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032815 DBM Schedule Development Workshop

Hi @ALL,

After putting together and facilitating at least fifteen schedule development collaborative workshops in the last fifteen years, I have decided to share my experience through this short article. The subject should elicit interest from the management communities, most particularly those in project management because of its significance. Developing the project schedule has to start somewhere and it has to start properly. One cannot just pull activities together to plan and schedule. It is not as simple as that.

Design-based memorandum (DBM) is the stage when project execution and supporting documents are not yet fully complete for final sanction and approval (see Appendix Section 14.0, Figure 4). A DBM schedule is down to the discipline level of details. The project manager and/or the project controls manager shall decide how to reflect the Level 2 activities.

In many cases, the DBM schedule has an engineering phase that is at or almost at the EDS stage. If this is the case, the DBM schedule shall be resource-loaded with frozen estimated quantities for the particular stage. The level of details of all the phases should be more or less about the same. This is particularly important if the project plans to subject the schedule to risk analysis.

There are two major collaborative choices in developing the DBM schedule. The preferred option is a face-to-face workshop. An alternative method is a remote (virtual) collaborative workshop. Each one has advantages and disadvantages over the other. We will discuss some of them in the succeeding sections.

Rufran (032815)

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032815 DBM Schedule Development Workshop

  1. 1. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGES 1.0 INTRODUCTION.....................................................................................................2 2.0 OBJECTIVES.............................................................................................................3 3.0 PARTICIPANTS.......................................................................................................3 4.0 RESPONSIBILITIES OF FACILITATORS.......................................................4 5.0 SUGGESTED FACILITATOR...............................................................................4 6.0 INFORMATION NEEDED BY FACILITATOR/S .........................................5 7.0 PRECAUTION ..........................................................................................................6 8.0 DEFINITION.............................................................................................................6 9.0 PROGRAM.................................................................................................................7 10.0 MATERIALS REQUIRED .................................................................................9 10.1 MATERIALS FOR FACE-TO-FACE COLLABORATION .......................9 10.2 MATERIALS FOR REMOTE COLLABORATION..................................11 11.0 FOOD....................................................................................................................11 11.1 FOOD (FACE-TO-FACE COLLABORATION)........................................11 11.2 FOOD (REMOTE COLLABORATION).....................................................12 12.0 SCHEDULE.........................................................................................................12 12.1 FACE-TO-FACE COLLABORATION SCHEDULE.................................12 12.2 REMOTE COLLABORATION SCHEDULE..............................................14 13.0 RULES OF ENGAGEMENT...........................................................................15 13.1 FACE-TO-FACE COLLABORATION RULES OF ENGAGEMENT...15 13.2 REMOTE COLLABORATION RULES OF ENGAGEMENT................15 14.0 PROCEDURE.....................................................................................................16 14.1 FACE-TO-FACE COLLABORATION PROCEDURE.............................16 14.2 REMOTE COLLABORATION PROCEDURE..........................................24 15.0 APPENDIX..........................................................................................................28 16.0 INDEX ..................................................................................................................34
  2. 2. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 2 1.0 INTRODUCTION After putting together and facilitating at least fifteen schedule development collaborative workshops in the last fifteen years, I have decided to share my experience through this short article. The subject should elicit interest from the management communities, most particularly those in project management because of its significance. Developing the project schedule has to start somewhere and it has to start properly. One cannot just pull activities together to plan and schedule. It is not as simple as that. Design-based memorandum (DBM) is the stage when project execution and supporting documents are not yet fully complete for final sanction and approval (see Appendix Section 15.0, Figure 4). A DBM schedule is down to the discipline level of details. The project manager and/or the project controls manager shall decide how to reflect the Level 2 activities. In lot of cases, the DBM schedule has engineering phase at or almost at the EDS stage. Engineering is the most matured phase during DBM as it is in the front end. This is a reflection of the fact, that DBM and EDS overlaps. There are EDS efforts started as soon as a particular engineering discipline captures his DBM data. If this is the case, the DBM schedule shall be resource-loaded with frozen estimated quantities for the particular stage. The level of details of all the phases should be more or less about the same. This is particularly important if the project plans to subject the schedule to risk analysis. There are two major collaborative choices in developing the DBM schedule. The preferred option is a face-to-face workshop. An alternative method is a remote (virtual) collaborative workshop. Each one has advantages and disadvantages over the other. We will discuss some of them in the succeeding sections.
  3. 3. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 3 2.0 OBJECTIVES This write up shall explain the collaborative methodology of developing the project schedule. We will attempt to describe, as well as demonstrate the preferred inter-active approach to planning and scheduling where stakeholders have more personal and effective face-to-face contacts. The DBM schedule development collaborative workshop delves into the review and validation of the project scope, overall strategy, key level 2 activities and sequence, required documents, standards/procedures, participants’ combination experience will then become the key source of information. This interactive planning session results into a Level 2 DBM Schedule. The project shall not approve the project DBM schedule without holding an acceptable collaborative development workshop as described in the succeeding sections. Through active interaction, the gathered group will assess the Level 2 schedule activities against the current goal posts and come up with the necessary adjustment to the schedule in order to meet expectations. The other angle to consider is to look at the sensibleness of the goal posts. At the end of the session, the project team shall come up with an achievable integrated DBM schedule. During the EDS stage, the DBM schedule will provide the major basis of the Baseline Execution schedule. 3.0 PARTICIPANTS Participants of the subject workshop are composed of all stakeholders representing the major phases of the project; engineering, procurement, fabrication, modularization, field construction, commissioning, start-up, and close out. Participants include representatives from each of the engineering disciplines (process, civil, architectural, structural, mechanical, piping, stress, electrical, instrumentation, distributed control system, etc.), designated representatives from
  4. 4. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 4 engineering management, project management, integration management, project risk management, fabrication, modularization, procurement, contracts, field construction, prime contractors, commissioning, start-up, regulatory compliance, environmental, health, safety, and other stakeholders, depending on their influence and relevance. The aforementioned list serves only as a guide but bear in mind that the more complete the complements of schedule stakeholders are, the better. The lead planner, project manager and/or the project controls manager responsible in arranging the workshop shall make the call whom to involve. The stakeholder participants’ combined experience is the basic source of information. 4.0 RESPONSIBILITIES OF FACILITATORS 4.1. Start the workshop on time. 4.2. Give all participants effective instructions. 4.3. Steer the participants so they can give the best inputs 4.4. Do not try to solve everything in the workshop. 4.5. List down the parking lot items or get someone to help him. 4.6. Give everyone an opportunity to participate. 4.7. Avoid dominating the engagement floor. 4.8. Give appreciation to active participants/disciplines. 4.9. Check for understanding. 4.10. Listen actively and complete the loop of communication. 5.0 SUGGESTED FACILITATOR At least one designated planning subject matter expert will do. It is ideal if the workshop will have two so they can work in tandem. One facilitator for every
  5. 5. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 5 twenty participants is a good rule that we can use for the workshop to be more effective and efficient. The usual and more common facilitators are anyone of the following: 5.1 Lead Planner/Scheduler 5.2 Senior Planning Specialist 5.3 Senior Project Controls Specialist 5.4 Designated Planning and Scheduling Subject Matter Expert (SME) 5.5 Project Controls Lead or Project Controls Manager 5.6 Project Leader or Project Manager 6.0 INFORMATION NEEDED BY FACILITATOR/S The facilitator needs the list of participants and other would be attendees/observers. They should all be schedule stakeholders representing the major phases of the project (EPFMC/C&SU), i.e. engineering, procurement, fabrication, modularization, construction, commissioning, and start-up. The list of driving goal posts is very important. These goal posts comprise major critical milestones including the expected start of the project, project finish dates, operational outage window, regulatory dates, key interface milestones, turnover dates, and other salient dates that are driving the rest of the other Level 2 activities. Facilitators have to read and familiarize with available working information from DBM Project Execution Plan, DBM PC Management Plan, DBM Basis of Schedule, PC Risk Management Plan, DBM Estimate, latest progress report, Project Kick-off Presentation, preliminary Path of Construction (POC) and Commissioning/Start-up documents.
  6. 6. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 6 Knowledge of typical scheduling fragnets will be a big help during the planning session. Standards and guidelines surrounding model reviews are essential in being able to steer the engineers to the right direction. Such knowledge provides an unwavering confidence that translates to good facilitation. Participants easily recognize a faltering facilitator burdened by ignorance and inexperience. The facilitator must avoid such situations using all the resources at his command. Otherwise, some of the substance in the DBM participative planning session will be lost. 7.0 PRECAUTION The schedule should not pass the DBM checkpoint unless the engineering resource-loaded schedule undergoes a series of interactive planning review sessions. An integrated DBM schedule should be a mandatory project requirement (Frago, Preliminary Project Execution Plan (Schedule & Cost), 2013). The schedule developed during DBM is not the execution baseline. It is not the schedule approved for execution. The DBM schedule is the initial or preliminary schedule leading to the formulation of an integrated execution baseline schedule, commonly tagged as the EDS schedule (Frago, Integrative Planning and Scheduling Process, 2015). 8.0 DEFINITION a) The term “blank paper wall timeline” in this document points to the pre-printed Phase/Discipline versus calendar time rows/column format a DBM face-to-face collaborative workshop uses as medium/tool for interactive scheduling.
  7. 7. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 7 b) Participant/discipline is any important, influential, and qualified project stakeholder who represents a responsible group in the project. They actively participate and provide essential planning and scheduling inputs. The terms participants, disciplines, participants/disciplines, discipline/participant, schedule stakeholders, and stakeholder participants/disciplines are interchangeable in this document. c) Interactive planning, collaborative planning, collaborative planning, participative planning, collaborative workshop, and schedule development workshop are interchangeable terminology in this document. d) This write up is applicable to all projects developing the DBM schedule regardless of project size and complexity. e) The goal posts comprise major milestones including the expected start of the project, project finish dates, turnover dates, and other salient dates. 9.0 PROGRAM Just like any collaboration, a special session like this requires a program or a specific agenda. The agenda shall at least answer the following. • Who are the participants? • Who is/are the facilitator/s? • What are required from the participants? • What information the participants need? • What is the framework of the workshop? • What is the main objective of the workshop? • What is the rule of engagement? • What are the other expectations? • What is the interaction timeline? • What should the participants bring?
  8. 8. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 8 • What are the pre-works to accomplish? • What are the discussion items to avoid? • What are the roles of these participants? • What group does each participant represent? • What is the deadline of DBM schedule submission? • Why should the participants attend? • Why is this collaboration session important? • Where is the venue? (Provide map as needed) • Where is the emergency exit and wash room? • When is it? • When is the submission of the pre-works? • How should the participants prepare themselves? • How should the participants accomplish pre-work? • How should the facilitator resolve conflicts and indecisions? The designated facilitators should try to formulate other relevant questions that can help solidify the participant’s understanding of what is required. The more they understand the upcoming proceedings, the better the chances of success. The higher the quality of the DBM schedule and the more robust the foundation of the EDS schedule.
  9. 9. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 9 Typical Agenda: DATE : December 8, 2015 Venue: Conference Room 1, Carriage Inn, Calgary, Alberta TIME ACTIVITY DESCRIPTION RESPONSIBLE 6:00 AM - 7:00 AM Breakfast As per arrangement 7:00 AM - 7:05 AM Pass the agenda and the attendance sheet. Facilitator 7:05 AM - 7:15 AM Welcome the Participants/Safety Moment PC Manager/Facilitator 7:15 AM - 7:30 AM Round Table Introduction ALL 7:30 AM - 8:00 AM PPS Instruction/Guide Summary Facilitator 8:00 AM -11:30 AM Morning Session (with one 10 minutes break) ALL 11:30 AM -12:30 PM Lunch ALL 12:30 PM - 4:30 PM Afternoon Session (with two 10 minutes break) ALL 4:30 PM - 5:00 PM Recap/Summarize (Day 1 PPS ends) Facilitator 10.0 MATERIALS REQUIRED 10.1 MATERIALS FOR FACE-TO-FACE COLLABORATION 9.1.1. Prepare a pre-printed blank timeline on a paper at least 60” wide, with length enough to accommodate the expected duration of the project. If the project is expected to start in July 2015 and end in June 2017, it is suggested to have -/+ 6 months incorporated unto the timeline. It means that the wall timeline shall reflect the January-June 2015 as well as the July-December 2017 windows of opportunities. The additional timeframes are there to accommodate possible changes, making the ongoing effort to develop a fit for purpose schedule possible. Fit-for-
  10. 10. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 10 purpose schedule strategy is fundamental to a more effective risk-based management approach. Note that project management might also require the close out phase included in the developed schedule. If such requirement exists, I recommend adding another three to six months into the timeline for visual clarity. If not added on the wall timeline, the project controls manager must explain such that all schedule stakeholders/participants understand what the close out period is about and that it will be a part of the final developed DBM schedule, and the subsequent EDS schedule development. • The paper must have the row and column format shown in Figure 1, Figure 2, and Figure 3. The row contains the list of all pertinent stakeholder disciplines/participants for each of the phase (EPFMC/C&SU). The columns define the time- period that covers the entire project. 9.1.2. Additional materials to prepare: • Fifteen pads different colors of stick-on/post-it note, two each. There are 34 available colors of post-it notes. • Two free standing white boards • Two flip charts with refill (see Figure 8) • Four boxes of whiteboard markers (see Figure 9) • Two Elmer’s glue-sticks • Three boxes of masking tape & scotch tape each (Figure 10) • Three boxes of coloured push pins (Figure 6) • Five pen corrector (see Figure 11)
  11. 11. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 11 10.2 MATERIALS FOR REMOTE COLLABORATION 9.2.1. Common collaborative folder or shared folder 9.2.2. Tools and applications; e.g. Excel, Oracle Primavera P6 Project Management, MS Projects, others 9.2.3. Blank table timeline (see Figure 7) generated from the available tool; e.g. Excel 9.2.4. Video/Web-conferencing application; e.g. Citrix GoToMeeting, Lync, Blackboard, Viber, Blackberry Video Chat/Messenger, Skype, and several others 9.2.5. Participant’s active workstations, loaded with the necessary application. 11.0 FOOD 11.1 FOOD (FACE-TO-FACE COLLABORATION) The face-to-face schedule development workshop of a relatively large complex project can take from one to three days (sometimes even more). It is advisable to have food available on the same venue, as close to the engagement room (breakfast, and lunch). Dinner is optional. This prevents participants from straying off course due to distractions. Free-flowing coffee, snacks, and hunger relieving food tidbits are excellent mental sustenance while interaction is going on.
  12. 12. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 12 11.2 FOOD (REMOTE COLLABORATION) Not applicable unless a group is to gather in one web/video conference room. The primary facilitator has to assign a remote facilitator. If that happens, it will somehow defeat the portability of the remote option. 12.0 SCHEDULE 12.1 FACE-TO-FACE COLLABORATION SCHEDULE The recommended workshop schedule should follow an unbroken consecutive days of engagement. If the expected time to complete the workshop is three days, then it means three consecutive days. Experience dictates that Tuesday is the best first day to start when duration is less than four days. Although majority of participants are refreshed come Monday, a good percentage of them are still recovering from the weekend activities. Monday represents the start of the employee’s weekly productivity curve, the time when he catches up with the requirements of the next few days. Friday on the other hand, is the day when employees tend to slow down and get distracted, looking forward to family affairs. Monday holds more promise in terms of productivity compared to a Friday. In conclusion, it is wiser to avoid Friday. Do not expect that each day is an effective eight-hour day. Although, the daily schedule is for eight, the effective collaborative engagement is about five to six hours. Start at 7 AM if possible (might sometimes depend on key participant/s). Avoid a 9 AM and later start. It is too late for the day. Breakfast starts thirty minutes to one hour earlier. The ideal lunch is from thirty to forty-five minutes only. Participants can bring their food to the discussion table if they want to. Look at the following examples.
  13. 13. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 13 • For two-day workshop: Tuesday, Wednesday 7 AM to 11:30 AM, 12 PM to 4:30 PM Optional breaks: o Two 10 minutes breaks in the morning o One 10 minutes break in the afternoon. • For three-day workshop: Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 7 AM to 11:30 AM, 12 PM to 4:30 PM Optional breaks: o Two 10 minutes breaks in the morning o One 10 minutes break in the afternoon • For four-day workshop: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 7 AM to 11:30 AM, 12 PM to 4:30 PM Optional breaks: o Two 10 minutes breaks in the morning o One 10 minutes break in the afternoon
  14. 14. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 14 12.2 REMOTE COLLABORATION SCHEDULE The recommended remote workshop schedule should recognize the differences in time between localities. As the time difference between international location increases, the effective collaboration hours diminishes. It can come to a situation where a remote workshop is no longer practical and can become less attractive, burdensome, and uneconomical. It can result to longer window but resulting in less engagement and unacceptable results that cannot be resolved properly. Let us say three of the twenty-five important participants are from the engineering offices in Mumbai, India while the rest are in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. The biggest challenge facing the organizers is the time difference of almost twelve hours. Mumbai, India is ahead by ~12 hours. When it is 7 AM in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, it is already 6:30 PM in Mumbai, India (see Figure 5). In cases like this, depending upon the urgency of the situation, it is advisable for the sponsoring company to bring the three individuals to Calgary instead for a face-to-face collaboration workshop. On the other hand, remote workshop becomes possible if the three individuals are willing to work outside their normal work time provided it does not violate any of the local labor code or in-house company rules. The lesser number of affected participants there is, the greater the possibility of holding a virtual session. A more aligned working time of the participants provides a better avenue for arranging a remote workshop.
  15. 15. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 15 13.0 RULES OF ENGAGEMENT 13.1 FACE-TO-FACE COLLABORATION RULES OF ENGAGEMENT • Pass the agenda and the attendance sheet. • Start every session with what the sponsoring organization value most; e.g. safety moment, recital of vision or mission, or a prayer for success. • Start a short round table introduction (Name, Role/Designation, Group/Department, Years of experience in the industry) • Show emergency exit and washrooms. • No texting allowed while in the engagement room. Respectfully step out before texting. • No phones allowed while in the engagement room. Respectfully step out before texting. • Abide by the workshop start and finish time. • Participate actively and ask questions if in doubt. 13.2 REMOTE COLLABORATION RULES OF ENGAGEMENT • Display the agenda on the virtual board. • Everyone shall put the microphone to mute if not speaking. • Start session with what the sponsoring organization value most; e.g. safety moment, recital of vision or mission, or a prayer for success. • Start a short round table introduction (Name, Role/Designation, Group/Department, Years of experience in the industry) • Raise electronic virtual hand to have the virtual floor and speak in a clear voice.
  16. 16. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 16 • Respect the facilitator and other participants by speaking only when called to speak. 14.0 PROCEDURE 14.1 FACE-TO-FACE COLLABORATION PROCEDURE 13.1.1. Send the agenda and the invitation via e-mail to mark the e- calendar as early as possible so everyone can plan and block their calendars. An earlier invitation sets a higher expected participation. 13.1.2. Send facilitation instructions at least two to three weeks ahead of time. 13.1.3. Each participant shall block his calendar in accordance to the face-to-face collaboration schedule. 13.1.4. Set the goal posts from beginning to end. Responsible: Project Director, Project Manager, Engineering Manager/Director, PC Manager, Lead Planner, Project Engineer, or whoever is designated by the Project Manager. This action at the beginning of the workshop will set the objectives and the boundaries. 13.1.5. The facilitator shall identify these milestones three to four weeks before the collaborative workshop. 13.1.6. Inform all participants of the final working goal posts at least two to three weeks before the planning session. 13.1.7. Each participant/discipline shall identify five to fifteen major high-level activities. These are Level 2 activities where future Level 3 activities rollup to. If the participant feels he should have more than fifteen activities, he approaches the facilitator. The
  17. 17. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 17 facilitator assesses the request on a case-to-case basis. Approval will depend on merits. 13.1.8. The participants have to identify the forecast start and/or finish dates of each activity they submit. 13.1.9. The participants have to understand the constraints, assumptions, driving predecessor/s and successor/s of each activity. They should be able to explain the logical sequence and path of the activity chains where it lies. 13.1.10. Each of the participants is encouraged to discuss and interface with the other disciplines/participants before the workshop. 13.1.11. If there are conflicts on dates or sequences affecting own activities and/or activities of other disciplines, it is best to resolve those issues between affected parties before the workshop. 13.1.12. The participants shall submit their list of major Level 2 activities to the facilitator at least five-days ahead of the scheduled collaborative workshop by e-mail. 13.1.13. Each participant shall legibly write down his/her activities on colored stick-on/post-it, size 3” X 3”, using a black marker. Use one stick-on/post-it for each activity. The participant must complete this in advanced of the workshop to expedite the interactive session. Write down the activity attributes. • Short Activity ID • Short Activity Description • Start and/or Finish Dates • Duration (not mandatory at this time)
  18. 18. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 18 Lead Planner will review durations individually with disciplines after the workshop. If the information is available, then it has to be part of the discussion. 13.1.14. Lead Planner will review durations individually with disciplines after the workshop. If the information is available, then it has to be part of the discussion. 13.1.15. Code Key* PR=Process CV=Civil SS=Structural Steel AR=Architectural BG=Building ME=Mechanical MT=Mechanical Heat Tracing PP=Piping ST=Stress EL=Electrical ET=Electric Heat Tracing IN=Instrumentation CS=Control System TE=Telecommunication
  19. 19. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 19 Post-it Nomenclature Sample Post-it (Process)
  20. 20. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 20 Activity ID = PR04 Remaining Duration = 90 days Activity Description = P&ID IFD P&ID IFD = Piping & Instrumentation Diagram Issued for Design Predecessor = PR02 PR02 = Heat and Material Balance Process Flow Diagram Successor = PP03 PP03 = Equipment Layout IFD 13.1.16. The participant/discipline shall observe the assigned color- coding. Each participant will use a different stick-on/post-it color. This arrangement serves as visual aid, so each discipline activities are recognizable from the others even at a distance. 13.1.17. The actual color assignment depends on the availability of the color stick-on. If there are not many colors available at the time of the session, some participants can opt to use the same color. Issue similar color every other discipline listed on the wall timeline so the differentiations are still visible.
  21. 21. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 21 Suggested participant-color distribution: Major Milestones/Goal Posts = Yellow Process=Orange Civil=Violet Structural=Light Violet Mechanical=Red Piping=Light Red Electrical=Pink Instrument=Green Procurement=Light Green OFT/Module=Blue Construction=Light Yellow Commissioning and Start up=Light Blue Regulatory Compliance = Light Orange Remaining participants can repeat existing colors 13.1.18. Participants shall bring their stick-on (post-it) to the workshop. They are ready to stick it on the blank wall timeline anytime. 13.1.19. Review the facilitation instructions and rules of engagement before starting the session on the actual date. 13.1.20. The Facilitator shall post the agreed-to goal posts (Major Milestones) on the blank wall timeline to set the boundaries of the plan/schedule. 13.1.21. Stakeholder participants representing Regulatory Compliance, Project Management Governance, and EH&S can provide their milestones as needed depending on how important they are in the project schedule. These are most likely milestones pointing to Priority 1 Regulatory Compliance Milestone of approvals, Check Point Project Reviews, Environmental, Health and Safety milestones and others.
  22. 22. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 22 13.1.22. After posting the major milestones, following the Agenda for the day, the facilitator will call all the engineering disciplines/participants in the following order to install their post-it activities on the wall timeline. The participant shall explain what each activity is about and what are the reckoning activities, goal posts, durations, and dates are. Process Civil Structural Architectural/Building Mechanical Mechanical Heat Tracing Piping Stress Electrical Electric Heat Tracing Instrumentation 13.1.23. Each time a participant post an activity, the rest of the participants should take the opportunity to raise concerns, make corrections, ask questions, and make suggestions especially activities affecting their own. 13.1.24. The latter can voice his concern when the posted activity will affect his activity or activities directly. The facilitator gives the affected participants to post their own activity or activities in order to show why. 13.1.25. Call Commissioning and Start Up (C&SU) to the engagement floor to provide their start and finish milestones if not yet part of the goal posts. C&SU is welcome to add some high priority System Turnover milestones if available.
  23. 23. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 23 13.1.26. Call Construction representative (disciplines/participants) to post their inputs. Ask them to comment on the viability of the upstream engineering and downstream C&SU activities. 13.1.27. The facilitator shall review the active wall timeline and proceed to review in cascade starting from the very first activity to the left after construction had posted its inputs. 13.1.28. Facilitator can draw the clear relationship lines on the wall timeline between activities as the discussion progresses. 13.1.29. On the last day, the facilitator gives all participants/disciplines last chance to make minor changes (not big ones). It must be a change that can be accommodated by the existing active wall timeline. 13.1.30. After validating all inputs, corrections completed, suggestions heard, the last parking lot and action plan items recorded, the facilitator and the PC Manager declares the wall timeline frozen and the engagement floor closed. 13.1.31. The facilitator with the help of the other group members shall tape the all the post-it together against the paper wall timeline to fix them in place, preventing them from being moved or detaching. Use a transparent scotch tape for this activity. 13.1.32. After taping and securing all post it notes, the facilitator shall take a high-resolution picture of the active wall timeline. The minimum resolution shall not be lower than 2275 pixels X 1520 pixels or 3.5 megapixels.
  24. 24. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 24 File Size Table ( (Urban75, 2012) 13.1.33. Load the pictures to the team’s common folder. 13.1.34. The Lead Planner/Scheduler will use the picture file as reference in developing the final DBM Schedule using Oracle Primavera P6 Project Management or any other scheduling tool of choice. 13.1.35. The Lead Planner/Scheduler on an individual or group basis sets follow-up reviews until the final DBM schedule approved. 14.2 REMOTE COLLABORATION PROCEDURE 13.2.1. Send the agenda and the invitation via e-mail to mark the e- calendar as early as possible so everyone can plan and block their calendars. An earlier invitation sets a higher expected participation. 13.2.2. Send facilitation instructions at least two to three weeks ahead of time.
  25. 25. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 25 13.2.3. Each participant shall block his calendar in accordance to the remote collaboration schedule. 13.2.4. Set the goal posts from beginning to end. Responsible: Project Director, Project Manager, Engineering Manager/Director, PC Manager, Lead Planner, Project Engineer, or whoever is designated by the Project Manager. This action at the beginning of the workshop will set the objectives and the boundaries. 13.2.5. The facilitator shall identify these milestones three to four weeks before the collaborative workshop. 13.2.6. Inform all participants of the final working goal posts two to three weeks before the remote interactive planning session. 13.2.7. The participants have to identify the forecast start and/or finish dates of each activity they submit. 13.2.8. The participants have to understand the constraints, assumptions, driving predecessor/s and successor/s of each activity. They should be able to explain the logical sequence and path of the activity chains where it lies. 13.2.9. Each of the participants is encouraged to discuss and interface with the other disciplines/participants before the workshop. 13.2.10. If there are conflicts on dates or sequences affecting own activities and/or activities of other disciplines, it is best to resolve those issues between affected parties before the remote workshop. 13.2.11. The participants shall input their list of major Level 2 activities straight into the table timeline (see Figure 7), accessible in the common folder. Estimated table timeline entry time should take
  26. 26. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 26 no more than an hour for each participant. The participants can start inputs as soon as they are ready. 13.2.12. If the common document is not available for entry because someone is actively using it, send the form to the Facilitator and he will make the entry in behalf of the participant. 13.2.13. Each participant/discipline shall identify five to fifteen major high-level activities. These are Level 2 activities where future Level 3 activities rollup to. If the participant feels he should have more than fifteen activities, he shall e-mail/call the facilitator. The facilitator assesses the request on a case-to-case basis. Approval will depend on merits. 13.2.14. Never change the format of the form at any time. Only focus on making the entry required. Do not delete someone else entry. 13.2.15. Use the blank field, at the correct column and correct row to enter information. Participants can add rows if necessary. 13.2.16. Notify the facilitator upon completion of entries. 13.2.17. Complete all entries at least one week before the remote interactive session. Write down the activity attributes. • Short Activity ID • Short Activity Description • Start and/or Finish Dates • Duration if available (not mandatory at this time) 13.2.18. If a group remote session is not possible for whatever reasons, the facilitator will call the absent participants to complete the collaborative process.
  27. 27. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 27 13.2.19. Collate all the activities and logically tie them together using a scheduling tool like Primavera. 13.2.20. Send the PDF of the preliminary DBM schedule to the participants/discipline to get the duration inputs and other finishing attributes such as logical sequences, lags, and constraints. 13.2.21. Participants will comment on the printed PDF and send feedbacks to the facilitator. 13.2.22. Facilitator incorporates the instructions/comments and iterates the schedule until acceptably refined for final project management review.
  28. 28. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 28 15.0 APPENDIX Figure 1 - Pre-printed Blank Wall Timeline Figure 2 - Pre-printed Blank Wall Timeline
  29. 29. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 29 Figure 3 - Active Wall Timeline Figure 4 - Design-base Memorandum (Frago, R., 2013)
  30. 30. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 30 Figure 5 – Time Zone Converter (World Clock, 2015) Figure 6 – Push Pins
  31. 31. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 31 PROJECT AB SCHEDULE DEVELOPMENT (Remote Workshop) Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-16 Jan-17 Major Milestones 30% Model Review (A1) 30-Nov-15 1 Start Project 01-Jul-15 All Tier 1 RC Approved 30-Sep-15 Finish Project 31-Jan-17 2 … 15 PROCESS P&ID IFD (A1) 20-Oct-15 LDT IFD (A1) 02-Nov-15 1 P&ID IFD (P/R) 15-Sep-15 … 15 PIPING Last Equipment Layout IFD 01-Sep-15 1 … 15 MECHANICAL Figure 7 – Active Excel Tabulated Timeline
  32. 32. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 32 Figure 8 – Flip Chart Figure 9 – Whiteboard Markers Figure 10 – Masking Tape/Scotch Tape
  33. 33. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 33 Figure 11 – Pen Corrector
  34. 34. D B M S c h e d u l e D e v e l o p m e n t C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k s h o p Page 34 16.0 INDEX activity attributes......................................17 Additional materials ................................10 additional timeframes................................9 agenda...............................................................7 blank field.....................................................26 Blank table timeline.................................11 Code Key........................................................18 collaborative choices..................................2 color distribution ......................................21 combination experience............................3 common document...................................26 conflicts on dates.......................................17 constraints....................................................17 Design-based memorandum...................2 differences in time....................................14 food..................................................................11 integrated execution schedule...............6 Interactive planning....................................7 Introduction....................................................2 list of participants........................................5 OBJECTIVE......................................................3 Participant/discipline................................7 Participants ....................................................3 pre-printed blank timeline......................9 Primavera..................................................... 27 printed PDF ................................................. 27 relationship lines...................................... 23 remote interactive.................................... 25 scheduling fragnets.....................................6 shared folder............................................... 11 stakeholders...................................................3 SUGGESTED FACILITATOR ................ 4, 5 TABLE OF CONTENTS ...............................1 wall timeline ..................................................6 working information..................................5 working time............................................... 14 workshop schedule.................................. 12

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