2016 Pre-Departure Orientation Handbook for Chiang Mai, Thailand Travel

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2016 Pre-Departure Orientation Handbook for Chiang Mai, Thailand Travel

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2016 Pre-Departure Orientation Handbook for Chiang Mai, Thailand Travel

  1. 1. Page 1 of 40
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  3. 3. Page 3 of 40 Pre-Departure Orientation Handbook This is an open access publication. For the purpose of this book, individual authors or sources retain ownership of the copyright for their articles and materials contained in this book. Appropriate attribution can be provided by acknowledging the publisher, citing the original source and date of publication of the material properly, which does not in any way suggest that we endorse you or your use of the work. For any reuse or redistribution of this publication, you must also make clear the terms under which the work was reproduced. Open access to, and free use of, original work ensures the publication is freely and openly available. You may not use this work for commercial purposes. Edited by Dr. Rey Ty © 2016 Christian Conference of Asia c/o Payap University P.O. Box 183 Muang, Chiang Mai, Thailand 50000 Telephone: (66) 53-243-906, 243-907 Fax: (66) 53-247-303 Webpage: http://cca.org.hk/home/ Disclaimer All ideas expressed here belong to the individual authors. The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed in this volume do not necessarily reflect the views of the Christian Conference of Asia (CCA). Content, style, editing, and proofreading were the responsibility of each author or group of authors. All errors and omissions are those of the contributors. To save trees, we are not printing this Handbook. Index Addresses Basic Thai Language Buddhist Temples Chiang Mai Church of Christ of Thailand (CCT) Culture Cultural Visits Christian Conference of Asia Contact Information Dietary Restrictions Holidays Immigration and Customs Maps National Holidays Passport Payap University Pre-Departure Orientation Thai Phrases Thailand Thai Culture Visas Weather Production Credits Published in Chiang Mai, Thailand
  4. 4. Page 4 of 40 Contents CHAPTER 1: Christian Conference of Asia...............................................................................................7 CCA Structure......................................................................................................................................8 CCA Staff .............................................................................................................................................8 CCA Address........................................................................................................................................9 CCA Contact Persons in Chiang Mai....................................................................................................9 CCA Working Hours.............................................................................................................................9 CHAPTER 2: Practical Information before Your Travel..........................................................................10 PRE-CONSULTATION STAGE: Things to Prepare and Know Prior to Your Arrival .............................10 Registration Forms........................................................................................................................10 Visa Requirements ........................................................................................................................10 Reimbursements and Original Receipts........................................................................................10 Dietary Restrictions.......................................................................................................................10 Different Abilities and Accessibility ..............................................................................................11 Participants’ Country Reports.......................................................................................................11 Resource Persons’ Bios .................................................................................................................11 Resource Persons’ Presentation ...................................................................................................12 Ethnic or National Regalia.............................................................................................................12 General Guidelines for All Papers .................................................................................................12 Tips on Writing, Adapted from David Ogilvy ................................................................................12 Tips on Making Your PowerPoint Presentations Effective............................................................13 Airport Transfers...........................................................................................................................13 Medication and Toiletries.............................................................................................................14 Consultation Venue.......................................................................................................................14 Electric Power for your Computers and Electronics: Voltage, Frequency, Plugs, and Outlets.....14 CONSULTATION STAGE: Action Plans Preparation ...........................................................................15 Facebook Pages.............................................................................................................................15 Water Bottles and Cups ................................................................................................................15 POST-CONSULTATION STAGE: Report of Action Plan Implementation Upon Returning Home.......16 CHAPTER 3: Attitudes about Foreign Travels.......................................................................................17 Three Attitudes towards Different Countries and Cultures..............................................................17 Three Attitudes about Attending Conferences or Studying Abroad.................................................17 CHAPTER 4: Thailand.............................................................................................................................18
  5. 5. Page 5 of 40 Sacred Spaces....................................................................................................................................18 A Bountiful Table...............................................................................................................................18 Why People Love Thailand................................................................................................................18 Sand between Your Toes ..................................................................................................................18 Fields & Forests.................................................................................................................................18 Recommendations regarding Mourning Period for His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej.............19 Weather ............................................................................................................................................19 Thailand Do’s and Don’ts..................................................................................................................20 Thailand Do’s.................................................................................................................................20 Thailand Don’ts .............................................................................................................................21 Holidays in Thailand..........................................................................................................................22 National Holidays in Thailand ...........................................................................................................22 Western New Year –December 31st – January 1st .........................................................................22 Chakri Day –April 6th ......................................................................................................................22 Songkran (Thai New Year) –April 13th -15th ....................................................................................22 Labor Day –May 1st .......................................................................................................................23 Coronation Day –May 5th ..............................................................................................................23 Visakha Puja –June 4th ...................................................................................................................23 Asalha Puja Day –August 2nd , 2012...............................................................................................23 The Queen’s Birthday/Mother’s Day-August 12th ........................................................................23 Chulalongkorn Day—October 23rd ................................................................................................23 The King’s Birthday/Father’s Day-December 5th ...........................................................................23 Constitution Day –December 10th .................................................................................................23 Other Holidays and Festivals.............................................................................................................24 Loy Kratong ...................................................................................................................................24 Buddhist Lent—August 3rd – October 30th ....................................................................................24 Useful Thai Phrases...........................................................................................................................25 Map of Thailand with Neighboring Countries...................................................................................27 CHAPTER 5: Chiang Mai ........................................................................................................................28 Weather in Chiang Mai and Northern Thailand................................................................................28 Festivals and Holidays in Chiang Mai................................................................................................31 Transportation Contact Information in Chiang Mai..........................................................................32 When You Have Free Time................................................................................................................32 Museums.......................................................................................................................................33
  6. 6. Page 6 of 40 Chiang Mai National Museum ......................................................................................................33 The Chiang Mai University Art Museum.......................................................................................33 Buddhist Temples..........................................................................................................................33 Zoos, Cinéma, Shopping, and Other Attractions...........................................................................34 Easy Walking Map.........................................................................................................................34 Walking Map of Chiang Mai, Thailand..........................................................................................35 Chiang Mai Tourism Information..................................................................................................35 CHAPTER 6: Church of Christ in Thailand (CCT) – Chiang Mai ..............................................................36 CCT 75th Anniversary Building Map .................................................................................................36 CHAPTER 6: Payap University: At a Glance ..........................................................................................37 Payap University Location.................................................................................................................39 Mae Khao Campus ........................................................................................................................39 Kaew Nawarat Campus.................................................................................................................39
  7. 7. Page 7 of 40 CHAPTER 1: Christian Conference of Asia The Christian Conference of Asia began as the East Asia Christian Conference, which was constituted by a decision of churches, national councils of churches and Christian councils, whose representatives met at Prapat, Indonesia, in 1957. It was inaugurated at an assembly in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, in 1959, under the theme Witnessing Together. In the light of changing circumstances, the 1973 assembly, meeting in Singapore, agreed to change the name to Christian Conference of Asia (CCA). The purpose statement of the CCA says that CCA exists as an organ and a forum of continuing cooperation among the churches and national Christian bodies in Asia, within the framework of the wider ecumenical movement, believing that the purpose of God for the church in Asia is life together in a common obedience of witness to the mission of God in the world. In order to be a member of the CCA, churches must “confess the Lord Jesus Christ as God and Saviour according to the scriptures and therefore seek to fulfill their common calling to the one God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit”. National councils or similar bodies joining the CCA must also approve this basis. The CCA strives for the unity of the church in Asia, joint action in mission, Asian contribution to Christian thought and worship, sharing and fellowship among the churches in Asia and beyond, effective Christian response to the challenges of the changing societies of Asia, relationships with people of other faiths in Asia, human dignity and care for the creation. The themes reflect the continuing desire of the CCA to relate the common Christian witness of the churches, which constitute a small minority in most Asian countries, to the wider context of the people, the nations and the religions in Asia. The biblical promise of “fullness of life”, not only for Christians but for all of Asia’s people, especially the poor and marginalized, has been a guiding concept in recent years. In pursuing this reflection, the CCA takes into account the rapid industrialization of Asia, in the framework of globalization, and its implications of increasing social and economic injustice. Among the current priorities of the CCA are the strengthening of the koinonia of Asian churches and Christian communities, the healing of divisions in the churches and society, ecumenical formation, the expansion of the ecumenical fellowship in Asia to involve Roman Catholics and Evangelicals, and revitalizing the ecumenical vision, thought and action in regard to the emerging challenges in Asia and Asia’s place in the world. The core programmes of the CCA are Faith, Mission and Unity, Ecumenical Formation, Gender Justice and Youth Empowerment, Justice, International Affairs, Development and Service. Special concerns include the Congress of Asian Theologians, Ecumenical Theological Formation and the Decade to Overcome Violence (the DOV focus was on Asia in 2005). The CCA and the Federation of Asian Bishops’ Conferences (FABC, Roman Catholic Church) have formed an Asian Ecumenical Committee to monitor joint activities and programmes, e.g. in the field of ecumenical formation. Together they founded the Asian Movement for Christian Unity, which was joined by the Evangelical Fellowship of Asia in 2007. The CCA has 95 member churches and 16 member councils in 17 countries, representing 55 million Christians in Asia. Councils (national councils of churches and national Christian councils) are full members of the Conference along with the churches. The 2005 assembly decided that the offices of the CCA should be moved from Hong Kong to Chiang Mai, Thailand, in 2006.
  8. 8. Page 8 of 40 CCA Structure CCA Staff General Secretary Dr. Mathews George Chunakara Rev. Jung Eun Moon, Grace Dr. Rey Ty Dr. Alphinus Rantalemba Kambodji Rev. Dr. Chuleepran Srisoontorn Ms. Zeresh John Ms. Sunila Ammar Mr. Rama Rao Gollu Ms. Janjarat Saedan Ms. Phawinee Pinthong Ms. Patchayotai Boontama Ms. Casey Lita Lupe Moana Fa’Aui Ms. Han-Byeol Angela Kim Rev. Dedi Bakkit Tua Pardosi Mr. Jebasingh Samuvel Mrs. Arpa Yai-Chid (Ms. Ton) Mr. Wittaya Makasuk (Mr. Noi)
  9. 9. Page 9 of 40 CCA Address Christian Conference of Asia C/o Payap University Muang, Chiang Mai 50000 Thailand Tel.: 66 53 243 906-7 Fax.: 66 53 247 303 CCA Contact Persons in Chiang Mai Position Staff Contact Numbers 1. General Secretary Dr. Mathews George Chunakara +66 (0) 53 243 906-7 2. Program Coordinator Rev. Grace Moon +66 (0) 85 718 5214 3. Program Coordinator Dr. Rey Ty +66 (0) 61 792 1100 4. Consultant Dr. Alphinus Kambodji + 66 (0) 97 228 2850 5. Administrative Assistant Ms. Geng Patchayotai + 66 (0) 94 640 6688 6. Chauffeur Mr. Noi Makasuk +66 (0)91 851 5681 CCA Working Hours For all your communication and physical appearance needs, please note that the working hours at CCA are from 8:30 AM to 5:30 PM, local standard time.
  10. 10. Page 10 of 40 CHAPTER 2: Practical Information before Your Travel PRE-CONSULTATION STAGE: Things to Prepare and Know Prior to Your Arrival Registration Forms For all (1) participants and (2) resource persons, please submit your Registration Form on or before the deadline date. We need your full name, sex, name of airline carrier and flight numbers for arrival and departure, as well as U.S. dollar amount of airline tickets for those with partial or full subsidies. All these pieces of information are needed for planning with respect to guest house rooming, dietary planning, accessibility, airport transfers, and reimbursements, where applicable. Visa Requirements If you come from countries which require visas to enter Thailand, kindly let us know immediately so that we could prepare and send all the documents you need to submit to the Thai Embassy in your country. For your visa application, please include an original signed letter from your own organization in your own country that confirms you are formally selected by your organization to attend a consultation at CCA. In the unlikely event that you will have problems application for a visa, immediately email CCA about your issues. Also, you can make a phone call via Facebook, Google Hangout, Line, Skype, Whatsup, or other social media platform. Make sure you are connected with the responsible CCA personnel in at least one social media platform so that you can make a free international phone call. Otherwise, you can make a regular long-distance call to CCA. Reimbursements and Original Receipts For those with pre-approved partial or full subsidies, kindly must bring and submit original receipts (OR) for reimbursement purposes. Please take the most direct, cheapest air travel, such as with Air Asia. Please prepare your OR and signed reimbursement requests as soon as possible and submit by the second morning of the consultation so that you can be reimbursed in a timely manner. Dietary Restrictions In general, CCA will provide all meals (breakfast, morning refreshments, lunch, afternoon refreshments, and dinner), while you are attending a CCA consultation. If you have some dietary restrictions due to health, religious, philosophical, lifestyle, or other reasons, kindly include them in your Registration Form so that we can prepare the meal plan accordingly.
  11. 11. Page 11 of 40 Different Abilities and Accessibility If you need specific facilities or assistance due to certain needs, such as ramps and the like, kindly write them in your Registration Forms. Participants’ Country Reports -Each consultation is different. But in many Prophetic Diakonia and Advocacy (PD) and Building Peace and Moving beyond Conflicts consultations, participants will have time to share their country situationer. Please prepare 1) A brief overview of the situation affecting your community or country; 2) The current status of the problem; 3) The efforts that you or your community have been initiating. Each country group will be given a few minutes for the presentation. An LCD projector and a white screen are available in the conference room. -Please bring some educational materials produced by your churches or organizations related to the consultation theme, such as books, brochures, educational materials, CDs, etc. -Please bring your Bible, some hymn songs, and prayers which are needed for the morning and evening devotion during the consultation. Participants will be preparing morning devotion to be shared with the group. Short Essay in Word Format Each consultation is different. But for many (1) Prophetic Diakonia and Advocacy and (2) Building Peace and Moving beyond Conflicts consultations, you will be asked to prepare a simple six-page- maximum paper of your country reports, which will be compiled in an electronic book (e-Book) for dissemination. Please submit one month prior to the start of the consultation so that you can all receive an e-Book while at CCA with all these files via the closed page in Facebook. PowerPoint File Each consultation is different. But for many (1) Prophetic Diakonia and Advocacy and (2) Building Peace and Moving beyond Conflicts consultations, you will be asked to prepare a short PowerPoint presentation file about your country reports, which will be included in the e-Book. Please submit one month prior to the start of the consultation so that you can all receive an e-Book while at CCA with all these files via the closed page in Facebook. Resource Persons’ Bios We request all resource persons to submit your short personal bio or resumé in narrative format written in the third person one month prior to the start of the consultation. You do not need to include personal information, such as marital status or number of children. We will use your essay to introduce you and we will included bios of resource persons in consultation e-Books.
  12. 12. Page 12 of 40 Resource Persons’ Presentation We request all our resource persons, aside from presenting lectures, to promote critical thinking and engage in employing interactive teaching and learning strategies, by engaging the participants in Questions and Answers, activities, workshops, and discussions. Resource Persons’ Word Document We request all our resource persons to submit your lecture notes in Word document one month prior to the start of our consultations so that we can compile all the lecture notes in Word file into an electronic book (e-Book). Please do not submit files in PDF format, as we will not be able to compile individual PDF files into the e-Book. Resource Persons’ PowerPoint File (PPT) We request all our resource persons to submit your lecture notes one month prior to the start of our consultations so that we can compile all the lecture notes in PPT into an electronic book (e-Book). Please do not submit files in PDF format, as we will not be able to compile individual PDF files into the e-Book. Ethnic or National Regalia -We hope to have everyone in ethnic or traditional attire for the opening and closing worship. If possible, please prepare something close to your culture. -We will take a formal group photo right before lunch on the first day, which shall appear on the CCA press release on the web. We highly recommend you to wear your ethnic or national regalia on the first day for this purpose. General Guidelines for All Papers 1. 6 pages max, single spaced 2. Provide a short title in Line 1, followed by your name in Line 2 3. Start with an Introduction: Statement of the concern, issue, challenges, or problems; importance of the subject; questions or hypotheses you are addressing; reference to models, theory of change, methodology, or approaches, definition of terms 4. Main Body: Your Findings 5. Conclusion and Recommendations, including implications, uses, or contribution of the paper to knowledge and practice 6. References Tips on Writing, Adapted from David Ogilvy Source: https://www.brainpickings.org/2012/02/07/david-ogilvy-on-writing/ 1. Write the way you talk. Naturally.
  13. 13. Page 13 of 40 2. Use short words, short sentences and short paragraphs. 3. Never use jargon words like reconceptualize, demassification, attitudinally, judgmentally. They are hallmarks of a pretentious ass. 4. Never write more than two pages on any subject. 5. Check your quotations. 6. Never send a letter or a memo on the day you write it. Read it aloud the next morning — and then edit it. 7. If it is something important, get a colleague to improve it. 8. Before you send your letter or your memo, make sure it is crystal clear what you want the recipient to do. Tips on Making Your PowerPoint Presentations Effective Adapted from this Source: https://www.facebook.com/pg/somtomofficial/photos/?tab=album&album_id=1778741209063033 1. Build a story 2. Keep it relevant 3. Cut your introduction 4. Begin with an eye-opener 5. Keep it short and sweet: 25 words max per slide 6. Use facts, not generalities 7. Customize for every audience 8. Have one image per slide: Simplify your graphics 9. Keep backgrounds in the background 10. Use large and readable fonts: Don’t use all caps 11. Don’t get too fancy 12. Check your equipment in advance 13. Speak to the audience 14. Never read from the slides 15. Don’t skip around 16. Avoid obvious wormholes 17. Skip the jargon 18. Make it timely 19. Prepare some questions 20. Have a separate handout 21. Don’t steal ideas: Recognize sources Airport Transfers CCA will arrange to receive you when you arrive at Chiang Mai airport, and also drop you back at the airport when you leave. We can only do this, if you submit your air travel information to CCA on time.
  14. 14. Page 14 of 40 Upon arrival, regardless of whether you came out of the International Terminal or Domestic Terminal of Chiang Mai Airport, kindly gather at Gate Number Eight (8) where the CCA driver will pick you up. CCA's driver's name is Mr. Noi. His phone numbers are 0918515681 and 0876561885. For those getting out from the International Terminal: Right before you get out of the International Terminal, there is a booth that gives new international travelers a free SIM card for tourists which is good for a couple of hours. Try to get one free SIM card if you can and use it to call CCA's driver Mr. Noi in case you were not able to see him. Medication and Toiletries To be on the safe side, please bring your own basic medicines and toiletries: prescription medicine, toothbrush, toothpaste, soap, towels, and the like. Consultation Venue In general, consultations will be held at (1) the CCA Headquarters mostly and (2) at the CCT 17th Anniversity Building at other times. CCA Headquarters Some consultations take place at the CCA Headquarters and accommodation are arranged at Paradornparp International House, Payap University, 60/3 M.1 T. Sanklang A. Sankhampheang, Chiang Mai 50130 Tel: 053-851 377, 053-851 380 (Please keep a printout of this address, as you will have to mention this in the Disembarkation card). Church of Christ in Thailand (CCT) Building Some consultations are held at the 75th Anniversary Building, The Church of Christ in Thailand, 29, Ratanakosin Rd., Watketh, Muang, Chiangmai 50000, Thailand. You will stay at the Guest House of the same building. CCA will arrange for your transportation. Tel: 053-244-381-2 Fax: 053-244-385 ext 404 อาคาร 75 ปี สภาคริสตจักรในประเทศไทย (ศูนย์พันธกิจภาคเหนือ) 29 ถ.รัตนโกสินทร์ ต.วัดเกต อ.เมือง จ.เชียงใหม่ 50000 โทร: 0-5324-4381-2 Fax: 0-5324-4385 ต่อ 404 (Please keep a printout of this address, as you will have to mention this in the Disembarkation card). Electric Power for your Computers and Electronics: Voltage, Frequency, Plugs, and Outlets
  15. 15. Page 15 of 40 Source: https://www.travelfish.org/faq_answer.php?qID=13 Thailand's voltage is 220-240AC, 50 Hertz. The plugs in Thailand are not standardized -- there are at least three different types, some two pin and some three, so be sure to either bring a universal adapter or buy one once you arrive in Thailand. Universal adapters can be purchased before arriving in Thailand or else they can be found in electronics and department stores in major urban centres such as Bangkok, Chiang Mai and Phuket. In rural areas you may have more difficulty finding one. It is not unusual to see multiple socket types in the one building -- or even in the one room! The following chart on Wikipedia has photographic examples of each plug type. Note that especially in older buildings, the earth pin may not actually be wired in correctly. Make no assumptions with regard to grounding. Table of mains voltages and frequencies Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_electricity_by_country Country or Territory Plug type Plug standard Residential voltage Frequency Comments Thailand A, B C, F Thai plug - - TIS 166- 2549 220 V 50 Hz Newer buildings and installation use TIS166-2549 sockets.[35][36] Power cords with type A or B plugs which are rated at only 125 V may present a safety hazard. CONSULTATION STAGE: Action Plans Preparation In many (1) Prophetic Diakonia and Advocacy and (2) Peace Building and Moving beyond Conflict consultations, participants will prepare and present simple and realistic Action Plans while at CCA. Please submit your Action Plans by the end of the consultation with CCA, which will be compiled into an electronic book (eBook) and shared to all via the closed page in Facebook. Facebook Pages Closed Facebook pages are created for many consultations. Please join as soon as possible, so that all persons involved in the consultation can share information, updates, photos, reports, and other related matters. Water Bottles and Cups
  16. 16. Page 16 of 40 Please bring your own bottles, if you have them. Otherwise, we shall provide cups for your use. Kindly hold on to one cup for the whole day. We shall try to perform little things daily to protect Nature. Thank you for your kind cooperation. POST-CONSULTATION STAGE: Report of Action Plan Implementation Upon Returning Home You will already have implemented your Action Plans three (3) month after returning to your home organizations and countries. Deadline for submission of your Action Plan reports shall be exactly three (3) months after the consultation you attended ended. Please share a one-page-maximum Report with the following information: (1) title, (2) your name, (3) your country, (4) objectives, (5) outputs, or what you have done, e.g. 50 teakwood trees planted (what), 25 volunteers (who), August 2, 201=20 (when), Manila Bay in front of the Mall of Asia (where), (6) outcomes, e.g. heightened awareness of urban decay, deforestation, flooding, soil erosion, and social responsibility and one- page maximum of photos with descriptive captions per photo: total of two pages maximum. All reports shall be compiled into an e-Book and disseminated to all via the closed page in Facebook.
  17. 17. Page 17 of 40 CHAPTER 3: Attitudes about Foreign Travels Three Attitudes towards Different Countries and Cultures Source: Bennett, J. M., & Bennett, M. J. (2004). Developing intercultural competence: A reader. Portland, OR: Intercultural Communication Institute. Three Attitudes about Attending Conferences or Studying Abroad
  18. 18. Page 18 of 40 CHAPTER 4: Thailand Source: http://www.lonelyplanet.com/thailand/introduction#ixzz4OjwDnZSD Friendly and fun loving, exotic and tropical, cultured and historic, Thailand radiates a golden hue from its glittering temples and tropical beaches through to the ever-comforting Thai smile. Sacred Spaces The celestial world is a close confidant in this Buddhist nation, and religious devotion is colourful and ubiquitous. Gleaming temples and golden Buddhas frame both the rural and modern landscape. Ancient banyan trees are ceremoniously wrapped in sacred cloth to honour the resident spirits, fortune-bringing shrines decorate humble homes as well as monumental malls, while garland- festooned dashboards ward off traffic accidents. Visitors can join the conversation through meditation retreats in Chiang Mai, religious festivals in northeastern Thailand, underground cave shrines in Kanchanaburi and Phetchaburi and hilltop temples in northern Thailand. A Bountiful Table Adored around the world, Thai cuisine expresses fundamental aspects of Thai culture: it is generous, warm, refreshing and relaxed. Each Thai dish relies on fresh, local ingredients – pungent lemongrass, searing chillies and plump seafood. A varied national menu is built around the four fundamental flavours: spicy, sweet, salty and sour. Roving appetites go on eating tours of Bangkok noodle shacks, seafood pavilions in Phuket and Burmese market stalls in Mae Sot. Cooking classes reveal the simplicity behind the seemingly complicated dishes and mastering the market is an important survival skill. Why People Love Thailand It's easy to say that the thing I love most about Thailand is Thai food. But then I'm reminded of that feeling of freedom during a motorcycle trip upcountry. And of the sensory overload of a busy morning market – or a night out in Bangkok. And of encounters with history and culture, the new and the old, at just about every turn. Did I mention the white-sand beaches, jungles, ancient ruins and Buddhist temples? Indeed, the food satisfies – but on second thought, Thailand offers so much more. Sand between Your Toes With a long coastline (actually, two coastlines) and jungle-topped islands anchored in azure waters, Thailand is a tropical getaway for the hedonist and the hermit, the prince and the pauper. This paradise offers a varied menu: playing in the gentle surf of Ko Lipe, diving with whale sharks off Ko Tao, scaling the sea cliffs of Krabi, kiteboarding in Hua Hin, partying on Ko Phi Phi, recuperating at a health resort on Ko Samui and feasting on the beach wherever sand meets sea. Fields & Forests In between the cluttered cities and towns is the rural heartland, which is a mix of rice paddies, tropical forests and squat villages tied to the agricultural clock. In the north, the forests and fields bump up against toothy blue mountains decorated with silvery waterfalls. In the south, scraggy limestone cliffs poke out of the cultivated landscape like prehistoric skyscrapers. The usually arid
  19. 19. Page 19 of 40 northeast emits an emerald hue during the rainy season when tender green rice shoots carpet the landscape. Recommendations regarding Mourning Period for His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej Source: http://www.tatnews.org/recommendations-regarding-mourning-period-for-his-majesty- king-bhumibol-adulyadej/ Thailand is now in an official period of mourning following the passing of His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej. In this regard, the Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT) would like all visitors to Thailand to continue with their travel plans as normal. Furthermore, kindly be advised of the following: • Many Thai people will be wearing black or white clothing as a sign of mourning. This is not required of visitors but if possible, they should wear sombre and respectful clothing when in public. • Visitors should refrain from conducting any inappropriate or disrespectful behaviour. • Tourist attractions will be open as usual with the exception of Wat Phra Kaeo (Temple of the Emerald Buddha) and the Grand Palace, as they will be the venue of the Royal Funeral Rites. • The Government has asked for the cooperation from the entertainment venues; such as, bars and nightclubs to consider the opening of their business operations during this time. The decision will be made by the individual owners. • Most of the traditional and cultural events will be taking place as usual, although the celebrations may be changed for appropriateness as a mark of respect, or the events may be dedicated to the memory of His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej. • All transport, banks, hospitals and other public services will be operating as usual. • The related authorities have stepped up safety and security measures for all Thais and visitors to facilitate their travelling around the country. • For any enquiries, please contact our TAT domestic offices or Tel.: 1672. TAT would like to thank all visitors for their understanding and supporting Thailand during this period of time. Weather Source: http://www.tourismthailand.org/About-Thailand/Weather The Thailand climate is controlled by tropical monsoons and the weather in Thailand is generally hot and humid across most of the country throughout most of the year. While Thailand’s seasons are generally divided into the hot season, cool season, and rainy season, in reality it’s relatively hot most of the year. The weather in central, northern, and northeastern Thailand (the landlocked provinces) is determined by three seasons, whereas the southern, coastal regions of Thailand feature only two, making the weather in Thailand quite easy to understand and plan a trip around. In Thailand’s inland provinces the seasons are clearly defined: Between November and May the weather is mostly dry and the cool season and hot season occur from November to February and March to May respectively. The other inland season, the rainy season, lasts from May to November and is dominated by the southwest monsoon, during which time rainfall in most of Thailand is at its heaviest. The southern,
  20. 20. Page 20 of 40 coastal region of Thailand really has only two seasons – rainy season and dry season. Fortunately, for those planning a beach holiday, Thailand’s two coasts have slightly different rainy seasons, allowing visitors to find sunny beaches nearly year round. On the Andaman or west coast, where Phuket, Krabi, and the Phi Phi Islands lie, the southwest monsoon brings heavy storms from April to October, while on the Gulf of Thailand or east coast, where Koh Samui, Koh Phangan, and Koh Tao lie, the most rain falls between September and December. Thailand Do’s and Don’ts Source: http://www.thaizer.com/thailand-dos-and-donts/ Don’t get too hung up about learning a huge list of do’s and don’ts! Most social indiscretions will be forgiven without you even realizing. Thais know that foreign visitors have their own customs and different ways of doing things, but if you are aware of some of the do’s and don’ts you will earn respect from your Thai hosts. Most importantly of all, be particularly careful about respecting Buddhism and the Thai Royal Family. Thailand Do’s  Do respect all Buddha images. Buddha images are held sacred and sacrilegious acts are punishable by imprisonment even if committed by foreign visitors.  Do dress properly when visiting a temple. Read more advice about visiting Thai temples  Do remove your shoes before entering a temple, somebody’s house and even some shops. When to take off your shoes  Do treat monks with the highest respect.  Do try and keep calm no matter what the problem or provocation may be.  Do eat with a spoon. Use the fork to load food on to the spoon. Read more about food etiquette  Do lower your body slightly when passing between or in front of people.
  21. 21. Page 21 of 40  Do try and learn a few basic phrases in Thai, like ‘hello’ and ‘thank you’. Learn a few Thai phrases and helpful tips for getting by in Thailand  Do smile a lot. Understanding the Thai smile  Do enjoy yourself. Thais like life to be sanuk. Understanding the concept of sanuk  Do ensure that you have a visa if you need one. Find out if you need a visa for travel to Thailand  Do make sure you have adequate travel insurance. Read more about the importance of travel insurance for Thailand Thailand Don’ts  Don’t show disrespect towards the Thai Royal Family. It’s a criminal offence to insult the Thai monarchy. Read more here »  Don’t cross your legs when you are in the presence of a monk. This applies whether you are sitting on the floor or in a chair.  Don’t touch a Thai woman without consent. Despite the image portrayed in some bars and clubs, the majority of Thai women are conservative.  Don’t be overly affectionate in public. This has changed in recent years and younger Thai couples can be seen holding hands, but snogging your boyfriend or girlfriend in the middle of the shopping mall won’t win you too many friends. As with many things, Thais know that behaviour in the West is different to Thailand so you won’t be chased out of town for holding hands with your partner, but resist the temptation to do so inside temple grounds.  Don’t sunbathe nude. This is offensive to most Thai people although nobody is likely to say anything to you if you do so.  Don’t worry too much about whether you should wai or not. Find out more about the traditional Thai greeting  Don’t touch a Thai person’s head or ruffle their hair. Apologize if you accidentally touch somebody’s head. There are exceptions to this standard of behaviour; for example, it doesn’t apply to lovers in the privacy of their room. Thai people will also sometimes pat a child on the head, but as a Westerner it’s best not to do this to any child to prevent any embarrassment.  Don’t place your feet on the table while sitting, don’t point to anything with your feet and don’t touch anybody with your feet.  Don’t raise your voice or lose your temper; try and be jai yen. Find out more about being jai yen  Don’t be offended by questions about age, marital status or what you do for a living. These are subjects that will often come up in small-talk. Of course, you don’t have to answer (especially the question about age), you can just smile and just say it’s a secret or ‘mai bok’ (‘not telling’). Read more about Thai small talk  Don’t take Buddha images out of the country. Strictly speaking it is against the law to take or send Buddha images out of the country unless special permission has been granted. However, this doesn’t mean that stores won’t sell them to you. They will sell them to you, but won’tnecessarily tell you about the regulations. Respecting Buddha images  Don’t overstay your visa.
  22. 22. Page 22 of 40 Holidays in Thailand Source: http://www.reachtoteachrecruiting.com/guides/thailand/holidays-in-thailand/ In Thailand, having the time to relax and celebrate with friends and family is important. With over a dozen public holidays throughout the year, there are plenty of opportunities to celebrate, and to experience the richness of Thai culture. Some holidays in Thailand Thai festivals follow the Western calendar, and occur on the same date each year. Others are based on the lunar calendar, and their dates vary from year to year. If the date of a holiday or festival falls on a weekend, the next working day will be taken as a holiday. Here is a list of the most important holidays in Thailand. National Holidays in Thailand Western New Year –December 31st – January 1st In Thailand, New Year’s Eve, and New Year’s Day are official holidays. Thais welcome the new year with music, dance, and good food. On the first morning of the new year, many people will go to a Buddhist temple, for religious ceremonies and making offerings. Makha Bucha (Magha Puja) –Feb 7th , 2012 This is a traditional Thai holiday celebrated in the third lunar month, on the night of the full moon. In 2012, this falls on Feb 7th . The holiday celebrates an important date in Buddhist history, when over 1200 of the Buddha’s disciples gathered to hear a sermon laying out central principles of Buddhist teachings. Chakri Day –April 6th The current dynasty in Thailand is the Chakri dynasty. This holiday celebrates the founding of this dynasty, and it is when people throughout the country stop to pay respect to past and current royalty. Songkran (Thai New Year) –April 13th -15th Songkran is one of the biggest and most important Thai holidays. The 3 day celebration is often combined with the weekend to make a 5 day break. This holiday is celebrated with parades, religious ceremonies, and festivities throughout the country. Water plays a big part in this holiday. It is associated with purifying things for the new year, bringing rain for a good harvest, and with fertility. The tradition of splashing water on people has grown into a multi-day water-fight, where water guns, buckets, and hoses are used to drench everyone in sight. If you are in Thailand during Songkran, expect to get wet!
  23. 23. Page 23 of 40 Labor Day –May 1st Although there are no large celebrations, Labor Day is a national holiday in Thailand, which means that many businesses and schools are closed on this day. Coronation Day –May 5th This holiday celebrates the coronation of Thailand’s current king, King Bhumibol. He was crowned king in 1946, and is the longest-reigning monarch in the world. Visakha Puja –June 4th This Buddhist holiday celebrates the three major events in the Buddha’s life: his birth, his enlightenment, and his death. Asalha Puja Day –August 2nd , 2012 Based on the lunar calendar, Asalha Puja day is usually celebrated in July or early August. This day celebrates the day of the Buddha’s first sermon. The Queen’s Birthday/Mother’s Day-August 12th This day celebrates the queen’s birthday, as well as being Thailand’s Mother’s Day. Chulalongkorn Day—October 23rd On this day, the life of King Chulalongkorn is commemorated. King Chulalongkorn played an important part in modernizing Thailand, establishing freedom of religion, and maintaining Thailand’s independence in the face of European colonialism. The King’s Birthday/Father’s Day-December 5th This holiday celebrates the birthday of Thailand’s current king, and it is also the national Father’s Day. Constitution Day –December 10th Thailand became a constitutional monarchy in 1932. This holiday celebrates the signing of Thailand’s constitution.
  24. 24. Page 24 of 40 Other Holidays and Festivals Loy Kratong October 29th , 2012 This festival is held on the night of the 12th full moon. In 2012, this is 29 October. Although not a national holiday, this is an important festival. People honor the river goddess by floating candles down waterways throughout Thailand, leading to the name “The Festival of Lights.” Buddhist Lent—August 3rd – October 30th During Buddhist lent, people offer food and candles to temples, and hold a number of festivals, events, and religious ceremonies.
  25. 25. Page 25 of 40 Useful Thai Phrases Source: http://www.omniglot.com/language/phrases/thai.php A collection of useful phrases in Thai, a Tai-Kadai language spoken mainly in Thailand. Key to abbreviations: m = said by men, f = said by women This page mainly uses the Thai2English transliteration system for Thai, or the system used in Lonely Planet Thai phrasebooks. English ภาษาไทย (Thai) Welcome ยินดีต้อนรับ (yin dee dtôn ráp) Hello (General greeting) สวัสดี (sà-wàt-dee) Hello (on phone) ฮัลโหล (hanlǒh) How are you? สบายดีไหม (sà-baai dee măi) เป็นอย่างไรบ้าง? (bpen yàang rai bâang?) สบายดีหรือ? (sà-baai dee rĕu?) Reply to 'How are you?' สบายดีคร้บ (sà-baai dee króp) - m สบายดีค่ะ (sà-baai dee kâ) - f What's your name? คุณชีออะไร? (kun chêu a-rai ?) My name is ... ผมชื่อ ... (pŏm chêu ...) m เราชื่อ (rao chêu ...) f Where are you from? คุณมาจากไหน (kun maa jàak năi) คุณมาจากทีไหน? (kun maa jàak tee năi?) I'm from ... ผมมาจาก ... (pŏm maa jàak ...) m เรามาจาก ... (rao maa jàak ...) f Pleased to meet you ยินดีที่ได้รู้จัก (yin dee têe dâi róo jàk) Good morning (Morning greeting) สวัสดีครับ (sà-wàt-dee kráp) - m สวัสดีค่ะ (sà-wàt-dee kâ) - f Good evening (Evening greeting) สวัสดีครับ (sà-wàt-dee kráp) - m สวัสดีค่ะ (sà-wàt-dee kâ) - f Good night ราตรีสวัสดิ์ (raa-dtree sà-wàt) Goodbye (Parting phrases) บ๊ายบาย (báai baai) ลาก่อนนะ (laa gòn ná)
  26. 26. Page 26 of 40 Good luck ขอให้โชคดี! (kŏr hâi chôhk dee) Cheers! Good Health! (Toasts used when drinking) ไชโย! (chai-yoh) Have a nice day มีวันที่ดี! (Mī wạn thī dī) Bon appetit / Have a nice meal กินให้อร่อย (gin hâi a-ròi) ทานให้อร่อย (taan hâi a-r i) Bon voyage / Have a good journey ขอให้เดินทางโดยสวัสดิภาพ (kŏr hâi dern taang doi sà-wàt-dì-pâap) เดินทางโดยสวัสดิภาพ (dern taang doi sà-wàt-dì-pâap) เที่ยวให้สนุก (tîeow hâi sà-nùk) - Have a fun trip I don't know ฉันไม่รู้ (chăn mâi róo) I understand เข้าใจแล้ว (kâo jai l ew) I don't understand ไม่เข้าใจ (mâi khâo jai) Please speak more slowly พูดช้าลงหน่อย (pôot cháa long nòi) Please say that again พูดอีกทีได้ไหม (pôot èek tee dâai măi) Please write it down เขียนลงบนกระดาษได้ไหม? (k an long bon grà-dàat dâi măi?) ช่วยเขียนลงให้หน่อย้ไหม (ch ay k an long hâi n i dâai măi) Do you speak English? พูดอังกฤษได้ไหม (pôot ang-grìt dâai măi) คุณพูดภาษาอังกฤษหรือเปล่า? (kun pôot paa-săa ang-grìt rĕu bplào?) Do you speak Thai? คุณพูดไทยได้ไหม (kun pôot tai dâai măi) คุณพูดภาษาไทยเป็นไหม? (kun pôot paa-săa tai bpen măi?) How do you say ... in Thai? ภาษาไทย ... พูดว่าอย่างไร (paasăa tai ... pôot wâa yàang-rai) Excuse me ขอโทษ (kŏr tôht) How much is this? ราคาเท่าไหร่ (raa-kaa tâo rài?) Sorry ขอโทษ (kŏr tôht) Please ขอ ... (Kor ...)
  27. 27. Page 27 of 40 Thank you ขอบคุณ (kòp kun) ขอบคุณมาก (kòp kun mâak) Reply to thank you ไม่เป็นไร (mâi bpen rai) Where's the toilet? ห้องน้าอยู่ไหน (hông n am y o năi) ห้องน้าอยู่ที่ไหน? (hông n am y o têe năi?) Would you like to dance with me? เต้นกันไหม (dtên gan măi) Do you come here often? คุณมาที่นี่บ่อยหรือเปล่า? (khuṇ m thī nī bxy hr x pel ?) I miss you ผมคิดถึงคุณ (poŏm kít teŏung kun) - m ฉันคิดถึงเธอ (chaŏn kít teŏung ter) - f/inf & m/intimate I love you ผมรักคุณ (pŏm r k kun) - m ฉันรักคุณ (chăn r k kun) - f Leave me alone! อย่ายุ่งกับ ผม! (Y yung kap phom) - m อย่ายุ่งกับ ฉัน! (Y yung kap chan! - f Go away! อย่ายุ่งกับ ผม! (Yaa yung kap phom) - m อย่ายุ่งกับ ฉัน! (Yaa yung kap chan!) - f Help! ช่วยด้วย! (chûay dûay!) Fire! ไฟไหม้! (fai mâi!) Stop! หยุด! (yùt!) Call the police! เรียกตารวจมา! (rîak dtam-rùat maa!) Map of Thailand with Neighboring Countries Source: https://guatemalathroughmyeyes. wordpress.com/2015/08/25/back packing-bonus-3-cultural- experiences-in-chiang-mai/
  28. 28. Page 28 of 40 CHAPTER 5: Chiang Mai Weather in Chiang Mai and Northern Thailand Source : http://www.1stopchiangmai.com/about_cm/seasons Weather in Chiang Mai and Northern Thailand The weather of Northern Thailand, including Chiang Mai, differs from the traditional divisions of spring, summer, autumn and winter. Instead, the region has three distinct seasons: the cool season, hot season and rainy season. Chiang Mai is known as the 'cool capital', and in comparison to the sweaty heat of Bangkok, the climate is far more agreeable. Cool season in Chiang Mai The most popular time for visiting Chiang Mai (weather wise) is the cool season, which runs from December to the end of February. It is in fact pleasantly chilly in the evenings, and if you are planning on visiting Chiang Mai at this time of year, it would be wise to bring all-weather gear along; particularly if you intend hiring a motorcycle to get around, or going on a mountain trek. However, don't leave out your summer clothes, as midday temperatures can climb well into the 30s (Celsius). Hot season in Chiang Mai Try to avoid a holiday to Thailand during this time (April-June) as unless you are completely accustomed to tropical heat, you will find the humidity utterly draining. Despite all the moisture in the air, however, there is virtually no rain during this period. The lack of water with blazing heat and slash-and-burn agricultural practices causes the usually lush green jungle that covers the surrounding hills to turn a charred brown from fires that burn almost constantly from January until the rains arrive. Not only does this affect the vegetation, but a trademark 'hot season haze' hangs over the entire city, obscuring the beautiful vistas. The weather starts heating up in Chiang Mai around early February, and by mid-March, the nippy nights of December are nothing but a pleasant memory, with daytime maximums regularly reaching 40°C. Rainy season in Chiang Mai The southwest monsoon usually arrives from India at the end of May, and from then until November the weather in Chiang Mai and northern Thailand is very wet. The rainy season is characterized by torrential downpours, but they tend to be sudden bursts that only last for an hour or so rather than a steady stream of water. Although mosquitoes are rife during this time, the rainy season is otherwise a pleasant time to visit the north. The rains bring respite from the heat, and the landscape returns to its strikingly-gorgeous shade of green. Rainfall is usually heaviest in September, with an average precipitation of 250mm.
  29. 29. Page 29 of 40 Note: To find the best rate hotels in Chiang Mai, and we’ve lined up the web’s biggest room booker, Agoda.com, for an instant search. Dozens of cheap guesthouses are also listed. Murky March Health Hazards Chiang Mai has a particularly chronic problem with burning (and resulting haze) in March. The mountain views disappear as the Ping River valley chokes under a dusty haze that can often be a health hazard. This is the result of indiscriminate burning by ill-educated peasant farmers, couple with stagnant breeze-less weather. Authorities have failed in recent years to tackle the issue, as tourists are advised to stay away and locals remain indoors on days when the dust particle levels far exceed accepted international health thresholds. Generally speaking, the weather of northern Thailand is far more temperate than central or southern Thailand. The area is more than 2,000kms from the equator and much closer to the Tropic of Cancer. This, coupled with its mountainous terrain and location in the Asian interior, brings cooler temperatures and less humidity. However, there is still quite a bit of precipitation during the rainy season and the weather gets very chilly once you leave Chiang Mai and head up into the mountains. Chiang Mai weather by month January: January is a very popular month to visit the North as it experiences Thailand’s coolest weather, making Chiang Mai and the mountains a novelty with Thai tourists. Expect temperatures similar to a sunny European summer day, somewhat hazy, and chilly at night. February: The weather and temperatures are still very agreeable in Chiang Mai in February, though it still gets quite hot around midday in the valleys. It never rains, but by now the landscape is quite dry and the vistas hazy. Tourist services remain busy. March: March is one of the worst times to visit Chiang Mai (weather wise), since the air is thick with dust and micro-particles from widespread rural burning. The haze removes any view of the mountains, there’s no breeze, and the results can be a health hazard on certain days. April: The weather in Chiang Mai gets very hot in April as temperatures peak in the mid 30s (Celsius); the rain has yet to cool the region down and the landscape remains dry. A popular reason to visit is the annual Songkran water splash festival, which is best enjoyed in Chiang Mai – hotels fill up by mid- month. May: From May onwards the tourist season in Chiang Mai and Northern Thailand is in decline, but the weather improves as the rains arrive. This means sunny skies and afternoon storms to cool things off.
  30. 30. Page 30 of 40 June: It’s still hot in June in Chiang Mai as the weather moves into the full rainy season, bringing with it 90 per cent humidity, adding to the immense feeling of warmth. It’s still cooler than Bangkok and the South. July: July is low season in northern Thailand; cloud cover in the rainy season cools the weather in Chiang Mai but you also get plenty of sunshine in between the showers. It remains hot, though could be cloudy and warm for days. Room rates are cheaper, tourist numbers far less, but the experience is just as pleasant. August: Mainly backpackers come to Chiang Mai in August, while most other tourists prefer more northern summer destinations around the globe. This means the budget travellers get out-of-season deals, see the province when it’s at its lushest and still get plenty of sunshine… even if it’s humid and sometimes cloudy! September: September is one of the quietest months for tourism in Chiang Mai and usually the wettest weather. Expect showers almost every day, along with cloud cover (but warm temperatures), a good chance of sunshine, and high humidity. Best bargains on prices this month. October: October is one of the prettiest times to visit Chiang Mai and Northern Thailand, at the tail end of the wet weather when the rice fields create a patchwork of green across the landscape. It might still rain regularly but remains mostly sunny and begins to cool and become less humid. However, there are few tourists to enjoy this. November: Prices jump up from early November as the tourist season gets going and the weather dries up, with sunny skies, cooler days and the lush remains of six months of rain. It’s one of the best times to visit, not quite busy yet but some of the best weather, with clear views of the mountains. December: December is probably the busiest month for tourism in Chiang Mai and northern Thailand in general as local Thai tourists make the most of the cool weather. Expect full hotels and busy roads during long weekends – especially in Pai – but nice clear mountain views, chilly evenings, and sunny skies.
  31. 31. Page 31 of 40 Festivals and Holidays in Chiang Mai Source: https://www.tourismthailand.org/About-Thailand/Destination/Chiang-Mai Thailand’s “Rose of the North” is a cultural and natural wonderland with ethnic diversity, a multitude of attractions and welcoming hospitality. Sunday Walking Street Rachadamnoen Road Every Sunday from 3-11 pm (roughly) Rachadamoen Road, which runs from Pra Singh temple to Thapae Gate, is closed to vehicle traffic and becomes an impromptu market with local handicrafts, food, art, and roadside foot/back massages all up for sale. And of course, it’s also a big spot for people-watching, perhaps the biggest of Chiang Mai pastimes. Saturday Walking Street Wualai Road Little cousin to the bigger Sunday Walking Street, this one takes place on Wualai, which runs from Chiang Mai Gate to the superhighway, near Airport Plaza. Much of the same available, with more emphasis on silver goods and jewelry. Loi Krathong (November full moon festival) Loi Krathong literally means “to float a krathong” (krathong being a small decorative float with incense, flowers and candles), and that’s what people do on this holiday, probably more so in Chiang Mai than elsewhere in Thailand. Couples float krathongs on the river and in canals, floating lanterns can be seen in the sky over Chiang Mai in the thousands, and parades, beauty contests, and fireworks abound, all along the banks of the Ping River. Chiang Mai Food Festival Airport Plaza parking lot 700 Year Stadium Two separate food festivals held back to back at the end of November / beginning of December every year. You can try all kinds of Thai food for low prices. Nimmanhaemin Art and Design Promenade Nimmanhaemin Soi 1 Held every year at the beginning of December, this is a chance to see Chiang Mai’s “modern side,” with artists, photographers, designers, and fashionistas coming out for a “beautiful people” gettogether. Draws a similar artsy crowd from Bangkok as well. You can find some of Chiang Mai’s most stylish home decor, art, and clothing here. Chiang Mai Winter Festival near 700 Year Stadium Chiang Mai’s version of an American county fair; bumper cars, ferris wheels, cotton candy, haunted houses, bearded ladies, local boys and girls flirting, and of course tons of Thai food. Don’t miss the they’d-never-let-this-happen- back-home wall of death motorcycle/auto stunt show. Late December. Bo Sang Umbrella Festival Bo Sang Village Renowned for its decorative umbrellas, Bo Sang plays host to a festival celebrating its number one product every year in January. Floats on parade, traditional northern music, and of course thousands of colorful umbrellas on display. Chiang Mai Flower Festival along the Western edge of the city moat This festival is held on the first weekend of February. An exhibition of seasonal blooming flowers coupled with flower-themed floats on parade, and a huge number of floral / general horticultural goods on sale.
  32. 32. Page 32 of 40 Chinese New Year Warorot Market area Exploding firecrackers, dragon costumed-dancers, and lots of red and gold to bring in the Chinese New Year. The Chinese lunar calendar means the date changes every year, usually happening sometime between February - March. Songkran (Thai New Year) Chiang Mai is undoubtedly the most popular place in the country for Thais to bring in the new year. Expect packed crowds everywhere for 5 days straight in mid-April taking in the parades, bathing Buddha images, and joining in a city-wide water fight between all comers: locals, visiting Bangkokians, foreigners, hill tribes — everyone gets wet. Transportation Contact Information in Chiang Mai Transportation There are many ways to get around while studying abroad at Payap University. Bicycles Bicycling is the preferable mode of transportation for many IC students. There is an option to rent or buy bicycles while studying abroad and many students find it the most freeing way to travel. While the Chiang Mai traffic can seem intimidating, Thai motorists are very used to bicycles and riding a bike is a safe and cheap way of getting around. Songtaows Songtaow (Central Thai for “two rows”), or “Red Truck” as it is sometimes called, is a covered pickup truck with bench seats running along both sides. It is the most common form of public transportation. Most trips within the usual range of that driver will need negotiating. Before getting in the Songtaow, tell the driver where you want to go. Once s/he understands, ask how much. If the price seems reasonable to you, get in the back. If not, feel free to bargain a lower price. With groups of 5-10, you will usually only pay 20 THB per person. Motorbikes Motorbikes are the most common for students in the International College. However, they are also the most dangerous. Many students have been in severe accidents including one death and another being paralyzed in recent years. If you drive, please take time to learn how to drive properly, drive slowly, keep up with motorcycle maintenance, and never drink and drive. Tuk-tuks These are the smaller three-wheeled vehicles that look like overgrown golf carts, but sound like a chainsaw! Tuk-tuks are a fast and easy way to get from one place to another, but you’ll usually pay more for the convenience, typically from 120 to 200 baht. Taxis In the past several years Bangkok-style metered taxis have sprung up in Chiang Mai. The base fare is 40 baht, so expect to pay between 60-100 for a typical ride around town. Taxis still aren’t nearly as ubiquitous as in Bangkok, so you may have to call for a pick-up. You can call Lanna Taxi at 053 279- 291 24 hours a day. Lanna Taxi charges an additional 20 baht charge for this service. Bus Station Arcade Bus Station, on Kaeo Nawarat Road 053 242 664 Chiang Mai Train Station Chareon Muang Road (2km from Thapae Gate) 053 304 805 Chiang Mai International Airport 053 270 222 Grab Taxi: Through the Application https://www.grab.com/th/en/ Red Taxi: - Mr. Jiw: 0897017850; Mr. Ruut: 0857138957 When You Have Free Time... Nancy Chandler’s Map of Chiang Mai is recommended. It can be found in most bookstores in Chiang Mai. It’s a detailed, colorful, quirky map that comes in handy when looking for unique places to explore.
  33. 33. Page 33 of 40 A general caveat: most Chiang Mai people themselves don’t know the names of many city streets and almost never use maps. Things in Chiang Mai are “placed” by their proximity to landmarks, such as city gates, temples, schools, big stores, etc., so keep this in mind when you can’t find a Thai person who can tell you the street you’re on, or are as lost as you trying to figure out a city map. Museums Chiang Mai City Arts and Cultural Center 8:30 am to 5:00 pm except Monday. 90 baht. 053 217 793 Housed in the former Chiang Mai Provincial Government center, this museum focuses on Chiang Mai’s cultural and artistic heritage. Occasional art exhibitions. Exactly in the middle of town (3 Kings Monument). Chiang Mai National Museum Wed-Sun 9am-4pm, 30 baht. Located next to Wat Jet Yod, on the Chiang Mai-Lampang Superhighway. A thorough depiction of ancient Lanna art and culture from the 14th century to modern times, with particular focus on Thai religious art. The Tribal Museum and Ratchamangkla Park daily 9am-4pm; free Located on the Chiang Mai-Mae Rim Road. A beautiful spot. This Chinese pagoda style building is set overlooking a tree- lined lake. A great place to learn about northern Thailand’s hill tribe population. The Chiang Mai University Art Museum Tues-Sun 9:30 am-5 pm; free Located across from the Ton Payom Market, on Suthep Road. Supports the city’s local artistic community. International movies are shown every Saturday. Sign up at the museum if you would like to receive schedules of upcoming events by mail or email. Buddhist Temples Wat Jet Yod Near the Chiang Mai National Museum, on superhighway. Wat Phra Sing At the end of Ratchadamnoen Road near Suan Dok gate. Wat Chedi Luang Off Phra Pokklao Road. Wat Suan Dok
  34. 34. Page 34 of 40 www.monkchat.net across from Maharaj Hospital on Suthep Rd. English monk chat every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 5-7pm. Meditation retreats (in English) every Tuesday. Wat Umong West on Suthep Rd for 2km, then follow signs for another 2km after turning left at sign for Phayom Market. Wat Chiang Man Chiang Mai’s oldest temple. At intersection of Wiangkaew and Ratchapakinai Roads. Zoos, Cinéma, Shopping, and Other Attractions Chiang Mai Zoo Open daily 8am-7pm, last entry 5pm; 30 baht for adults A 36-acre park set on rolling hills, just past Chiang Mai University on Huay Kaew Road. Pandas are the top draw. Chiang Mai Night Safari www.chiangmainightsafari.com Brainchild of Prime Minister Taksin, the Night Safari offers tours of nocturnal animals on a large “natural” compound. Film Chiang Mai Film Space 3rd floor/roof CMU art museum 053 944846 x22, 081-7404077 www.cmartfilm.com free art / independent films Saturday evenings Major Cineplex Shopping Fun and cheap spots: (Learn to bargain!!) Night Bazaar Chang Klan Road, right off Thapae Road. Starts around 5pm Wararot Market Along the river, immediately north of Thapae Road Sunday Walking Street Market The road from Wat Pra Singh to Thapae gate is closed to all traffic every Sunday, from ~3pm to around 10pm. Shopping Malls / Superstores: (more expensive, set prices) Central Airport Plaza (Locals will often refer to it as just “Airport,” or “Robinson”) Kad Suan Kaew Shopping Centre (confusingly, most commonly called “Central”) Big C, Tesco Lotus Along the superhighway at different points. Easy Walking Map Our first attempt at publication some eleven years ago took the form of a tiny one-colour A4 map of the Old City on one side and 'east of the Thapae Gate to Night Bazaar' on the other. So the "Easy Walking Map" was formed, replete with a short guided tour. The inner, moated, Old City largely remains a place where graceful Buddhist temples are accessible from the road and wooden time-weathered houses are still to be seen along the busy streets. Over 30 temples within the Old City still remain fully active.
  35. 35. Page 35 of 40 Walking Map of Chiang Mai, Thailand Chiang Mai Tourism Information TAT Northern Office:Region 1, Tourism Authority Of Thailand 105/1 Chiangmai-Lamphun Road, Amphur Muang, Chiangmai 50000 Tel: (66 53) 248 604, 248 607, 241 466 Fax: (66 53) 248 605 Email: tatcnx@samart.co.th Areas of Responsibility : Chiangmai, Lamphun, Lampang, Mae Hong Son
  36. 36. Page 36 of 40 CHAPTER 6: Church of Christ in Thailand (CCT) – Chiang Mai Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_Christ_in_Thailand The Church of Christ in Thailand (C.C.T.) (Thai: สภาคริสตจักรในประเทศไทย) is a Protestant Christian association. It is the largest Protestant denomination in Thailand and is considered to be the largest by group of Protestant members in Thailand. CCT 75th Anniversary Building Map Source: https://wego.here.com/directions/mix//75Th-Anniversary-Building,-the-Church-of-Christ-in-Thailand-At-Chiangmai,-Chiang-Mai,-Thailand:e- eyJuYW1lIjoiNzVUaCBBbm5pdmVyc2FyeSBCdWlsZGluZywgdGhlIENodXJjaCBvZiBDaHJpc3QgaW4gVGhhaWxhbmQgQXQgQ2hpYW5nbWFpIiwiYWRkcmVzcyI6IkNoaWFuZyBNYWksIFRoYWlsYW5kIiwibGF0aXR1ZGUiOjE4Ljgw MDI1NTYyNDI1NCwib G9uZ2l0dWRlIjo5OS4 wMDY2NjE5NDk2Ny wicHJvdmlkZXJOYW1l IjoiZmFjZWJvb2siLCJ wcm92aWRlcklkIjozO TI1NTc1Njc1NTQ5OT Z9?map=18.80026,99 .00666,15,normal&fb _locale=en_GB
  37. 37. Page 37 of 40 CHAPTER 6: Payap University: At a Glance Source: http://ic.payap.ac.th/about-page/ Located on three campuses in the second largest city in Thailand, Payap University (Payap) is a young institution with an old history. In the 19th century, Westerners came to the once independent Kingdom of Chiang Mai as government officials, missionaries, and representatives of British companies. At the time, Chiang Mai, situated in the northern part of the country, was a two to three month journey from Bangkok. In 1828, American missionaries established modern education in what was then known as Siam. These back porch classes and home schools developed into half a dozen full-fledged elementary and high schools for both boys and girls. Persistent dreams for an accredited institution of higher education were fulfilled in 1974 when the Royal Thai Government gave permission to the Church of Christ in Thailand to establish Payap College. Payap incorporates the McGilvary Faculty of Theology (now the McGilvary College of Divinity) dating to 1888, and the McCormick Faculty of Nursing, going back to 1923. Representatives of the two schools, together with representatives of the Church of Christ in Thailand, the American Presbyterian Mission, and the Disciples Division of Overseas Ministries, formulated and submitted articles of incorporation to the Thai government. Payap College was approved and accredited on 21 March, 1974. The oldest of Payap’s three campuses is the Kaeo Nawarat Campus, home to the first seminary in Chiang Mai and the spiritual heart of the University. Another missionary endeavor, the nursing school, also began on this campus. From these two faculties came the University’s emphasis on outreach. The Music Department and the Christian Communications Institute are also on this campus today and continue the early tradition of concern for the people of Northern Thailand. The University Archives building is also located here. The Crystal Springs Campus (known locally as BaanTan Kaeo) contains visiting faculty housing and a guest house in a pleasant, walled garden setting. Located near the old abandoned city of Seven Fountains, which predates Chiang Mai itself, the name reminds us of the importance the Thai people place on water. The office of the Institute for the Study of Religion and Culture is also located on this campus. The newest campus, Mae Khao, was built on the ancient rice fields of traditional rural Thailand. At the campus center is the Luce Chapel, symbolic of a lotus rising out of the water. Ample space remains here for continued growth and expansion as Chiang Mai enters its eighth century; much construction is now underway to expand the campus further north. A new library opened in June 2005 and currently a new international student dormitory is under construction. Payap is quickly becoming an academic institution that responds to the needs of students in Northern Thailand in the 21st century. Most maps of Chiang Mai show the three Payap campuses or, at least, the two major ones. The main campus, Mae Khao, is in the northeast quadrant ofthe city. The turn for the campus is north on the Superhighway between the Kaeo Nawarat and Charoen Muang intersections. The Kaeo Nawarat Campus is on the northern side of the street of the same name, approximately two kilometers south of the Superhighway, and the Crystal Springs Campus (Baan Tan Kaeo) is on the north side of Huay Kaeo Road on the western side of town, halfway between the downtown moat and the mountain, Doi Suthep. Founded Payap College was established in 1974 and granted university status in 1984. Its roots, through the McGilvary Faculty of Theology, can be traced back to 1888.
  38. 38. Page 38 of 40 Location Chiang Mai, Thailand Type Private, Coed, Liberal Arts and Pre-professional. Accreditation and Memberships Payap is approved by the Ministry of University Affairs in Thailand and is a founding member of the Association of Private Higher Education Institutions or Thailand, an active member of the Association of Christian Universities and Colleges in Asia, and the Association of Southeast Asian Institutions of Higher Learning. Campuses Mae Khao Campus has 120 acres with 21 buildings housing classrooms, administrative offices and laboratories. The Luce Chapel, the Center for Culture and Arts, the Institute for Religion, Culture, and Peace, and the main university library are located here, as well as the Faculties of Humanities, Social Science, Business Administration, Accountancy/Finance/Banking, and Science. Across the Chiang Mai Ring Road, the Mae Khao Campus is currently home to the Law Building, the Paradornparp International House, the Alpha and Omega student dormitories, a food court, basketball and badminton courts, and a small chapel. Kaew Nawarat Campus, located opposite McCormick Hospital, has 16 buildings, and is home to the Faculties of Theology, Nursing, and Music. The University Archives and the Christian Communications Institute are also housed on this campus. Crystal Springs is a four-acre enclave northwest of the old city. The Crystal Springs Guest House provides affordable and pleasant accommodations for Payap visitors. Libraries The Sirindhorn Learning Resource Center (main library) is on the Mae Khao Campus, housing more than 100,000 books, 400 periodicals and journals, and a multimedia room. Residence Halls There are three main dormitories at the Mae Khao campus: Paradornparp International House, Alpha Women’s Dormitory, and Omega Men’s Dormitory. Most students studying in the Institute for Southeast Asian Studies live in the Paradornparp International House. For more information, see Housing and Dining below. The Center for Arts and Culture The Lanna-style building on the Mae Khao Campus is a center for research, documents, and programming for the culture, art, and music of Thailand, with a focus on Northern Thailand. Often the Thai Dance class is taught here. Transportation In Payap University Buildings The Sky Blue is free transportation to the academic buildings during office hours are Monday through Friday, 8:30 – 12:00 AM and 1:00 – 6:00 PM.
  39. 39. Page 39 of 40 Free Sky Blue Transportation to and from CCA and Paradornparp International House Payap University Location Payap University is located in Chiangmai, Thailand’s “second city,” the unofficial capital of the North. There are 2 main campuses: Mae Khao Campus Located just east of the city ring road, is the largest campus with 120 acres housing classrooms, administrative offices, and laboratories. The Luce Chapel, Center for Arts and Culture, the Research and Development Institute, and the University Central Library are located here, as well as the faculties of Humanities, Social Science, Business Administration, Science, Law, Accountancy, Finance and Banking, Pharmacy, and the Graduate School. The University Archives, the Christian Communication Institute (CCI), the Linguistics Institute, and the Institute of Religion, Culture and Peace. Address: Payap University Super-highway Chiang Mai – Lumpang Road, Amphur Muang, Chiang Mai, 50000 THAILAND Tel.: [66] 053 – 851478 Fax : [66] 053 – 241983 Kaew Nawarat Campus A small campus located in town, across from Payap-affiliated McCormick Hospital. The McGilvary Faculty of Theology, the McCormick Faculty of Nursing, and the Faculty of Music are located here.
  40. 40. Page 40 of 40 Address: Payap University Kaew Nawarat Road, Amphur Muang, Chiangmai, 50000 THAILAND Tel.: [66] 053 – 242484, [66] 053 – 243969, [66] 053 – 306512 – 3

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