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Design of Exergames with
the Collaborative
Participation of Older Adults
Characteristics of Healthy Elder
They natural decay, diseases and
physical dependence do not lead to a
major impediments t...
General Characteristics of the Elderly
PHYSICAL ASPECTS PSYCHOLOGICAL-AFFECTIVE ASPECTS
(Alba et al, 2001; Glanz et al, 20...
Social interaction among elder’s gamers
Metaphors
Roles emerged from game structure
Rhetoric
Roles brought into the game f...
Methodology
Requirements analysis
Summary: The exercise
-Should not cause harm or pain
-The exertion must be controlled
-It has to pro...
Preferences and issues (older
adults)
Action Research
[17]
Iteration 1.
Social
Behavior
Observe gamer’s
engagement and classify
them based on their level
of participation
Some elder...
Iteration 2.
Exertion perceived
Analyze motion promoted
in game interface and
provide with new
facilitators movements to
g...
Iteration 3.
Effectiveness
Classify gamers’ motion
capacity using enabled
elements in game design
and adequate the
gamepla...
Iteration 4.
Social Game
Include new warm up
session
Use simple casual games
to improve performances
Provide continuous
fe...
Adaptability
Conclusions
• We presented a long-term case study applying the Action Research
methodology
• The exergames’ design makes c...
Future work
• Define a player classification based on joint’s arcs of movements, a
simple balance test and speed of neurom...
Thanks for your attention
References
• [1] C. Hall, L. Brody, Terapheutic exercise moving toward function
• Editorial Paidotribo, 2006.
• [2] J. Mad...
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Exergames for Older Adults an adaptive and cooperative approach

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Presentation of the HCI study and Adaptive approach designing exergames for older adults gamers

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Exergames for Older Adults an adaptive and cooperative approach

  1. 1. Design of Exergames with the Collaborative Participation of Older Adults
  2. 2. Characteristics of Healthy Elder They natural decay, diseases and physical dependence do not lead to a major impediments to perform daily life activities Great heterogeneity in functional condition among peers Functional decay often is accelerated as result of depressive states and sedentary lifestyle. Muscular disuse slows the neuromuscular response, reduces strength in movement and loss of balance. [1]
  3. 3. General Characteristics of the Elderly PHYSICAL ASPECTS PSYCHOLOGICAL-AFFECTIVE ASPECTS (Alba et al, 2001; Glanz et al, 2008; Wilson-Escalante et al,2009; INGER,2010) 3
  4. 4. Social interaction among elder’s gamers Metaphors Roles emerged from game structure Rhetoric Roles brought into the game from outside Friendship Fellowship [2,3,6,7,8,9]
  5. 5. Methodology
  6. 6. Requirements analysis Summary: The exercise -Should not cause harm or pain -The exertion must be controlled -It has to produce a benefit, avoiding fatigue -It must be based on physical capacity -There should be a design of an exercise baseline -There should be goals and progress differentiated by level of capacity
  7. 7. Preferences and issues (older adults)
  8. 8. Action Research [17]
  9. 9. Iteration 1. Social Behavior Observe gamer’s engagement and classify them based on their level of participation Some elders have tendency to isolate themselves Group support is not enough to engage all participants Easy metaphors facilitate elder effectiveness Peer’s effectiveness is perceived as “easy to play” More movement increases social participation Replace pictorial instructions with mimics of movements Promote that more skilled games helps to less skilled ones. Integrate observers to playground area. Entrance Action planning Intervention Evaluation
  10. 10. Iteration 2. Exertion perceived Analyze motion promoted in game interface and provide with new facilitators movements to gamer Provide facilitators movements to less skilled gamers increase movement level in games selected Human instructing increases the number of active gamers. Few active gamers were highly participatory. Physical limitations implies more time to control the gameplay Designed facilitators movements, modify playground area to teach these movements and promote coach figure Entrance Action planning Intervention Evaluation
  11. 11. Iteration 3. Effectiveness Classify gamers’ motion capacity using enabled elements in game design and adequate the gameplay based on the classification Is necessary re build metaphors using a rhetoric adequate for each level of motion capacity. There was no more passive players. The group’s clustering helps to identify adequate motion, risk and tiredness during game time. However some gamer seems ashamed with their low performances Evaluated the functional capacity using joint’s arcs of motion and a simple test of balance. The group was clustered in four subgroups and for each cluster were re expressed the movements Entrance Action planning Intervention Evaluation
  12. 12. Iteration 4. Social Game Include new warm up session Use simple casual games to improve performances Provide continuous feedback about bad practices Change peer to peer challenges by group challenges. Use cooperative play rather than competition. Leveling gamers lets hide low performances Highly engaged group with exergames. Efficacy in game improves social interaction. The gamers feels more confident with their motion. Leveling scores using handicaps. Replace individual scores for group scores. Use a cooperative gameplay rather individual competition Diagnosis Action planning Intervention Evaluation
  13. 13. Adaptability
  14. 14. Conclusions • We presented a long-term case study applying the Action Research methodology • The exergames’ design makes compete all gamers under the same conditions supposing than all gamer all needs is time and practice • The gesture detection needs to take into account the gamer mobility capacity classification and adapt the gameplay to this context • Cooperative gameplay and a the design oriented to spectator increases the game engagement
  15. 15. Future work • Define a player classification based on joint’s arcs of movements, a simple balance test and speed of neuromuscular response • Design gameplay adaptability and develop a prototype of an exergame for older adults using this classification • Establish design principles for cooperative play and observer-oriented design of exergames
  16. 16. Thanks for your attention
  17. 17. References • [1] C. Hall, L. Brody, Terapheutic exercise moving toward function • Editorial Paidotribo, 2006. • [2] J. Madrigal, Benefits in the quality of life of women between 50 and 81 years of age participating in a group physical recreation program in Journal Education, 34(2), pp. 111- 132, July-December 2010. • [3] D.A. Leiberman, B. Chamberlin, E. Medina, The Power of Play: Innovations in Getting Active Summit 2011: A Science Panel Proceedings Report From the American Heart Association. Circulation.;123:1–10, 2011. • [4] J. Garcia, K. Felix, E. Lawrence, Serious Games to Improve the Physical Health of the Elderly: A Categorization Scheme. CENTRIC 2011; The Fourth International Conference on Advances in Human oriented and Personalized Mechanisms, Technologies, and Services, • pp. 64-71, October 2011. • [5] T. Campbell, B. Ngo, J. Fogarty, Game Design Principles in Every Fitness Applications. CSCW2008 Proceedings of the 2008 ACM conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, pp. 249-252, • 2008. • [6] A. Voida, S. Greenberg, Wii All Play: The Console as a Computational Meeting Place. CHI 2009 New gaming expiriences, pp. 1559-1568, April 2009. • [7] D. Harley, G. Fitspatrick, L. Axelrod, G. White, G. Mc Allister, Making the Wii at Home: Game Play by Older People in Sheltered Housing. USAB’10 Proceedings of the 6th international conference on HCI in work and learning, life and leisure: workgroup humancomputer interaction and usability engineering, pp. 156-176, 2010 • [8] E. Brox, L. Fernandez-Luque, T. Tøllefsen, Healthy Gaming – Video Game Design to promote Health. Appl Clin Inf 2011; 2: 128–142, 2011. http://dx.doi.org/10.4338/ACI- 2010-10-R-0060 • [9] R. Koster, A Theory of Fun for Game Design. Scottsdale: Paraglyph. 2004. • [17] R. Davison, M. Martinsons, Principles of canonical research in Journal Information Systems, 6, January 2004.

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