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Sculptures

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brief on role of sculptures in interiors

Published in: Design
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Sculptures

  1. 1. INTERIOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES ROLE OF SCULPTURES IN INTERIORS
  2. 2. • The art of sculpture is the branch of the visual arts that is especially concerned with the creation of form in three dimensions. An enormous variety of media may be used, including clay, wax, stone, metal, fabric, glass, wood , plaster, rubber, and random “found” objects. Materials may be carved, modeled, molded, cast, wrought, welded, sewn, assembled, or
  3. 3. The three main types of sculpture are assemblage, in the round, and relief. • A sculpture in the round is a separate, detached object in its own right, leading the same kind of independent existence in space as a human body or a chair. In other words a free standing solid piece surrounded on all four sides by empty space. • A relief does not have this kind of independence. It projects from and is attached to or is an integral part of something else that serves either as a background against which it is set or a matrix from which it emerges. A relief sculpture is a form or picture that projects out from or is mounted on a vertical surface. • Assemblage is a sculpture, free standing like in the round, but made of different objects put together. In the round Relief Assemblage
  4. 4. The actual three-dimensionality of sculpture in the round limits its scope in certain respects in comparison with the scope of painting Sculpture cannot conjure the illusion of space by purely optical means or invest its forms with atmosphere and light as painting can. Sculptures has been used to express a vast range of human emotions and feelings from the most tender and delicate to the most violent and ecstatic. The interior in Villa Foscori by Palladio in Venice is elegantly simple while Zellitto’s elorborate frescoes introduce rich detail in illusionistic perspective.
  5. 5. SCULPTURE IN INTERIOR DESIGN • They fall into the category of accessories used to furnish a space. • Accessories –refers to objects useful, decorative or both , that maybe added to the interior over and above basic furniture and equipment which are usually portable. • Accessories- practical accessories - candle sticks, tableware, pillow covers , clocks etc decorative accessories - live plants, art works like paintings, sculptures etc • They add to the interest and aesthetic quality of a space while reducing a sense of incompleteness Sculptures have a kind of reality, a vivid physical presence that is denied to the pictorial arts like paintings and wall hangings. The forms of sculpture are tangible as well as visible, and they can appeal strongly and directly to both tactile and visual sensibilities.
  6. 6. All three-dimensional forms are perceived as having an expressive character as well as purely geometric properties. They strike the observer as delicate, aggressive, flowing, taut, relaxed, dynamic, soft etc. Any sculptor, intimately involved with the world of three-dimensional form, learn something of its structural and expressive properties and develop emotional responses to them. This combination of understanding and sensitive response, often called a sense of form, can be cultivated and refined. It is to this sense of form that the art of sculpture primarily appeals. Hence the work of a designer solely involves in undersatnding the sculpture’s visual quality and its incorporation into the right space.
  7. 7. • By exploiting the expressive qualities of form, a designer is able to create images -- in which subject matter i.e the theme or ambience of the space and expressiveness of form are mutually reinforcing. • Such images go beyond the mere presentation of fact and communicate a wide range of subtle and powerful feelings. • The aesthetic raw material of sculpture is, so to speak, the whole realm of the expressive three- SELDdOiRmFe AnRsCioHnITalE CfoTrSm m. erged two apartments with this pair of black staircases. The pair of urn-like sculptures echo its duality, as do the sets of chairs, lamps, and wall of bookshelves. This home office with an Egyptian styled furniture setting is enhanced by the sphinx sculpture on the table. The classical urn and sculptures complement the décor.
  8. 8. In the home of a serious art collector, pieces are often displayed as they would be in a gallery or a museum. In this entrance area of a private home in New York , art objects are exhibited and lighted with care. Raised on a transparent stand the calder moble at the left showa its lines to the best advantage, while the picasso ceramic in the foreground occupies a museum style case. Positioning sculptures involves relating the space available, the objects to be displayed, and the desired levels of viewer’s attention.
  9. 9. Arbitrarily introducing decorative accessories for no reason other than to fill space or add interest will well add nothing more than clutter.in doubt full situations it is better to omit display. Errors of omission are far more common than errors of excessive inclusions. Inclusions should perhaps be reserved for times when occupants demand certain objects for display or the projection for a particular atmosphere or spirit calls for visual support. Parvathy Compiled by: Venkateswaran Revathy Royer Shirn Jageer

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