www.restaurantinclearwater.comARTICLES         Pizza in The United StatesThere are approximately 3 billion pizzas sold ann...
The United States has developed quite a large number of regional forms of pizza, manybearing only a casual resemblance to ...
By Kerri-Ann Jennings, M.S., R.D.As a registered dietitian and associate nutrition editor at EatingWell Magazine, I know t...
Chile PeppersMay help: Boost metabolism.Chile peppers add a much-appreciated heat to chilly-weather dishes, and they can a...
Turmeric, the goldenrod-colored spice, is used in India to help wounds heal (its applied as a paste);its also made into a ...
preliminary research suggests the herb may improve some symptoms of early Alzheimers disease bypreventing a key enzyme fro...
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Pizza in Usa

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Pizza in Usa

  1. 1. www.restaurantinclearwater.comARTICLES Pizza in The United StatesThere are approximately 3 billion pizzas sold annually in the United States from anestimated 60,000 pizza parlors. It is said that pizzerias represent 17 percent of allrestaurants in the country.History of pizzaFrom WikipediaThe Ancient Greeks covered their bread with oils, herbs and cheese. In ByzantineGreek, the word was spelled πίτα or pita, meaning pie. The word has now spreadto Turkish as pide, Serbo-Croatian and Bulgarian as pita, Albanian as pite and ModernHebrew pittāh. The Romans developed placenta, a sheet of flour topped with cheeseand honey and flavored with bay leaves. Modern pizza originated in Italy as theNeapolitan pie with tomato. In 1889, cheese was added.King Ferdinand I (1751–1825) is said to have disguised himself as a commoner and, inclandestine fashion, visited a poor neighborhood in Naples. One story has it that hewanted to sink his teeth into a food that the queen had banned from the royal court—pizza.In 1889, during a visit to Naples, Queen Margherita of Italy was served a pizzaresembling the colors of the Italian flag, red (tomato), white (mozzarella) and green(basil). This kind of pizza has been named after the Queen as Pizza Margherita.
  2. 2. The United States has developed quite a large number of regional forms of pizza, manybearing only a casual resemblance to the Italian original. During the latter half of the20th century, pizza in the United States became an iconic dish of considerablepopularity. The thickness of the crust depends on what the consumer prefers; both thickand thin crust are popular. Often, "Americanized" foods such as barbecued chicken andbacon cheeseburgers are used to create new types of pizza.There are many pizzas but some of them are given below:Sunny Side Up Pizza / BBQ Chicken Pizza / Muffuletta Pizza / Frozen Peanut Butter PizzaMargherita Pizza / Caramelized Onion Pizza / Cheese Calzone / Thai PizzaGrilled Pizza / Pizza Pie / Roasted Garlic and Peppers / Broccoli Deep Dish PizzaChicago Style Pizza / Philly Cheesesteak Pizza / Seafood Pizza / Pesto PizzaTex-Mex Pizza / Fruit PizzaFrom Wikipedia 8 of the World’s healthiest Spices & Herbs You Should Be EatingBy The Editors of ―EatingWell Magazine‖
  3. 3. By Kerri-Ann Jennings, M.S., R.D.As a registered dietitian and associate nutrition editor at EatingWell Magazine, I know thatherbs andspices do more than simply add flavor to food. They let you cut down on some less-healthyingredients, such as salt, added sugars and saturated fat, and some have inherent health benefits,many of which Joyce Hendley reported on for EatingWell Magazine.Modern science is beginning to uncover the ultimate power of spices and herbs, as weapons againstillnesses from cancer to Alzheimers disease. "Were now starting to see a scientific basis for whypeople have been using spices medicinally for thousands of years," says Bharat Aggarwal, Ph.D.,professor at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston and author of HealingSpices (Sterling, 2011).Aggarwal notes that in his native India, where spices tend to be used by the handful, incidence ofdiet-related diseases like heart disease and cancer have long been low. But when Indians move awayand adopt more Westernized eating patterns, their rates of those diseases rise. While researchersusually blame the meatier, fattier nature of Western diets, Aggarwal and other experts believe thatherbs and spices-or more precisely, the lack of them-are also an important piece of the dietarypuzzle. "When Indians eat more Westernized foods, theyre getting much fewer spices than theirtraditional diet contains," he explains. "They lose the protection those spices are conveying."While science has yet to show that any spice cures disease, theres compelling evidence that severalmay help manage some chronic conditions (though its always smart to talk with your doctor).Whats not to love? Here weve gathered eight of the healthiest spices and herbs enjoyed around theworld.
  4. 4. Chile PeppersMay help: Boost metabolism.Chile peppers add a much-appreciated heat to chilly-weather dishes, and they can also give a boost toyour metabolism. Thank capsaicin, the compound that gives fresh chiles, and spices includingcayenne and chipotle, their kick. Studies show that capsaicin can increase the bodys metabolic rate(causing one to burn more calories) and may stimulate brain chemicals that help us feel less hungry.In fact, one study found that people ate 16 percent fewer calories at a meal if theyd sipped a hot-pepper-spiked tomato juice (vs. plain tomato juice) half an hour earlier. Recent research found thatcapsinoids, similar but gentler chemicals found in milder chile hybrids, have the same effects-so eventamer sweet paprika packs a healthy punch. Capsaicin may also lower risk of ulcers by boosting theability of stomach cells to resist infection by ulcer-causing bacteria and help the heart by keeping"bad" LDL cholesterol from turning into a more lethal, artery-clogging form.GingerMay help: Soothe an upset stomach, fight arthritis pain.Ginger has a well-deserved reputation for relieving an unsettled stomach. Studies show gingerextracts can help reduce nausea caused by morning sickness or following surgery or chemotherapy,though its less effective for motion sickness. But ginger is also packed with inflammation-fightingcompounds, such as gingerols, which some experts believe may hold promise in fighting somecancers and may reduce the aches of osteoarthritis and soothe sore muscles. In a recent study, peoplewho took ginger capsules daily for 11 days reported 25 percent less muscle pain when they performedexercises designed to strain their muscles (compared with a similar group taking placebo capsules).Another study found that ginger-extract injections helped relieve osteoarthritis pain of the knee.CinnamonMay help: Stabilize blood sugar.A few studies suggest that adding cinnamon to food-up to a teaspoon a day, usually given in capsuleform-might help people with type 2 diabetes better control their blood sugar, by lowering post-mealblood-sugar spikes. Other studies suggest the effects are limited at best.TurmericMay help: Quell inflammation, inhibit tumors.
  5. 5. Turmeric, the goldenrod-colored spice, is used in India to help wounds heal (its applied as a paste);its also made into a tea to relieve colds and respiratory problems. Modern medicine confirms somesolid-gold health benefits as well; most are associated with curcumin, a compound in turmeric thathas potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Curcumin has been shown to help relievepain of arthritis, injuries and dental procedures; its also being studied for its potential in managingheart disease, diabetes and Alzheimers disease. Researcher Bharat Aggarwal is bullish on curcuminspotential as a cancer treatment, particularly in colon, prostate and breast cancers; preliminarystudies have found that curcumin can inhibit tumor cell growth and suppress enzymes that activatecarcinogens.SaffronMay help: Lift your mood.Saffron has long been used in traditional Persian medicine as a mood lifter, usually steeped into amedicinal tea or used to prepare rice. Research from Irans Roozbeh Psychiatric Hospital at TehranUniversity of Medical Sciences has found that saffron may help to relieve symptoms of premenstrualsyndrome (PMS) and depression. In one study, 75% of women with PMS who were given saffroncapsules daily reported that their PMS symptoms (such as mood swings and depression) declined byat least half, compared with only 8 percent of women who didnt take saffron.ParsleyMay help: Inhibit breast cancer-cell growth.University of Missouri scientists found that this herb can actually inhibit breast cancer-cell growth,reported Holly Pevzner in the September/October 2011 issue of EatingWell Magazine. In the study,animals that were given apigenin, a compound abundant in parsley (and in celery), boosted theirresistance to developing cancerous tumors. Experts recommend adding a couple pinches of mincedfresh parsley to your dishes daily.SageMay help: Preserve memory, soothe sore throats.Herbalists recommend sipping sage tea for upset stomachs and sore throats, a remedy supported byone study that found spraying sore throats with a sage solution gave effective pain relief. And
  6. 6. preliminary research suggests the herb may improve some symptoms of early Alzheimers disease bypreventing a key enzyme from destroying acetylcholine, a brain chemical involved in memory andlearning. In another study, college students who took sage extracts in capsule form performedsignificantly better on memory tests, and their moods improved.RosemaryMay help: Enhance mental focus, fight foodborne bacteria.One recent study found that people performed better on memory and alertness tests when mists ofaromatic rosemary oil were piped into their study cubicles. Rosemary is often used in marinades formeats and poultry, and theres scientific wisdom behind that tradition: rosmarinic acid and otherantioxidant compounds in the herb fight bacteria and prevent meat from spoiling, and may evenmake cooked meats healthier. In March 2010, Kansas State University researchers reported thatadding rosemary extracts to ground beef helped prevent the formation of heterocyclic amines(HCAs)-cancer-causing compounds produced when meats are grilled, broiled or fried.

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