for: Workflo w, Policy,Security
    86. 86. #SPFest @RHarbridge Tools For The Information Architect
    87. 87. #SPFest @RHarbridge Mind Mapping Demonstration
    88. 88. #SPFest @RHarbridge Navigation workshops
    89. 89. #SPFest @RHarbridge Navigational Map
    90. 90. #SPFest @RHarbridge Navigation Systems • Global navigation • Local navigation • Breadcrumbs/Up One Level Control • Contextual navigation • Supplemental navigation – Sitemap – A-Z Index – Guides
    91. 91. #SPFest @RHarbridge IBIS mapping demonstration http://www.cognexus.org/
    92. 92. #SPFest @RHarbridge What is Card Sorting?
    93. 93. #SPFest @RHarbridge “Card sorting is a great, reliable, inexpensive method for finding patterns in how users would expect to find content or functionality.” - Donna Spencer http://www.amazon.com/Card-Sorting-ebook/dp/B004VFUOL0
    94. 94. #SPFest @RHarbridge Why use Card Sorting? • Card sorting can help you identify trends – Do the users want to see the information grouped by subject, process, business group, or information type? – How similar are the needs of the different user groups? – How many potential main categories are there? • What should those groups be called?
    95. 95. #SPFest @RHarbridge Types of Card Sorting • Open Card Sorting – Participants are given cards showing site content with no pre-established groupings. • Closed Card Sorting – Participants are given cards showing site content with an established initial set of primary groups.
    96. 96. #SPFest @RHarbridge Open card sorting process Gerbil
    97. 97. #SPFest @RHarbridge Results Gerbil
    98. 98. #SPFest @RHarbridge But not always what you expect Ford Gerbil
    99. 99. #SPFest @RHarbridge But not always what you expect Ford Gerbil
    100. 100. #SPFest @RHarbridge Analysis http://www.boxesandarrows.com/view/analyzing_card_sort_results_with_a_ spreadsheet_template
    101. 101. #SPFest @RHarbridge Advantages of Card Sorting • Simple • Cheap • Quick to execute • Established • Involves users • Provides a good foundation
    102. 102. #SPFest @RHarbridge Disadvantages of Sorting • Does not consider users’ tasks • Results may vary • Analysis can be time consuming • May capture “surface” characteristics only
    103. 103. #SPFest @RHarbridge Document inventory workshops
    104. 104. #SPFest @RHarbridge Analyze Existing Content • What type of content is it? • How is the content organized today? • What is the purpose of the content? • Who is the author of the content? • What format is the content in? • Who uses the content? • Where is the content currently located?
    105. 105. #SPFest @RHarbridge
    106. 106. #SPFest @RHarbridge
    107. 107. #SPFest @RHarbridge Use Survey Tools! Compiling results from 20 to 50 participants using excel sheets/hand outs can be painful. If you expect many responses use a survey tool instead.
    108. 108. #SPFest @RHarbridge The Inventory Worksheet
    109. 109. #SPFest @RHarbridge Build Mind Map (based on inventory worksheet)
    110. 110. #SPFest @RHarbridge Wireframing, and Process Mapping
    111. 111. #SPFest @RHarbridge Wireframing Workshops
    112. 112. #SPFest @RHarbridge Balsamiq
    113. 113. #SPFest @RHarbridge Common Intranet Components Component Name Purpose Message from the President/Owner/Founder Informative News and Announcements Informative Blog Updates Informative Wiki Updates Informative System Status Informative Upcoming Events/Calendar Informative New Hires/Arrivals Informative Employee Anniversaries/Milestones/Years of Service Informative Recent Departures/Retirements Informative Videos Informative Photos Informative Podcasts Informative Stock Quotes Informative Stock Chart? Informative Weather Informative World Clocks/Office Time Informative Employee Spotlight Informative Contacts Informative Recent Discussions Informative Quick Links/Shortcuts/ Navigation Site Map Navigation Tag Cloud Navigation Search Box (Employee Search, Intranet Search, Etc) Navigation Polls Feedback Provide Feedback Feedback Component Name Purpose Email This Page Sharing Print This Page Sharing Search Tips Informative New Job Openings/Postings Informative Quick Start to Services Navigation How do I/Training/Learning Materials Informative Advertisements Informative New Messages/Notes Informative Availability Dashboard Informative Upcoming Calls/Web Meetings Informative Recent Questions and Recent Answers Informative Community Spotlight/Highlight Informative Site/Department/Team Spotlight/Highlight Informative Inspiring Quote Informative Highlighted/Urgent/Past Due Tasks Informative Most Viewed Content Informative Most Recently Contributed Content Informative Recently Added Projects Informative Survey Feedback Bookmarked Content Informative Top Searches Informative Discounts (Organizational for Retail) Informative Sales Goals Informative Visitors/People Out Of Office Informative Phone List Informative
    114. 114. #SPFest @RHarbridge Balsamiq DEMO
    115. 115. #SPFest @RHarbridge Business Process Workshops
    116. 116. #SPFest @RHarbridge Visio 2010 Demo
    117. 117. #SPFest @RHarbridge Common Intranet Processes • Absence Reporting and Vacation Scheduling • Expense Reimbursement • Equipment and Room Reservation and Management • Meeting Planning and Management • Policy Review and Approval • Booking Travel • Interview Management and Hiring Processes • Training Sign Up and Management • Event Planning • Change Request Management • Timecard/Time Tracking • Product Planning • Help Desk Ticket Management • Compliance Support • Contacts Management • Inventory Tracking • Lending Tracking • Sales Lead Pipeline
    118. 118. #SPFest @RHarbridge Roadmap
    119. 119. #SPFest @RHarbridge Questions? Ideas? Feedback? Contact me:  Twitter: @RHarbridge  Blog: http://www.RHarbridge.com  Email: Richard@RHarbridge.com Slides & SharePoint Resource Kit Available At: http://Learning.AllinConsulting.com/ILTA How Do You Ensure Success? Shared Understanding and Value Lead To Shared Commitment…
    120. 120. #SPFest @RHarbridge Making Information Architecture Decisions
    121. 121. #SPFest @RHarbridge The Importance of Making Good Information Architecture Decisions
    122. 122. #SPFest @RHarbridge Governance and IA? Home Page Functional Areas Department Site – “Public” Department Team Site – “Private” Project/Initiative Team Sites Personal Sites– My Sites “PUBLIC” SITES: Open to all employees TEAM SITES: Generally open to team members Tightly controlled, formal governance Looser control, less formal governance Some control, some formal governance “PRIVATE” SITES: Open to business group members Animated Slide Provider: Susan Hanley
    123. 123. #SPFest @RHarbridge Recommended Approach
    124. 124. #SPFest @RHarbridge Incorporate Feedback Planning Couldn’t Find What You Were Looking For? Let Us Know (On Search Pages) Do You Like The New Homepage Design? Click I Like It or Leave A Note! (Simple front end code/webparts means users don’t even have to go to the ribbon.) Intranet Design or Improvement Contests Want More? Give Users a Bookmark Feature and Analyze User BookmarksBlog New Features/Changes and Encourage Comments Provide Feedback Button & Custom List How about a site review process where you encourage feedback?
    125. 125. #SPFest @RHarbridge SharePoint Containment Hierarchy Documents, Items and Pages Folders and Document Sets Libraries and Lists Sites Site Collections Databases Web Applications Servers Farm What we care about from an information architecture perspective.
    126. 126. #SPFest @RHarbridge SharePoint Containment Hierarchy Metadata Item Documents, Events, Pages, Custom Item, Image, etc. Folders and Document Sets Lists Doc Libraries, Pages, Calendars, Discussions, Surveys, etc. Sites Team Sites, Publishing Sites, Meeting Workspaces, etc. Site Collections
    127. 127. #SPFest @RHarbridge Site Collection or Site (Subsite)? OR
    128. 128. #SPFest @RHarbridge Site Collection
    129. 129. #SPFest @RHarbridge Site Collection
    130. 130. #SPFest @RHarbridge When To Use A Site Collection
    131. 131. #SPFest @RHarbridge When To Use A Site Collection
    132. 132. #SPFest @RHarbridge When To Use A Site Collection
    133. 133. #SPFest @RHarbridge When To Use A Site Collection
    134. 134. #SPFest @RHarbridge When To Use A Site Collection
    135. 135. #SPFest @RHarbridge When To Use A Site Collection
    136. 136. #SPFest @RHarbridge When To Use A Site Collection Site Collection 1 Site Collection 2 Webparts & Aggregation Webparts & Aggregation Masterpages & Page Layouts Masterpages & Page Layouts Search Across Site Collection Boundaries Navigation Navigation
    137. 137. #SPFest @RHarbridge When To Use A Site Collection Group A Group B Group C Collection Admin A Collection Admin B Group Y Group Z Collection Admin Y Collection Admin Z Site Collection 1 Site Collection 2
    138. 138. #SPFest @RHarbridge Purpose of a List? • To Replace Excel Spreadsheets • To Track Complex Input From Multiple People • To Centralize Storage and Retrieval of Content • To Provide Validation, Easy To Use Online Forms • To Reduce Duplication of Effort
    139. 139. #SPFest @RHarbridge One List or Multiple Lists? OR
    140. 140. #SPFest @RHarbridge When To Use a Single List • You want to simplify viewing the same set of items. (When dispersed across many lists it requires additional effort to aggregate the lists). • You want to search for items in the same location. (When dispersed across many lists it requires additional effort to configure search scopes). • You want to easily apply consistent versioning, approval, metadata or form settings. • You want to receive consolidated updates on the collection of items (alerts or RSS).
    141. 141. #SPFest @RHarbridge When To Use Multiple Lists • You don’t expect people to need summaries of the items together. (When dispersed across many lists it requires additional effort to aggregate the lists). • You need to apply different versioning, approval, metadata, or form settings. • You want to distribute management of versioning, metadata, workflows or form settings. • You do not need to receive consolidated updates (alerts or RSS).
    142. 142. #SPFest @RHarbridge Advanced Uses Of Lists
    143. 143. #SPFest @RHarbridge Calendar or Calendar View? ​Capabilities Calendar list Calendar view​ ​​Supports direct creation and editing of calendar entries. Yes No ​Supports calendar overlays and group calendars. ​Yes Doesn't apply ​​Supports future dates without requiring creation of a stub. Yes No ​Can view future dates once 'stubs' are created in the library or list. Doesn't apply ​Yes ​​List or library updates affect the calendar. ​No ​Yes Calendar updates affect the list or library. Yes Not typically ​​Simplest option if you already have a list that includes a date option. ​Yes http://sharepoint.microsoft.com/Blogs/GetThePoint/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?ID=554
    144. 144. #SPFest @RHarbridge One Library or Multiple Libraries? OR
    145. 145. #SPFest @RHarbridge When To Use a Single Library • You want to simplify viewing the same set of documents. (When dispersed across many libraries it requires additional effort to aggregate the libraries). • You want to search for documents in the same location. (When dispersed across many libraries it requires additional effort to configure search scopes). • You want to easily apply consistent versioning, approval, metadata or form settings. • You want to receive consolidated updates on the collection of documents (alerts or RSS).
    146. 146. #SPFest @RHarbridge When To Use Multiple Libraries • You don’t expect people to need summaries of the documents together. (When dispersed across many libraries it requires additional effort to aggregate the libraries). • You need to apply different versioning, approval, metadata, or form settings. • You want to distribute management of versioning, metadata, workflows or form settings. • You do not need to receive consolidated updates (alerts or RSS).
    147. 147. #SPFest @RHarbridge What Can You Do With A Document? New/Upload New Document Upload Document Upload Multiple Documents New Folder Collaborate Edit Document Check Out/Check In/Discard Check Out E-mail a Link View Version History Alert/Notify Me Manage Edit Document/Folder Metadata (Title, Name, etc) Manage Document Permissions Delete Document/Folder Re-Order Documents/Folders (Explorer View/Move Documents/Copy Documents) Download a Copy
    148. 148. #SPFest @RHarbridge Require Check Out or Don’t? OR
    149. 149. #SPFest @RHarbridge How do we do it? • Library tab • Library settings
    150. 150. #SPFest @RHarbridge Require Check Out?
    151. 151. #SPFest @RHarbridge Require Check Out?
    152. 152. #SPFest @RHarbridge Require Check Out? Not Enabled By Default
    153. 153. #SPFest @RHarbridge Require Check Out? When enabled bulk uploading or explorer view additions are checked out by default. Pro?
    154. 154. #SPFest @RHarbridge Require Check Out? Work Around: Navigate to Manage Content and Structure and then to the library. Select all of the documents and choose Check In from the action menu.
    155. 155. #SPFest @RHarbridge Require Check Out? You cannot edit multiple documents in datasheet view.
    156. 156. #SPFest @RHarbridge Require Check Out? Work Around: By turning the require check out option off we can make edits in the data sheet view temporarily and then re-active require check out.
    157. 157. #SPFest @RHarbridge Require Check Out? Workflows and code must check the file out before being able to update it/it’s metadata.
    158. 158. #SPFest @RHarbridge Require Check Out? When required check out is enabled ‘storing files to local drafts’ is an enabled option.
    159. 159. #SPFest @RHarbridge Require Check Out? Co-Authoring is disabled on libraries where check out is required.
    160. 160. #SPFest @RHarbridge • Office 2007 and Office 2010 let’s the user know it is being used by someone else. • This eventually times out. (15 mins on XP – 60 mins on Vista/Win7) • Other formats don't notify user. Don’t Require Check Out?
    161. 161. #SPFest @RHarbridge Require Check Out? • You do not need to co-author documents. • You do not need to bulk update metadata. • There is typically a high number of people updating the documents in this library. • Updates are made frequently to the same documents by different people.
    162. 162. #SPFest @RHarbridge • You do need to co-author documents. • You do need to bulk update metadata. • There are few people updating documents in this library. • Updates are not made frequently to the same documents by different people. Don’t Require Check Out?
    163. 163. #SPFest @RHarbridge List and Content Type Tip!
    164. 164. #SPFest @RHarbridge Default Content Types and Metadata Values
    165. 165. #SPFest @RHarbridge Navigating with Metadata Tip!
    166. 166. #SPFest @RHarbridge Navigating with Metadata, not Folders
    167. 167. #SPFest @RHarbridge Set up with Library Settings
    168. 168. #SPFest @RHarbridge Configure Setttings
    169. 169. #SPFest @RHarbridge Filters the list
    170. 170. #SPFest @RHarbridge Document Routing Tip!
    171. 171. #SPFest @RHarbridge Content Organizer and Routing
    172. 172. #SPFest @RHarbridge Configure the router
    173. 173. #SPFest @RHarbridge
    174. 174. #SPFest @RHarbridge Configure settings
    175. 175. #SPFest @RHarbridge Create Rules
    176. 176. #SPFest @RHarbridge Create/Modify Rules
    177. 177. #SPFest @RHarbridge
    178. 178. #SPFest @RHarbridge Use the Drop-off Library
    179. 179. #SPFest @RHarbridge Add a document
    180. 180. #SPFest @RHarbridge Enter Metadata
    181. 181. #SPFest @RHarbridge Detour: 2010 Metadata
    182. 182. #SPFest @RHarbridge
    183. 183. #SPFest @RHarbridge Back to Drop-off library
    184. 184. #SPFest @RHarbridge Your document was moved
    185. 185. #SPFest @RHarbridge Rules don’t apply…
    186. 186. #SPFest @RHarbridge … it doesn’t get moved
    187. 187. #SPFest @RHarbridge Folder or Metadata? OR
    188. 188. #SPFest @RHarbridge The #1 rule of SharePoint? Never use folders Except when it makes sense ever
    189. 189. #SPFest @RHarbridge What’s wrong with folders? • Deep structures hard to navigate • Finding stuff is hard • Figuring out where to put stuff is even harder • Stuck with a rigid structure • Search is not the silver bullet
    190. 190. #SPFest @RHarbridge What’s the alternative?
    191. 191. #SPFest @RHarbridge What’s the alternative?
    192. 192. #SPFest @RHarbridge Metadata = No more folders • Filtering • Views
    193. 193. #SPFest @RHarbridge Really? No more folders? Ever? • What situations would you use folders? • Subdivide large libraries/lists • Security/Permissions This is a favourite of mine • Ease of use for users Really? No more folders?Really?
    194. 194. #SPFest @RHarbridge Downsides of Metadata • No free lunch (there is pain here) • Awful architectural choices to make – Multiple site collections • Good Practice • Bad for Metadata • Maintenance headache – Can be mitigated • Define at top level if possible
    195. 195. #SPFest @RHarbridge Folders for easy permissions • Create folder • Set permissions • Create view without folders • Easy for users (they only see what they are supposed to)
    196. 196. #SPFest @RHarbridge Folders and Default Values
    197. 197. #SPFest @RHarbridge
    198. 198. #SPFest @RHarbridge The Sales document library
    199. 199. #SPFest @RHarbridge Drill down into Military folder
    200. 200. #SPFest @RHarbridge Drill down into Air-to-Ground
    201. 201. #SPFest @RHarbridge Add a new document here
    202. 202. #SPFest @RHarbridge Note: Some metadata prefilled
    203. 203. #SPFest @RHarbridge How did we do that? • Library tab • Library settings
    204. 204. #SPFest @RHarbridge Column default value settings
    205. 205. #SPFest @RHarbridge Select a folder and set defaults • Note folder inheritance
    206. 206. #SPFest @RHarbridge Set the default value
    207. 207. #SPFest @RHarbridge in SharePoint 2010 • Managed Metadata Service • Share Metadata across site collections • Multilingual Metadata (big gotcha ) • Hierarchical Metadata • Navigate via Metadata (already discussed) • Keywords/Folksonomy (Out of scope today) • Folders can assign default metadata (already discussed)
    208. 208. #SPFest @RHarbridge Term Store Management
    209. 209. #SPFest @RHarbridge Adding Terms
    210. 210. #SPFest @RHarbridge Turn off “Available for Tagging” • Add sub elements: Proposal, Quote, Invoice • Leave “Available for Tagging checked”
    211. 211. #SPFest @RHarbridge Term Store Manager • Painful & Slow • Needs a better way • I created a ‘toy’ to try out some ideas • http://bit.ly/ruveng-mmts – Article links to other solutions (Excel)
    212. 212. #SPFest @RHarbridge
    213. 213. #SPFest @RHarbridge CSV file for Import to Term Store
    214. 214. #SPFest @RHarbridge To Sum Up… • SharePoint 2007 – Folders BAAAAD! – Never use them – Except when the situation warrants • SharePoint 2010 – Folders GOOOOD! – Never use them – Except when the situation warrants
    215. 215. #SPFest @RHarbridge Folder or Document Set? OR
    216. 216. #SPFest @RHarbridge Folders vs. Document Sets Document Sets vs Folders
    217. 217. #SPFest @RHarbridge Document Sets Document Sets vs Folders
    218. 218. #SPFest @RHarbridge Folders and Default Values
    219. 219. #SPFest @RHarbridge Folders vs. Document Sets Document Sets vs Folders
    220. 220. #SPFest @RHarbridge Folders vs. Document Sets Document Sets vs Folders
    221. 221. #SPFest @RHarbridge Folders vs. Document Sets Document Sets vs Folders
    222. 222. #SPFest @RHarbridge Folders vs. Document Sets Document Sets vs Folders
    223. 223. #SPFest @RHarbridge Folders vs. Document Sets Document Sets vs Folders
    224. 224. #SPFest @RHarbridge Folders vs. Document Sets Document Library Document Folder Document Document Folder Folder Document Document Set Document Folder Folder Document Set Document Document
    225. 225. #SPFest @RHarbridge Sites vs Pages? • See this great whitepaper by Susan Hanley and Scott Jamison http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/det ails.aspx?id=12500
    226. 226. #SPFest @RHarbridge Information Architecture Tips and Tricks
    227. 227. #SPFest @RHarbridge Make it easier to work with
    228. 228. #SPFest @RHarbridge Make it easier to work with Powerful Columns You Probably Didn’t Know About
    229. 229. #SPFest @RHarbridge Make it easier to work with Why Leveraging SharePoint Blog Features for News is a Great Idea
    230. 230. #SPFest @RHarbridge Choice vs Lookup Column • Susan Hanley – At it again! http://cloud.snappages.com/b8898dc2c08e13 7d03449de65b9e82e108c15658/Choice_v_Lo okup_Column_Tradeoffs.pdf
    231. 231. #SPFest @RHarbridge Time Challenges in SharePoint Projects
    232. 232. #SPFest @RHarbridge
    233. 233. #SPFest @RHarbridge Giving Estimates Two Simple Tricks For Making Better Estimates Never Give a Single Number 6 Hours! At least 2 hours… 4 hours maybe? How Long Will X Take You? 16? Way too much. 8 Tops. I better pick something in between… Forgotten/Not Shared Now That We Have Our Magic Number
    234. 234. #SPFest @RHarbridge Always Give Ranged Estimates Two Simple Tricks For Making Better Estimates Ranged Estimates Help Communicate Confidence and Set Expectations 2-8 Hours!
    235. 235. #SPFest @RHarbridge Are You Confident In That Range? Two Simple Tricks For Making Better Estimates 2-8
    236. 236. #SPFest @RHarbridge Are You Confident In That Range? Two Simple Tricks For Making Better Estimates ORWithin Range Actual Result OVERCONFIDENT
    237. 237. #SPFest @RHarbridge Are You Confident In That Range? Two Simple Tricks For Making Better Estimates ORWithin Range Actual Result LESS CONFIDENT
    238. 238. #SPFest @RHarbridge Are You Confident In That Range? Two Simple Tricks For Making Better Estimates ORWithin Range Actual Result 90% Confident
    239. 239. #SPFest @RHarbridge Give 90% Confident Ranged Estimates Two Simple Tricks For Making Better Estimates 2-8 Hours! Within Range =
    240. 240. #SPFest @RHarbridge Visualizing Timelines An easy way to create shared understanding of the impact estimates make on projects.
    241. 241. #SPFest @RHarbridge Visualizing Existing Timelines A great way to take existing project timelines and set stakeholder expectations or communicate impact of changes.
    242. 242. #SPFest @RHarbridge IBIS Dialog Mapping
    243. 243. #SPFest @RHarbridge Productivity Hub
    244. 244. #SPFest @RHarbridge IUseSharePoint Download and install the ‘lunch’ and learn module - an interesting idea.
    245. 245. #SPFest @RHarbridge SharePoint Permissions
    246. 246. #SPFest @RHarbridge AD Groups or SharePoint Groups? OR
    247. 247. #SPFest @RHarbridge Advantages Disadvantages SharePoint Group • Not reliant on AD (if your AD is a mess) • Distributed ownership and management options • Managed by users • Can be managed by the SharePoint Object Model • Members of these groups are visible to users in SharePoint. • Only used in SharePoint • Managed by (potentially) untrained users • One more place to manage security (independent of AD) • Cannot contain another SharePoint group as a member. Active Directory Group • Managed by domain administrators • Available in many systems • Centralized management and easier removal • Difficult to determine permissions assigned to people • Requires lots of planning • Members of these groups are not visible in SharePoint. • User can only be a member of 1024 AD groups (recursively). SharePoint Groups vs AD Groups
    248. 248. #SPFest @RHarbridge Item Level Permissions
    249. 249. #SPFest @RHarbridge “Item Level” Permissions
    250. 250. #SPFest @RHarbridge Web Level Permissions
    251. 251. #SPFest @RHarbridge Targeted Code New in SharePoint 2010 SPRoleAssignmentCollection.AddToCurrentScopeOnly
    252. 252. #SPFest @RHarbridge Do you have a Taxonomy Strategy?
    253. 253. #SPFest @RHarbridge Do you have a Support Strategy? SharePoint Standards Online
    254. 254. #SPFest @RHarbridge Do you have a Staffing Strategy? Building A SharePoint Team
    255. 255. #SPFest @RHarbridge Questions? Ideas? Feedback? Contact me:  Twitter: @RHarbridge  Blog: http://www.RHarbridge.com  Email: Richard@RHarbridge.com Slides & SharePoint Resource Kit Available At: http://Learning.AllinConsulting.com/ILTA How Do You Ensure Success? Shared Understanding and Value Lead To Shared Commitment…

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