One Shot Source Integration

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How to integrate outside research into your own writing

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One Shot Source Integration

  1. 1. From Research to Writing . . . HOW?
  2. 2. Why do we cite sources? <ul><li>To let our readers know how we arrived at our conclusions (gives more credibility to our ideas) </li></ul><ul><li>To stand on the shoulders of the scholars who came before us – and allow others to stand on our shoulders </li></ul><ul><li>Because giving credit to others is the honest thing to do! </li></ul>
  3. 3. What should I cite? <ul><li>Direct quotations </li></ul><ul><li>Someone else’s unique ideas (in a paraphrase) </li></ul><ul><li>Statistics </li></ul><ul><li>Diagrams, images, sound clips </li></ul>
  4. 4. I don’t have to cite: <ul><li>My own ideas or conclusions </li></ul><ul><li>Things that are “commonly known” by my audience </li></ul>
  5. 5. How to paraphrase <ul><li>Read the other person’s idea/opinion, and understand it. </li></ul><ul><li>Close the book/website/article. </li></ul><ul><li>If stuck here, try to explain the idea verbally to someone else. </li></ul><ul><li>Write out the idea/opinion. </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure to include the person’s name/affiliation in your paraphrase. </li></ul><ul><li>Check back with the original. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t forget your citation! </li></ul>
  6. 6. Example: <ul><li>Dr. Buddhima Lokuge, a spokesperson for Doctors Without Borders, that the current drug patent system does not encourage researchers to invent new drugs to combat HIV/AIDS. Instead, , the system actually inhibits the distribution of desperately-needed antiretroviral HIV/AIDS drugs in poor countries, by driving up the costs per patient (qtd. in Bristol). </li></ul>Person’s name & affiliation In-text citation suggests he writes
  7. 7. Integrating your paraphrase <ul><li>Make a “sandwich” with your research information: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Start with your point (the topic sentence of the paragraph). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use a transitional phrase or word to bring in your research. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>End with your conclusions or a summary of the research, in your own words. </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Integrating the paraphrase <ul><li>There is a common misconception that US drug patent policies will help encourage drug companies to work on new medicines that work against the HIV/AIDS virus. On the contrary, Dr. Buddhima Lokuge, a spokesperson for Doctors Without Borders, suggests that the current drug patent system does not encourage researchers to invent new drugs to combat HIV/AIDS. Instead, he writes, the system actually inhibits the distribution of desperately-needed antiretroviral HIV/AIDS drugs in poor countries, by driving up the costs per patient (qtd. in Bristol). Sticking to current policy will only lead to more spread of the virus; clearly, policy needs to change. </li></ul>Introduce the idea of the paragraph (topic sentence) research End the paragraph with your summary/conclusions transition
  9. 9. P.S. Here’s how the two citation pieces fit together: <ul><li>In text citation: </li></ul><ul><li>. . . by driving up the costs per patient (qtd. in Bristol). </li></ul><ul><li>Works Cited citation: </li></ul><ul><li>Bristol, N. (2007, October 26). Battling HIV/AIDS. CQ Researcher , 17 , 889-912. Retrieved November 4, 2007, from CQ Researcher Online, http://library.cqpress.com/cqresearcher/cqresrre2007102600. </li></ul>

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