Course Syllabus
DePaul University
Peace, Justice, and Conflict Studies Program
Spring Quarter 2012
Monday 03/26/2012 to Fr...
2
Oxforud University Press.
4. Steger, Manfred B. & Roy, Ravi K. Neoliberalism: vsi. New York: Oxford University
Press.
5....
3
theory and practice. Boston: MA: Allyn & Bacon.
24. Miller, Barbara. (2011). Cultural anthropology, Sixth Edition. Ch. 1...
4
Chicago State University. (Available online).Zeliger, Craig & Rubenstein, Robert A.
(2009). Building peace: Practical re...
5
Based Holistic
Grading Policy:
whose work demonstrates an extra-ordinary level of competence and distinction. A perfect
...
6
http://rmehs.depaul.edu/emergency/evacuation.asp
Instructional
Strategies:
Brainstorming (B), critical reflection (CR), ...
7
Peace, Globalization; Occupy
Movement, Peace Keeping, Peace
Making, Peace Building. To help
you, we will have some time ...
8
16. Week 4 Conflict Theories: Conflict
Management, Conflict Resolution,
and Conflict Transformation
SO, S, Q, CR, W,
PPT...
9
World War II SO, S, Q, SL PPT Nau Ch 4; Nye 4
The Cold War SO, S, Q, SL PPT Nau Ch 5; Nye 5; Spiegel
Ch 4
Post-Cold War ...
10
3. Organize an event on campus that
deals explicitly with a topic from the
class, with a 6-page max single-
spaced essa...
11
Self, Society, and Modern World (SSMW) Learning Outcomes:
SSMW courses should demonstrate at least one learning outcome...
12
III. Methodology III. Methodology III. Methodology III. Methodology III. Methodology
A. Qualitative
Research Design:
De...
13
Answers to research
questions. A theory
or model is
developed. Provide a
summary table or
figure.
Hypotheses are
confir...
14
accommodations: confidential.
To ensure that you receive the most appropriate reasonable accommodation based on your
ne...
15
Your Name, Your Address, Your Phone, Your email; Dr. Rey Ty, Peace, Justice & Conflict Studies Program,
DePaul Universi...
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Rey Ty. Syllabus for Peace, Justice, and Conflict Studies Syllabus. From International Conflict to Resolution and Peace. Chicago: DePaul University.

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Rey Ty. Syllabus for Peace, Justice, and Conflict Studies Syllabus. From International Conflict to Resolution and Peace. Chicago: DePaul University.

  1. 1. Course Syllabus DePaul University Peace, Justice, and Conflict Studies Program Spring Quarter 2012 Monday 03/26/2012 to Friday 06/08/2012 Basic Information Course Number PAX 210 Course Title From International Conflict to Resolution and Peace Professor Dr. Rey Ty Days and Time Wednesdays 4:20-5:50 PM Office TBA Classroom Fullerton TBA Email rtdpu@gmail.com Office 2352 North Clifton Avenue, Suite 150.25, Chicago, IL 60614 Office Hours Before and after class and by appointment only. Plan to discuss your issues and concerns before and after class with the professor. Do *not* rely on email communications only, as there is no guarantee that I will receive them or that they will be replied in a timely manner. Learning Contract Course Description: This course is an interdisciplinary inquiry that investigates the nature of social and political conflict; identify the structural and recurring causes of violence; devise and assess potential approaches to armed conflict and systemic oppression; and explore the possibilities of justice, coexistence, and reconciliation. This course examines the origin, nature, and consequences of conflict and peace. It investigates the systemic, interstate, domestic, economic, class, social, economic, ideological, idiosyncratic, and other factors that provide the reasons for which conflicts arise in different contexts. In addition to a foundational survey of the peace studies discipline, this course investigates several of its primary components, including international theory, the theoretical and historical origins of peace studies, conflict resolution and conflict transformation, mediation, nonviolence, interfaith dialogue, and reconciliation. Literature used come from political science, sociology, anthropology, economics, psychology, education, history, business, communication, religious studies, and the humanities. Students will engage critically, creatively, and collaboratively with texts, writing assignments, discussions, and a final project of their choice. Course Objectives: This course examines the issues of conflict and conflict resolution, of war and peace, in the modern world. As such, it intends: 1. to examine the nature, origins, and contexts of conflict and war; 2. to examine the multiple approaches for promoting conflict resolution and peace; 3. to examine some of the theoretical frameworks concerning conflict and conflict- resolution; 4. to assess these frameworks on the basis of evidence and argument, as well as to place them within the critical literature and apply them to real-world circumstances; 5. to investigate and assess/evaluate the nature of conflict and conflict resolution in terms of ethical and cultural frameworks, and across various social and political contexts; and 6. to provide opportunities to deliberate on & discuss the purposes and goals of conflict resolution. Required Readings: 1. Barash, David P. (Ed.). (2009). Approaches to peace: A reader in peace studies. New York: Oxford University Press. 2. Lamy, Steven L., John S. Masker, John Baylis, Steve Smith, & Patricia Owens. (2011). Introduction to global politics: Brief edition New York: Oxford University Press. Discussing international conflicts and cooperation, this book provides a thematic approach, theoretical foundations, historical context, and analysis of world events. 3. Steger, Manfred B. (2003). Globalization: Very short introduction (vsi). New York:
  2. 2. 2 Oxforud University Press. 4. Steger, Manfred B. & Roy, Ravi K. Neoliberalism: vsi. New York: Oxford University Press. 5. Townshend, Charles. (2011). Terrorism: vsi. New York: Oxforud University Press. Supplementary Readings: 1. Abigail, Ruth Anna & Cahn, Dudley D. (2011). Managing conflict through communication. 4th Ed. Boston: MA: Allyn & Bacon. 2. Barash, David, & Webel, Charles P. (2009). Peace and conflict studies.. 2nd Ed. Los Angeles: Sage. The focus is on war, peace, reasons for war, building negative peace, and building positive peace. 3. Bova, Russell. (2012). How the world works: A brief survey of international relations, 2/E. Longman. 4. Chomsky, N. & Foucault, M. The Chomsky-Foucault debate: On human nature. 5. Coltri, Laurie S. (2010). Alternative dispute resolution: A conflict diagnosis approach. 2nd Ed. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall. 6. Coursier, Henri. (1962). Course of five lessons on the Geneva Conventions. Geneva: International Committee of the Red Cross. 7. Corvette, Barbara A Budjac. (2007). Conflict management: A practical guide to developing negotiation Strategies. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall. 8. Danziger, James N. (2011). ―Political violence,‖ Chapter 12. Understanding the political world: Acomparative introduction to political ccience, 10/E. Longman. 9. Diamond L. & Ambassador McDonald, J. (1996). Multi-Track Diplomacy: A Systems Approach to Peace. Kumarian Press. 10. Ember, Carol R. & Melvin R. Ember. (2011). Cultural anthropology, 13/E. Ch 14. Pearson. 11. Farmer, P. (2009). Three Stories, Three Paradigms, and a Critique. http://www.pbs.org/now/shows/537/Shifting-Power-Dynamics.pdf 12. Galtung, J. (1969). Violence, peace and peace research. Journal of Peace Research, 6(3), 167-191. 13. Goldstein, J. & Pevehouse, J. C. International relations. 10th Ed. New York: Pearson. The focus is on tools of analysis, international security and international political economy. 14. International Committee of the Red Cross. (2012). State Parties to the Following International Humanitarian Law and Other Related Treaties as of 1-Mar-2012. List of Ratification to International Humanitarian Law, including The Geneva Conventions, their Additional Protocols, as well as the Commentaries, and other international and regional IHL conventions. Geneva: International Committee of the Red Cross. http://www.icrc.org/ihl 15. International Committee of the Red Cross. (2005 & 1977). Additional Protocols. Geneva: International Committee of the Red Cross. 16. International Committee of the Red Cross. (2002). IHL: Answers to your questions. This book discusses humanitarian law and the protection of war victims, as well as other topics. Geneva: International Committee of the Red Cross. http://www.icrc.org/eng/resources/documents/publication/p0703.htm 17. International Committee of the Red Cross. (1988). Basic Rules of the Geneva Conventions and their Additional Protocols. Geneva: International Committee of the Red Cross. http://www.icrc.org/eng/resources/documents/publication/p0365.htm 18. International Committee of the Red Cross. (1949). Four Geneva Conventions. Geneva: International Committee of the Red Cross. 19. Lederach, J. P. (2003). The little book of conflict transformation. PA: Good Book. 20. Lederach, J. P. (2005). The moral imagination: The art and soul of building peace. Oxford & New York: Oxford University Press. 21. Louv, Richard. NEVER SAY ―HELP‖. Leadership that Instills the Values of Personal and Community Responsibility. http://www.leadershipforchange.org/insights/conversation/files/Essay1.pdf 22. Macionis, John J. (2012). Chs 9 & 17. Sociology, 14/E. Pearson. 23. McCorkle, Suzanne & Reese, Melanie J . (2010). Personal conflict management:
  3. 3. 3 theory and practice. Boston: MA: Allyn & Bacon. 24. Miller, Barbara. (2011). Cultural anthropology, Sixth Edition. Ch. 10. Pearson. 25. Nau, Henry R. Perspectives on international relations. 3rd Ed. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press. Consistently using the realist, liberal, identity, and critical perspectives, this book focuses on wars, development issues, and global forces for change. 26. Henslin, James M. (2012). Chs. 8 & 21. Sociology: A down-to-earth approach, 11/E. Pearson. 27. Nye, J. Jr. (2013). Understanding Global Conflicts: An Introduction to Theory and History, 9th Edition. Pearson Longman. 28. Pictet, Jean. (1985). Development and principles of international humanitarian law. Geneva: Martinus Nijhoff & Henry Dunant Institute. http://books.google.com/books/about/Development_and_principles_of_internatio.html ?id=KVWxvUxy4YMC 29. Pictet, Jean. (1975). Humanitarian law and the protection of war victims. Geneva: Henry Dunant Institute. 30. Pictet, Jean. (1967). Principles of international humanitarian law. Geneva: International Committee of the Red Cross. http://books.google.com/books/about/The_principles_of_international_humanita.html? id=Yz8_AQAAIAAJ 31. Roskin, Michael G. & Berry, Nicholas O. (2012). IR: The New world of international relations, 9/E. Longman. 32. Roskin, Michael G., Robert L. Cord, James A. Medeiros, & Walter S. Jones. (2011). ―Political Violence,‖ Chapter 17. Political science: An introduction, 12/E. Longman. 33. Russell, S. & Ty, R. (2010). Conflict transformation efforts in the southern Philippines. In C. Carter (Ed.). Conflict resolution and peace education: Transformation across disciplines, pp. 157-186. New York: Pallgrave McMillan. (PDF file available) 34. Sassòli, Marco, Bouvier, Antoine A., & Quintin, Anne. (2011). How does law protect in war? Cases, documents and teaching materials on contemporary practice in international humanitarian law. Geneva: International Committee of the Red Cross. 35. Schirch, L. (2004). The little book of strategic peace building. Good Books. 36. Sharp, Gene. (1993). From dictatorship to democracy: A conceptual framework for liberation. Available at http://www.aeinstein.org/organizations/org/FDTD.pdf 37. Spiegel, Steven, Elizabeth Matthews, Jennifer Taw & Kristen Williams. (2011). World politics in a new era. New York & Oxford: Oxford University Press. 38. Spradley, James & McCurdy, David W. (2012). Conformity and conflict: Readings in cultural anthropology. 14th Ed. Part 7, Ch 25. Pearson. 39. Turner, Jonathan H. (2006). Chs. 9, 22, 23. Sociology. Pearson. 40. Ty, R. (2011). Social Injustice, Human Rights Based Education, and Citizens’ Direct Action to Promote Social Transformation in the Philippines. In Education, Citizenship and Social Justice, 6(3), 205-211. 41. Ty, R. (2010 December). Indigenous Peoples in the Philippines: Continuing Struggle. Focus Asia-Pacific, 62, 6-9. Osaka, Japan: HuRights. 42. Ty, R. (2010). Youth and Adult Education for Social Change in the Philippines: Linking Education with NGOs, Social Movements and Civil Society Linking Education with NGOs, Social Movements and Civil Society. In Human Rights Education in Asia-Pacific, Vol. I. Osaka: Hurights Osaka (Asia-Pacific Human rights Information Center). 43. Ty, R. (2009). Where have all the indigenous peoples gone? A participatory action research: Embracing the moment to act in a time of change. Proceedings of the Midwest Research to Practice Conference. Chicago: Northeastern Illinois University. (Available online). 44. Ty, R., Alkarzon, A., & Hunting, E. (2010). Islam: Misconceptions, current trends, and the role of social movements and education in promoting development, conflict transformation and peace building. (Available online). 45. Ty, R. & Alonto, A. (2007). Intra-faith dialogue: The missing link in interfaith dialogue. Proceedings of the African American Latino(a) Conference. Chicago:
  4. 4. 4 Chicago State University. (Available online).Zeliger, Craig & Rubenstein, Robert A. (2009). Building peace: Practical reflections from the field. Sterling, VA: Kumarian Press. Online Resources: 1. Peace and Development Essential Books: http://www.internationalpeaceandconflict.org/profiles/blogs/essential-books-in-the- field 2. Conflict Transformation and Resolution Resources: http://www.cmu.ca/library/CTSCRS.php Free Electronic Books Open Access Publications at: http://humanrightssocialjusticepeace.blogspot.com/search/label/Books Educational Videos: Type ―reyty2‖ + ―theme‖ (such as ―peace‖) to access the publicly available videos online, many of which are summaries of academic literature and research Class Decorum: Mutual respect; safe zone; zero tolerance; no bullying; don’t share any information you do not want to; no put downs; no invectives; no expletives; use inclusive & non-sexist language; two tardies equal one absence; remain in class for the entire session or else be considered absent; be polite; alright to disagree but do not attack the person; no sleeping; turn off *all* electronic devices; no cell phones; no laptop computer; no distracting side conversations; no Sudoku, crossword puzzle, and other games allowed; no MP3 players; no texting; no reading of newspaper, magazines or any other reading materials not used in this class; no sit-ins; no babies and children in the classroom. If the university permits, food & drinks are allowed but please clean up after yourselves. Everyone has an equal chance to speak out around the table; hence, no ―super nova,‖ no ―ping pong,‖ and no ―popcorn.‖ Don't Miss the Forest for the Trees: Reading materials both answer and raise questions. The professor will not have all the answers. This course will *not* describe in full details historical and current events, recording facts, figures, days and dates during which certain events took place. You will *not* be committed to memorizing facts and figures, which you will soon forget after the academic term ends. We will attempt to see the bigger picture and not get caught up in the minute details. Students will be exposed to analytical framework, theories, and concepts which will help you develop your own answers and which you will remember long after you leave the university. Class Participation: The professor acts as a facilitator. As students are responsible for active learning and participation, they must come to class having read the reading materials. In alphabetical order and on rotation basis, each student will lead team-building activities at the start of each class session. You have to come to class having done the reading in advance and to participate actively and substantively in discussion. Questions to guide you in your readings: (a) What are the central problems, debates, and questions? (b) What are the key arguments? (c) What is the evidence for the arguments? (d) What are the problems with the argument? (e) What are your counter-arguments? (f) Why did the readings clarify or confuse? (g) How did this reading material compare to other reading materials? (h) Do you have any relevant experiences related to the readings? (i) What questions does the reading material raise? Absence and Dropping Policy: Mandatory attendance. You may be excused from class for religious observances but I need to have at least 48-hour notice. Two absences result in a letter grade deduction, significantly lowering your final grade, for example, from A (no absence) to B (absence). Three unexcused absences amount to failing the course. In terms of dropping from the course due to absences, we will follow the university’s policy, for which the students are responsible. You are responsible for dropping from this class by the official deadline date. Personal and Family Emergencies: Absence due to personal medical reasons and death in the immediate family are the only valid excuses. Please bring medical certification or death certification, respectively. Let me know of your personal and family emergencies so that you may be excused from some of the class policies. A note from the hospital, for example, duly signed by the authorities must be submitted to me. Withdrawal Policy: The student is responsible for keeping track of the university’s withdrawal deadline. If you choose to stop attending class you are responsible for withdrawing from the course. I will not do so for you. If you stop attending and have not withdrawn, a failing grade will be entered. Submission: Late submission is not accepted and gets zero (0) point for that specific requirement. Standards- An ―A‖ indicates an excellent and exceptional performance. This grade is reserved for students
  5. 5. 5 Based Holistic Grading Policy: whose work demonstrates an extra-ordinary level of competence and distinction. A perfect attendance record is a necessary but not sufficient criterion of excellence. A student who regularly or always reads all the assigned materials before class meetings and volunteers accurate comments and responds correctly to direct questions posed to him/her or the class, will meet this standard. ―B‖ is assigned to a satisfactory performance of an assigned task. This grade indicates that no new insight has been added, and that the student’s performance is above average. ―C‖ indicates an average performance by a student. This grade usually indicates that a student barely met the requirements of a task and needs to work harder. Very few students get a ―D‖, which indicates a less than satisfactory (i.e. below average) performance of tasks, and even fewer students obtain an ―F‖, which indicates a failure to perform up to the minimum level of expectation. Pluses (+) and minuses (-) are used to indicate better or lesser performance levels between the grades. Students whose performance falls consistently at or below ―C‖ average should contact me early on to find ways of addressing possible problems of comprehension, interpretation and writing. Breakdown of Point Distribution for Course Requirements: ITEMS BREAKDOWN YOUR SCORE 1. Mid-Term Comprehensive Exam 200 points 2. 6-Page Max 12-point Times New Roman Single-Spaced APA Academic Research Paper & PPT Presentation (one whole grade point deduction for additional word/s on a 7th page; e.g. grade of A becomes B) 100 points 3. 6-Page Max TNR Single-Spaced APA Final Reflection Paper, Creative PPT/Video Production & Presentation based on Social Action, Ethnographic Immersion, or Job Shadowing, Interview, and Critical Reflection (7th page gets one whole grade point deduction) 100 points 4. Class Participation and Attendance 50 points 5. Diagnostic Pre-Test and Post-Test 50 points 6. Extra Credits (Bonus) (Max 50 points) Total 500 (+50) points Grading System: Raw Score Percentage Quality Letter Grade 476-500 98-100% Excellent A 446-475 95-97% Very Good A- 426-445 93-94% Good B+ 396-425 90-92% Satisfactory B 376-395 88-89% Satisfactory B- 346-375 85-87% Average C+ 326-345 83-84% Average C 296-325 80-82% Average C- 276-295 78-79% Less Than Satisfactory D+ 250-275 75-77% Passing D 0-249 50-74% Fail F Extra Credits: All students will have the same chances to work on a project for extra credits. Talk to me immediately if you want to work on a project, which needs my approval. Phone Tree: For valid tardiness or class cancellations due to inclement weather or traffic conditions, please call and notify the person after your name is listed. Disclaimer: Test schedules, class schedules, and reading assignments are all subject to change with notification to students attending class. We will follow the follow of our course outline. Some topics might need less or more time; hence, adjustments will be made accordingly. Students will be notified of changes in class and online. Guest lecturers will come when available. Citation Format APA http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/ Emergency Emergency Evacuation Policy and Procedures
  6. 6. 6 http://rmehs.depaul.edu/emergency/evacuation.asp Instructional Strategies: Brainstorming (B), critical reflection (CR), current events (CE) from New York Times, energizer (E), guest speakers (GS—scheduled based on their availability), learning circle (LC), lecture-discussion (LD), PowerPoint presentations (PPT), questions (Q), research paper workshop (RPW), snap poll (SP), speak out (SO), student-led (SL), summary (S), video showing (V), workshop (W) Learning Strategies: Visual, Auditory, Kinesthetic, Reading-Writing Preference (VARK), Concrete Experience, Active Experimentation, Reflective Observation, Abstract Conceptualization (Kolb) Writing Help: For help with organizing your ideas, grammar, citing sources, avoiding plagiarism, sample SNL assignments and much more, see the Writing Guide for SNL Students at http://snl.depaul.edu/writing/index.html. For on-campus and online tutoring, see the DePaul University Writing Centers at http://condor.depaul.edu/~writing/. Course Outline, Schedule, Strategies, and Readings Tuesdays & Thursdays, 4:20 PM – 5:50 PM (Spring Quarter runs from Monday March 26, 2012 through Exam Week Friday June 8, 2012) *I request the library for e-reserved copies for readings coded in green. Figure 1: Course Overview: Ever-Changing Realities, Theories, and Knowledge Construction of Conflict and Peace Hour & Session Date Topic Strategy Readings & Materials PART I: Peace Studies: What Is Peace? Negative Peace? Positive Peace? 1. Week 1 Diagnostic Pre-Test & Introduction: Self-Introductions, Learning Styles, Expectation Check, Career Options, Ground Rules, Learning Contract, Syllabus, Intellectual Development & Maturity; Good Writing; Writing Academic Papers; Student Leaders of the Day in alphabetical order (news, summary, teambuilding activities, etc.) LC, LD, PPT, V; Permanent Seating Plan with Photo ID for attendance sheet; Phone tree Syllabus, Perry on Intellectual Development; Hegel on Dialectics; submit pre-test online 2. Week1 Contextual Analysis of International Conflicts: An International Situation B, CR, W CE 3. Week 1 Peace Studies, Peace, Structural Violence; Negative Peace, Positive SO, S, Q, CE, LD, W, CR, PPT Barash, Chs 2 & 4; Barash & Webel Chs 1 &
  7. 7. 7 Peace, Globalization; Occupy Movement, Peace Keeping, Peace Making, Peace Building. To help you, we will have some time for a research paper Q & A and workshop every meeting. 10; Galtung (1969); Goldstein Ch 3; Nye, 7; Schirch; Steger vsi book; Zeliger & Rubenstein Ch 1 4. Week 1 Enduring Logic of Conflict in World Politics: Anarchy and Order; Conflict and Cooperation LD, CR, Q, PPT Nye, Ch 1 & 2; Spiegel Ch 1 Part II: International Theories: What Are the Different Ways by which to View the World? 5. Week 2 Levels of Analysis: Psychological, Individual, Interpersonal, Bureaucratic, Organizational, Domestic (or Political or State), Systemic (or Social), and Global Causes of Conflict and Peace SO, S, Q, PPT Barash & Webel, Chs 5- 9; Bova, Ch 3; Goldstein Ch 1; Lamy, Ch 4; Nau, Intro & Ch 1; Nye, Ch 1; Spiegel Ch 2 6. Week 2 Realist Perspective of Conflict and Peace SO, S, Q, CE, LD, W, CR, PPT Barash, Ch 2; Berry Ch 1; Berry Ch 1; Bova Ch 4; Goldstein Ch 2; Nau, Intro & Ch 1; Roskin & Spiegel Ch 2 7. Week 2 Liberal Perspective of Conflict and Peace SO, S, Q, CE, LD, W, CR, PPT Bova Ch 5; Goldstein Ch 3; Lamy Ch5; Nau, Intro & Ch 1; Spiegel Ch 2 8. Week 2 Identity and Social Perspectives of Conflict and Peace: Identity & Constructivism, Marxism, Critical Theory, Post-Modernism, Post- Structuralism, Feminism, Deconstructionism, etc. SO, S, Q, CE, LD, W, CR, PPT Goldstein Ch 3; Nau, Ch 1; Spiegel Ch 2 9. Week 2 Review of Contending Theories PPT, Q&A Bova Ch 1; Lamy Ch 3; Nau Ch 1; Roskin & Berry Ch 2; Spiegel Ch 2 PART III: Concept, Causes, History, and Changing Nature of International Conflicts & Security 10. Week 3 Political Violence: Causes & Types of Conflicts and War LD, PPT Barash & Webel Ch 2-4; Danziger Ch 12; Goldstein Ch 5-6; Roskin & Berry Ch 12 & 15; Roskin, Cord, Medeiros, & Jones Ch 17; Turner Ch 23 11. Week 3 Overview of the Evolving International System: Continuity & Change in History; The Two World Wars, The Cold War, and the Post- Cold War Era LD, PPT Bova, Ch. 2; Goldstein, Ch 1 12. Week 3 National Security, Global Security, Military Power, and Terrorism LD, PPT Lamy Ch 6; Roskin & Berry Ch 13; Spiegel Chs 7 & 8 13. Week 3 Politics of Nuclear Bombs LD, PPT Lamy Ch 6; Roskin & Berry Ch 14 14. Week 3 Terrorism LD, PPT Townshend, Lamy Ch 6 15. Week 3 Human Security LD, PPT Lamy, pp. 218-221 PART IV. Conflict Transformation, Resolution, Human Rights, International Humanitarian Law, and Social Justice
  8. 8. 8 16. Week 4 Conflict Theories: Conflict Management, Conflict Resolution, and Conflict Transformation SO, S, Q, CR, W, PPT Barash & Webel, Ch 11 & 20 17. Week 4 The Moral Imagination: The Art and Soul of Building Peace Lederach, Preface & Ch 1 18. Week 4 Anthropological Perspectives of Political Life, Social Control, Conformity, Conflicts, Violence and Conflict Resolution LD, V, PPT Coleman & Watson; Ember & Ember Ch 14; Harris & Johnson; Miller Ch 10; Scupin & Decorse; Spradley & McCurdy Part 7 Ch 25; Turner Ch 9 19. Week 4 Sociological Perspectives of Social Control and Conflict LD, V, PPT Henslin Ch 8; Macionis Ch 9 20. Global Governance and International Law: Human Needs vs. Human Rights-Based Approach; Positive Peace, International Law, International Organizations, International Human Rights SO, S, Q, GS, PPT Amnesty International, Barash, Ch 3; Barash & Webel, Ch 17-19; Berry Ch 20; Bova Ch 6; Goldstein Ch 7; Lamy Ch 7; Spiegel Ch 13; Roskin & United Nations 21. Week 5 Conflicts and International Humanitarian Law: Humane Law and the Laws of War LD, V, GS, PPT International Committee of the Red Cross; ICRC (as listed); Coursier (1962); Pictet (1985; 1975; 1967); Sassòli (2011) 22. Week 5 Power, Justice, and Change SO, S, Q, PPT PPT Lecture on Foucault and Chomsky 23. Week 6 Role of Intellectuals, Civil Society, Non-Governmental Organizations, Social Movements, peace movements; and the State SO, S, Q, PPT Barash Ch 7; Barash & Webel, Ch 10; Henslin Ch 21; Macionis Ch 17; Turner Ch 22; PPT Lecture on Chomsky, Clark (1991); Foucault; Goldstein; Gramsci; Hobbes, Locke & Rousseau; Korten (1990); Louv; Migdal. Nau. Said; Sartre 24. Week 6 Models of Conflict Transformation and Peace Building; Case Studies: Islam & Muslims; Interfaith & Intra- faith Muslim-Christian-Indigenous Relations in the Philippines SO, S, Q, CE, LD, W, CR, PPT Farmer; Sharp; Russell & Ty; Ty, Alkarzon & Hinting; Ty & Alonto 25. Week 7 Research Paper Workshop Case Study: Indigenous Peoples in the Philippines SO, S, Q, PPT Ty (IP) 26. Week 7 Mid-Term Comprehensive Exam; Sample & review questions will be provided Multiple Choice & Matching Type Bring pencils and erasers PART V: Final Projects: Student Presentations of Case Studies of Their Own Choices 27. Week 8 The Evolving International System: Continuity & Change in History SO, S, Q, SL PPT Bova Ch 2; Nau Ch 2; Nye 3 World War I SO, S, Q, SL PPT Lamy, Ch 2; Nau Ch 3; Nye 3
  9. 9. 9 World War II SO, S, Q, SL PPT Nau Ch 4; Nye 4 The Cold War SO, S, Q, SL PPT Nau Ch 5; Nye 5; Spiegel Ch 4 Post-Cold War Era SO, S, Q, SL PPT Nau Ch 6; Nye 6; Spiegel Ch 6 Terrorism and the World after 9/11 SO, S, Q, SL PPT Nau Ch 7 28. Week 8 Research Paper Workshop Case Study: Cyprus, Sri Lanka SO, S, Q, Video; Guest Speakers Ty (Cyprus) 29. Week 9 From Colonialism to Decolonization SO, S, Q, SL PPT Roskin & Berry Ch 7; Spiegel Ch 5 Asia Case-Study Presentations & Submission of 10-page paper (students in alphabetical order), hardcopy & electronic copy: Afghanistan, Bougainville, Burma, East Timor, Iran, Iraq, Israel- Palestine, Kashmir, Kurds, Nepal, Philippines, Sri Lanka SO, S, Q, SL PPT Presentations Vietnam and the Warping of National Interest Roskin & Berry Ch 4 West Asia & North Africa (aka “Middle East”): Eternal Warfare in the Holy Land Roskin & Berry Ch 8 Arab Spring (Tunisia, Egypt, Syria, Yemen, etc.), Latest journal articles & current events news Oil and Turmoil in the Persian Gulf Roskin & Berry Ch 9 30. Week 9 Occupy Movement Case-Study Presentations & Submission: movement as a whole, U.S., Europe & elsewhere SO, S, Q, SL PPT Presentations Africa Case-Study Presentations & Submission: Eritrea, Rwanda, Somalia, Sudan, South Africa SO, S, Q, SL PPT Presentations 31. Week 9 Latin America Case-Study Presentations & Submission: Chile, Colombia, Nicaragua, Peru; plight of the undocumented migrant laborers SO, S, Q, SL PPT Presentations Trouble and Hope in Latin America Roskin & Berry Ch 10 32. Week 9 Europe Case-Study Presentations & Submission: Bosnia and Hercegovina, Chechnya, Kosovo SO, S, Q, SL PPT Presentations 33. Week 10 Social Action: Exposure, Immersion, and Engaged Learning. Submit hardcopy signed Site Learning/Serving Form in class, if necessary. 1. Organize, document, and analyze (6-page max single-spaced) event(s) addressing topics from the class 2. Produce an original work of art – accompanied by 6-page max single- spaced artist’s statement, examining a topic from the class. LD, SO, S, Q, V; for interviews, photos & videos, prepare a consent form for approval & signature Class vote (members present): DPU-wide Class Project (PAX 210 initiated & co-sponsored conference on a T or Th) or Individual Field Visit for Community Assessment
  10. 10. 10 3. Organize an event on campus that deals explicitly with a topic from the class, with a 6-page max single- spaced essay reflecting on the experience. 4. Participate in peace or social justice activism in Chicago and writing 6-page max single-spaced essay chronicling, analyzing, & interpreting these experiences. 6. Conduct and document (6-page max single spaced) an oral history project related to a theme from the class. 34. Week 10 Sharing of Social Action Experience (Whole Class Activity or Individual Projects) SO, S, Q, SL (PPT, Photos, Video, 6- page single-spaced max Paper) Edited video presentation and plenary discussion for the whole-class project. Or, for individual projects: Five minute-max self-explanatory videos each. 1 whole point deduction for videos 5 minutes & 1 second or more (e.g. grade from A to B) 35. Week 11 Post-Test: Final Reflection, Synthesis, Debriefing, Personal Pledge of Commitment, Post-Test Survey, and non-graded formal university evaluation SO, S, Q Individual students’ statement of commitment and integrative model or concept map; online impact assessment survey; official university evaluation Figure 2: Course Content Summary: Ever-Changing Realities, Theories, and Knowledge Construction of Conflict and Peace
  11. 11. 11 Self, Society, and Modern World (SSMW) Learning Outcomes: SSMW courses should demonstrate at least one learning outcome in each category. Substantive learning outcomes: This course emphasizes the third outcome: 1. Students will use the constructs of power, diversity, and/or culture to describe examples of where, why and how inequities exists in modern society. 2. Students will be able to frame a theory about the relationship between individuals and modern society. 3. Students will be able to analyze the impact of at least one political, social, or economic institution or social structure on society. Methodological & critical thinking learning outcomes: This course emphasizes the second outcome: 1. Students will be able to articulate an argument based on theory and empirical evidence regarding the modern world. 2. Students will be able to analyze critically research and arguments about the modern world. Personal/ reflective learning outcomes: This course emphasizes both outcomes: 1. Students will be able to reflect, in writing, upon their role in the modern world, including their relationship to their own and/or other communities. 2. Students will be able to analyze social problems and public policies on the basis of ethics and values. SSMW writing expectations: Students in SSMW Learning Domain courses will demonstrate that they have mastered one or more of the learning outcomes through writing. It is expected that the equivalent of ten pages (which may be distributed across a series of assignments including papers, exams, journals, problem-sets and in-class writing assignments) will be required. At least five of those pages must be written outside class. Rubric for Academic Research and Presentation (See Educational Videos for Sample Research Papers) Qualitative Research Quantitative Research Historical Research Philosophical Research Theoretical Research Make sure there’s congruence! Make sure there’s congruence! Make sure there’s congruence! Make sure there’s congruence! Make sure there’s congruence! One paragraph abstract One paragraph abstract One paragraph abstract One paragraph abstract One paragraph abstract I. Introduction I. Introduction I. Introduction I. Introduction I. Introduction A. Problem or Issue A. Problem A. Problem A. Problem A. Problem B. Research Questions (What) B. Research Hypotheses (Why) B. Research Questions (What) B. Research Questions (What) B. Research Questions (What) C. Objective C. Purpose C. Objective C. Objective C. Objective D. Perspective: Symbolic Interactionism, Structural Functionalism, Conflict D. Theoretical Framework D. Theoretical Framework D. Perspective: Non- Western, Classical, Modern, Post-Modern, Post-colonial, Feminist D. Perspectives: e.g. Realist, Liberal, Marxist, Critical, Critical Race, Feminist, Postmodern E Key Terms E Key Terms E Key Terms E. Definition of Terms E Key Terms II. Literature Review II. Literature Review II. Literature Review II. Literature Review II. Literature Review Note: For your key terms and literature review: *Quote* latest contending definitions and theories of key terms from primary sources: peace (p. building, p. keeping, and p. making) and conflict (conflict resolution, c. transformation, and c. resolution).
  12. 12. 12 III. Methodology III. Methodology III. Methodology III. Methodology III. Methodology A. Qualitative Research Design: Descriptive Non- Experimental Design: Ethnography, Case Study, Multi-Site Studies A. Quantitative Research Design: Experimental Design, Quasi- Experimental Design or Correlational Design A. Historical Research Design A. Research Design: Philosophical Inquiry: Dialectics, Post- Structuralism, Deconstruction A. Qualitative Research Design: Descriptive Non- Experimental Design: B. Data Collection Methods: Participant Observation, Interview, Focus Groups, Recordings, Archival Document Search and Analysis, Artifacts, Triangulation B. Data Collection Methods: Survey, Tests, Secondary Data, Comparative Statistical Analysis B. Data Collection: Document Analysis B. Data Collection: Document Analysis B. Data Collection: Document Analysis C. Data Analysis: 1. Ground Theory Approach: Coding, Patterns, Interpretation 2. Or Phenomenological Approach: Discover Essence of Experience 3. Or Ethnographic Approach: Focus on cultural behavior of groups 4. Or Narrative Analysis: Study stories to find out how people make sense of the world 5. Or Discourse analysis: Study speech to find out the underlying social and ideological influences C. Data Analysis: Graphs, Charts, Tables C. Data Analysis C. Data Analysis: Classification, Deconstruction C. Data Analysis: Analysis, Critique, and Synthesis IV. Findings and Discussion: Questions are inductively answered IV. Analysis and Interpretation: Hypotheses are deductively confirmed or refuted IV. Body : Origin, Development, Problems, and Future Prospects; or Contending Perspectives IV. Body : Arguments, (Analysis) Counter- Arguments (Antithesis), Production of New Philosophical Knowledge (Synthesis) IV. Body : Arguments, (Analysis) Counter- Arguments (Antithesis), Production of New Philosophical Knowledge (Synthesis) V. Conclusion V. Conclusion V. Conclusion V. Conclusion V. Conclusion A. Summary: A. Summary A. Summary and A. Summary and A. Summary and
  13. 13. 13 Answers to research questions. A theory or model is developed. Provide a summary table or figure. Hypotheses are confirmed or refuted. Provide a summary table or figure. Critique. Provide a summary table or figure. Critique. Provide a summary table or figure. Critique. Provide a summary table or figure. B. Implications for future research B. Implications for future research B. Implications for future research B. Implications for future research B. Implications for future research C. Implications to theory or social practice C. Implications to theory or social practice C. Implications to theory or social practice C. Implications to theory or social practice C. Implications to theory or social practice D. Implications to policy D. Implications to policy D. Implications to policy D. Implications to policy D. Implications to policy References References References References References Note: References must be academic or professional journal articles or books. They must not be more than five years old, except for seminal work (e.g. Galtung and United Nations instruments) and except for statistical updates (newspapers). You must use at least five academic sources, such as academic journals and textbooks, not counting seminal work and statistical updates. Correctly and consistently use APA citation format. The research paper will be typed in Word format, 12-point Times New Roman font, six pages maximum, single spaced, including references. Observe standard margins (1" on sides and bottom and 1-1/2" on top of page). Submit hardcopy to me in class and the digital copy as an attachment in an email. Each paper will be graded based on demonstrated proficiency with the topic; integrity and quality of research; depth and originality of analysis; clarity in organization and writing; mechanics (grammar, spelling, punctuation, references, etc.), and preparedness for the research paper workshop and the research paper presentation. All papers will be published in one electronic book (e-book) & will be available online. Sample research papers can be found at: http://www.lindenwood.edu/mwr2p/docs/papers/Beltran-FigueroaTy.pdf https://www.msu.edu/~mwr2p/TyAl-KarzonHunting-MR2P-2010.pdf https://www.msu.edu/~mwr2p/Ty1-MR2P-2010.pdf http://www.umsl.edu/continuinged/education/mwr2p06/pdfs/B/Ty_GABRIELA.pdf Sample Integrative Congruence Chart for Academic Research Problems Questions Objectives Findings Recommendation a) Little discussion on A What is A? To describe A A is X + Y Include A in studies b) No information on B What is B? To discover B B affects Z Need to conduct research on B c) No one is doing C What is C? To explain C C is accidental Replicate research to see if C is always only accidental Statement on academic integrity: Check the university website for the complete statement on academic integrity. (http://academicintegrity.depaul.edu/Resources/Students/index.html) The significant passage is the preamble: ―DePaul University is a learning community that fosters the pursuit of knowledge and the transmission of ideas within a context that emphasizes a sense of responsibility for oneself, for others and for society at large. To preserve the quality of education offered to students, the university is responsible for maintaining academic integrity and protecting all those who depend on it, including DePaul’s community partners and institutional affiliates. Violations of academic integrity, in any of their forms, are, therefore, detrimental to the values of DePaul, to the students' own development as responsible members of society, to the pursuit of knowledge, and to the transmission of ideas. All members of the university community share the responsibility for creating conditions that support academic integrity.‖ (http://academicintegrity.depaul.edu/AcademicIntegrityPolicy.pdf) Statement on academic Students who feel they may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact me privately to discuss their specific needs. All discussions will remain
  14. 14. 14 accommodations: confidential. To ensure that you receive the most appropriate reasonable accommodation based on your needs, contact me as early as possible in the quarter (preferably within the first week of class), and make sure that you have contacted the: - The PLuS Program (for LD, AD/HD) at 773-325-1677, Student Center #370, and/or - The Office for Students with Disabilities (for all other disabilities) at 773-325-1677, Student Center #370 Sample Consent Form for Field Research Dealing with One International Conflict, Justice and Peace Issue ADULT (18 or older) I am at least eighteen years old. I am publicly known for my work with a non-governmental organization; hence, I am invited to take part in this research. I am aware that my participation is voluntary and I am free to participate in the research project titled ____________________ being conducted by (your name), a student at _________ University. I have been informed that the goal of this inquiry is to _____________________________. I understand that if I agree to participate in this study, I will be asked to do the following: (1) take part in an interview; and (2) share my writings or published articles about my _____ work efforts that promote __________. I am aware that my participation is voluntary and I am free to decide not to participate or to withdraw at any time without penalty or prejudice, and that if I have any additional questions concerning this study, I may contact my professor, Dr. Rey Ty at (phone). As my work is public information, I decide to have all information gathered during this study to be made public, as I want to publicize all my social-action-related (sample) activities that promote positive social change and peace (sample), so that I can inspire more people to do ____________ work. I understand that there are no known risks or discomforts associated with this study. By participating in this research, I will benefit in the following ways: (1) to gain knowledge about ______, (2) to have the opportunity to participate in a qualitative research study, and (3) to have my name and my work, which are already publicly recognized, mentioned in the research papers. I acknowledge that I have received a copy of this consent form. ________________________________________________ ______________________ Signature of Participant Date I give my consent to have my name appear in the research findings which will be publicized. ________________________________________________ ______________________ Signature of Participant Date I give my consent for the researcher to quote me in any papers or articles resulting from this interview which will be publicized. ________________________________________________ ______________________ Signature of Participant Date I give my consent to have my photographs appear in the research findings. The researcher can take my photos and I will provide photos to the researcher, if needed. My photos can be posted online. ________________________________________________ ______________________ Signature of Participant Date I give my consent to have videos of me be taken and used in the research. The researcher can take videos of me and post them online. ________________________________________________ ______________________ Signature of Participant Date I give my consent for all the interviews to be tape-recorded and publicized. ________________________________________________ ______________________ Signature of Participant Date
  15. 15. 15 Your Name, Your Address, Your Phone, Your email; Dr. Rey Ty, Peace, Justice & Conflict Studies Program, DePaul University, 2352 N. Clifton Ave., Chicago IL 60614, Phone: 773-325-1147 Expectation Check and Leveling Off Name Self Peers Professor Content Methodology 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7) 8) 9) 10) 11) 12) 13) 14) 15) 16) 17) 18) 19) 20) Name Self Peers Professor Content Methodology Phone Tree Note: If you can’t reach the next person, skip & call the person right after the next person. Also, try calling back the next person. Rey Ty’s Phone __________________________ Line 1 Line 2 Name Phone Name Phone

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