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Rapid Cross-channel Prototyping Workshop IAS17

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The slides for the Rapid Cross-channel Prototyping Workshop I facilitated at the ASIS&T Information Architecture Summit in Vancouver, BC, March 23 2017

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Rapid Cross-channel Prototyping Workshop IAS17

  1. 1. ASIS&T INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE SUMMIT 2017 RAPID CROSS-CHANNEL PROTOTYPING Andreas @Resmini Vancouver, March 23 2017
  2. 2. WELCOME! we’ll work on a case and go step-by-step through the ins and outs of cross-channel experiences here’s a little breakdown of our activities for today
  3. 3. STAGE #0 (40mins) welcome, cross-channel and all that jazz a quick introduction to the idea of unbounded experiences and to our case
  4. 4. STAGE #1: PROBLEM SPACE (90mins) identifying actors and actor groups, actor goals, activities, mapping individual paths check, verify, discuss
  5. 5. STAGE #2: ECOSYSTEM DRAFT (90mins) mapping the ecosystem: how-to, initial draft, iterations LUNCH! check, verify, discuss
  6. 6. STAGE #3: MORE DIVERGENCE (30mins) round-robin draft ecosystem critique groups get to ask questions, comment, and critique what the other group have been doing
  7. 7. STAGE #4: ASSESSMENT (60mins) the ecosystem map is refined, challenges and opportunities are evaluated, a strategic plan laid out to respond to the initial goals and to the actors’ experience a specific touchpoint / artifact is singled out for intervention
  8. 8. STAGE #5: INTERVENTION (90mins) from ecosystem to artifact. Groups formulate the design or redesign of the touchpoint / artifact and evaluate how it will affect the ecosystem and the actors’ choices presentations, reflections, discussion, wrap-up
  9. 9. LUNCHSTASTAGE #1 GE #2 STAGE #3 STAGE #4 STAGE #5 STAGE #0 OVERVIEW
  10. 10. TAKE-AWAYS #1 understand the logic and nature of cross-channel ecosystems acquire an actor-centered view of experiences
  11. 11. TAKE-AWAYS #2 learn to identify and map actors, paths, touchpoints, and the seams between them into ecosystems
  12. 12. TAKE-AWAYS #3 learn how to create and use channels for systemic insights
  13. 13. TAKE-AWAYS #4 transform system-level information architecture into context- and touchpoint-specific insights for better user experience
  14. 14. TRADITIONALLY, DESIGN IMPLIES MAKING “THINGS” the design tradition of “making” has its roots in the craft making has been associated with “things” for a long time
  15. 15. THE DESIGN OF SOFTWARE INTERFACES an initial challenge to the idea of “making things” comes along with software interfaces between the ‘70s and the ‘80s interaction design produces “objects” that are not tangible
  16. 16. A SHIFT TOWARDS THE INTANGIBLE through the years, intangibles have become the norm design thinking and service design are an example of this shift, fields of practice and research that approach organizational processes and services via a design mindset
  17. 17. STILL MAKING “THINGS” regardless of (in)tangibility, all of these practices are still “traditional design” in the sense that they focus on producing an “object””: it might be a UI, a service, a process for managing patients in a hospital, a chair. Still, it’s a clearly bounded “thing”
  18. 18. CROSS-CHANNEL ECOSYSTEMS IMPLY A NEW FOCUS the design process here gets centered on “an experience” this shift brings in emergence, complexity, uncertainty, and the necessity to move to a bird’s-eye, strategic view it also brings whomever is having “an experience” center stage
  19. 19. HERE IS AN EXAMPLE Uber is a service. Sure. But: in the context of cross-channel design, Uber is a part of a larger ecosystem that is centered on personal transportation to me, Uber is a piece of “going somewhere for some purpose”
  20. 20. THAT’S THE EXPERIENCE unless you are plain interested in just riding Uber cars, that is (hobbies are hobbies. Who am I to judge, right?)
  21. 21. THAT MEANS UBER DOES NOT OWN IT ALL the experience itself is not owned nor it is fully managed or controlled by any single company or organization
  22. 22. NEITHER PRODUCT- NOR SERVICE-BOUNDED the experience does not stop where “Uber the service” stops Uber’s role also changes from completely marginal to absolutely central depending on my own ongoing experience
  23. 23. NEITHER DIGITAL NOR PHYSICAL, BUT BLENDED a cross-channel ecosystem creates a blended actionable space that straddles across digital and physical environments
  24. 24. THAT BLENDED SPACE is the ecosystem inside which a specific experience takes place
  25. 25. OK, BUT WHAT DO YOU MEAN, “AN EXPERIENCE”? think “paying my taxes”. Or “going to the movies”. Or again “having the hamster vaccinated”. These are experiences the way they happen, actors will go through them moving freely between locations, devices, products, and services
  26. 26. SMS BUS KIOSK HERE’S AN EXAMPLE: GOING TO THE MOVIES GREEN LINE AND CIRCLES: AN ACTOR’S PATH DESCRIBING AN EXPERIENCE IMDB MOVIE
  27. 27. WAIT AGAIN, “ACTORS”? yes, actors. The people formerly known as the users. a cross-channel ecosystem is an actor-driven construct, both in terms of its structure and its content
  28. 28. SO AN “ACTOR” GOES THROUGH “AN EXPERIENCE” yes, and the systems of actors, tasks, touchpoints, seams, and channels in which this experience takes place is the cross-channel ecosystem the actual path that an actor walks is one of the many possible trajectories through that specific ecosystem
  29. 29. actors, agents within the ecosystem youtube.com
  30. 30. all sorts of agents
  31. 31. actors pursue a future desired state alphasys.com.au
  32. 32. tasks, any activity these agents perform
  33. 33. touchpoints, individual points of interaction in a channel
  34. 34. seams, thresholds between touchpoints and across channels
  35. 35. channels, pervasive ecosystem-level information layers
  36. 36. and their relationships
  37. 37. ACTORS, TASKS, TOUCHPOINTS, SEAMS, AND CHANNELS? these are the basic building blocks of any ecosystem their precise nature is specific to an ecosystem and is defined pragmatically based on context and goals
  38. 38. OK. ACTORS FIRST we know actors very well. If we consider human actors, they are the people formerly known as the users (TPFKATU) the name change underlines their agency: they are the ones who effectively shape and create the ecosystem software agents are or can be actors as well, of course
  39. 39. VERY WELL. TASKS THEN tasks are all the activities actors perform in their pursuing any desired future state buying a ticket to go see a movie, for example, or logging in to an online system to pay their taxes tasks are usually coupled with progression through touchpoints
  40. 40. MH. TOUCHPOINTS? touchpoints are individual points-of-interaction that become part of the ecosystem as actors connect them freely to move on towards their desired future state touchpoints are medium-specific (digital, physical, biological)
  41. 41. WAIT. IS MY PHONE A TOUCHPOINT THEN? OR THE APP? both. Working with ecosystems implies adopting an architectural, systemic mindset and a zoom in/out approach granularity cannot be discussed or set in abstract, but has to reflect the project’s needs and scope at that moment
  42. 42. SEAMS seams are thresholds and connections if you can move from touchpoint A to touchpoint X, those two are permeable and share a seam seams allow the transmission and use of content and information circulating in the ecosystem
  43. 43. SEAMS HAVE INTERESTING PROPERTIES seams convey information, which is medium-aspecific, so they can connect touchpoints residing in different channels and living in different mediums seams can also of course connect touchpoints residing in totally different physical locations
  44. 44. OK, CHANNELS. NOW. channels are a design construct. They do not really exist the best way to imagine them is to think of pipes carrying information around the ecosystem wherever you have a tap, you have a touchpoint as much as taps live on pipes, touchpoints live on channels
  45. 45. PIPES? TAPS? channels are pervasive layers that carry information around the ecosystem, like pipes carry water around the way they are created is a design decision. They could reflect the formal sectioning of an EA model, be the result of the designers’ own biases and interpretation, or anything in between
  46. 46. CHANNELS CONTAIN INFORMATION. AND? that’s the catch. Channels are containers for specific “types” of information. These types can be compared to loose categories for example, a going-to-the-movie ecosystem could have a “movie-related” channel. In there you would find IMDB, a kiosk selling tickets, the website for the cinema, and staff
  47. 47. YES, BUT WHY ARE CHANNELS IMPORTANT? because we are working with information and our goal is to support better experiences if staff at the movie theater doesn’t know about tickets or a kiosk malfunction (that is, they do not live on the same channel and have no seams between them), we can be pretty sure that lack of connection will result in a bad experience
  48. 48. UH. AND THE ECOSYSTEM? the ecosystem is the product of the ontology, the conceptual boundaries used to organize the experience itself the ecosystem is a spatial structure in blended space, straddling non-continuous digital and physical environments its boundaries are arbitrary and depend on goals and context
  49. 49. NON-LINEAR ECOSYSTEMS VS LINEAR EXPERIENCE while the ecosystem itself is a non-linear network, actors trying to achieve a future desired state consider themselves moving along a personal, linear path of subsequent steps even more importantly, their experience is a linear narrative
  50. 50. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 A PATH THROUGH THE ECOSYSTEM GREEN LINE: ACTOR’S PATH THROUGH AN ECOSYSTEM COMPRISING 3 DIFFERENT SYSTEMS
  51. 51. THE ECOSYSTEM’S BACKBONE IS INFORMATION actors constantly create, remediate, and use information this information is transferred along the actor’s path and through the ecosystem, increasing its complexity designing a successful cross-channel experience means optimizing the information flows and increasing resilience
  52. 52. STAGE #1: PROBLEM SPACE (90mins) identifying actors and actor groups, actor goals, activities, mapping individual paths check, verify, discuss
  53. 53. LUNCHSTASTAGE #1 GE #2 STAGE #3 STAGE #4 STAGE #5 STAGE #0 OVERVIEW
  54. 54. OK, SO WHERE DO YOU START FROM? pragmatically, from the formulation of an individual, organizational, or social need or pain conceptually, from an actor’s experience
  55. 55. THE PRAGMATIC STARTING POINT is an organizational pain. “We need to increase the rate of paid to free subscriptions” “We need to improve our <x>” “We need to enter market <y>”
  56. 56. THE CONCEPTUAL STARTING POINT is what the actors do, *their* experience. There is no ecosystem if there is no actor experiencing it
  57. 57. WAIT A SECOND, THAT’S NOT AN ANSWER it is. While a certain project will be initiated because of a social, organizational, or individual need or pain, that need or pain is not what generates the ecosystem that need or pain is a problem space within an ecosystem that is usually, at project start, largely unknown
  58. 58. HERE YOU GO AGAIN. NEEDS AND PAINS? yes. Needs or pains are usually the reason an investigation starts examples of organizational pain are “not intercepting the actor’s path because they go to competitors”, “increase our paid-for vs free customer ratio”, or “enter the online grocery market” a social pain could be reduce traffic, or promote equality
  59. 59. NOT FOLLOWING. ONE MORE EXAMPLE? PLEASE? sure. That’s what our case for today is for suppose the chairs want to “make the summit great again” this need or desire to improve the summit experience is the organizational pain that acts as the catalyst for design
  60. 60. WE HAVE AN INITIAL PROBLEM SPACE what we need to know is who the actors are and what do they do and think so let’s start stage #1 and have everyone get on paper two different artifacts
  61. 61. INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT #1 what is the summit for you? (that is, what is your goal or goals?)
  62. 62. INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT #2 describe your summit experience (if this is your first time, describe what you’ve seen so far or describe your experience at another conference)
  63. 63. LUNCHSTASTAGE #1 GE #2 STAGE #3 STAGE #4 STAGE #5 STAGE #0 OVERVIEW STATE YOUR GOALS DESCRIBE YOUR JOURNEY
  64. 64. D. Willis, Intent Paths (2011) - https://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/albums/72157626618631035
  65. 65. D. Willis, Intent Paths (2011) - https://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/albums/72157626618631035
  66. 66. D. Willis, Intent Paths (2011) - https://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/albums/72157626618631035
  67. 67. D. Willis, Intent Paths (2011) - https://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/albums/72157626618631035
  68. 68. D. Willis, Intent Paths (2011) - https://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/albums/72157626618631035
  69. 69. PRIMARY SECONDARYTERTIARY
  70. 70. PRIMARY SECONDARYTERTIARY - + - +
  71. 71. PERSONAL LOCALREMOTE - + - +
  72. 72. GMaps actor phone phone info actor phone AR actor phone Accessing GMaps through phone Accessing local phone info Accessing AR through phone
  73. 73. Waiting for the bus at the bus stop: when does the bus arrive? actor bus stop person phoneFacebook
  74. 74. Waiting for the bus at the bus stop: when does the bus arrive? actor bus stop person phone actor bus app phone Facebook
  75. 75. Waiting for the bus at the bus stop: when does the bus arrive? actor bus driver person actor person bus stop phoneFacebook actor bus app phone
  76. 76. GROUP ARTIFACT #1 we have hexagons, markers, stickers let’s transform your goals and descriptions into paths
  77. 77. LUNCHSTASTAGE #1 GE #2 STAGE #3 STAGE #4 STAGE #5 STAGE #0 OVERVIEW STATE YOUR GOALS DESCRIBE YOUR JOURNEY MAKE PATHS
  78. 78. STAGE #2: ECOSYSTEM DRAFT (90mins) mapping the ecosystem: how-to, initial draft, iterations LUNCH! check, verify, discuss
  79. 79. LUNCHSTASTAGE #1 GE #2 STAGE #3 STAGE #4 STAGE #5 STAGE #0 OVERVIEW
  80. 80. WE HAVE OUR INDIVIDUAL PATHS now we need to merge them somehow and create an initial view of our current ecosystem
  81. 81. WE USE A SIMPLE VISUAL VOCABULARY we turn each and every touchpoint in a circle and every existing seam in a line, and give the seam a direction
  82. 82. SMS BUS KIOSK IMDB MOVIE HOME
  83. 83. A NOTE ABOUT SEAMS only attribute a direction you verified exists and is used in your descriptions
  84. 84. GROUP ARTIFACT #2 there’s more we can add to the map but let’s give this thing a go and learn while we do
  85. 85. LUNCHSTASTAGE #1 GE #2 STAGE #3 STAGE #4 STAGE #5 STAGE #0 OVERVIEW ECOSYSTEM DRAFT CHANNELS DRAFT
  86. 86. GROUP ARTIFACT #3 let’s make the ecosystem map better
  87. 87. GROUP ARTIFACT #4 now the hard part: the channels
  88. 88. REMEMBER WHAT WE SAID channels are a design construct. They do not really exist the best way to imagine them is to think of pipes carrying information around the ecosystem
  89. 89. THEY ARE A DESIGN ARTIFACT the way they are created is a design decision. They could reflect the formal sectioning of an EA model, be the result of the designers’ own biases and interpretation, or anything in between
  90. 90. EXAMPLES a going-to-the-movie ecosystem could have a “movie-related” channel containing IMDB, ticket kiosks, the website for the cinema, and possibly staff a conference experience could have an “official comm” channel most times it’s possible to identify physical, biological, and digital primary channels. They are also not usually very useful
  91. 91. REMEMBER: CHANNELS ARE IMPORTANT they allow us to visualize continuity or gaps in the information flows that actors totally miss or do not care about because they do not possess an ecosystem-level view
  92. 92. LUNCHSTASTAGE #1 GE #2 STAGE #3 STAGE #4 STAGE #5 STAGE #0 OVERVIEW ECOSYSTEM DRAFT CHANNELS DRAFT ECOSYSTEM REFINEMENT CHANNELS REFINEMENT
  93. 93. STAGE #3: MORE DIVERGENCE (30mins) round-robin draft ecosystem critique groups get to ask questions, comment, and critique what the other group have been doing
  94. 94. LUNCHSTASTAGE #1 GE #2 STAGE #3 STAGE #4 STAGE #5 STAGE #0 OVERVIEW CRITIQUE
  95. 95. TAKE A LOOK, GIVE FEEDBACK one group member remains to discuss, take notes, and explain the other members move to another table to give feedback we proceed until we complete a full rotation
  96. 96. USE THAT FEEDBACK TO REFINE YOUR MAP iterate your map once more
  97. 97. LUNCHSTASTAGE #1 GE #2 STAGE #3 STAGE #4 STAGE #5 STAGE #0 OVERVIEW CRITIQUE REFINEMENT
  98. 98. STAGE #4: ASSESSMENT (60mins) the ecosystem map is refined, challenges and opportunities are evaluated, a strategic plan laid out to respond to the initial goals and to the actors’ experience a specific touchpoint / artifact is singled out for intervention
  99. 99. LUNCHSTASTAGE #1 GE #2 STAGE #3 STAGE #4 STAGE #5 STAGE #0 OVERVIEW
  100. 100. STAGE #5: INTERVENTION (90mins) from ecosystem to artifact. Groups formulate the design or redesign of the touchpoint / artifact and evaluate how it will affect the ecosystem and the actors’ choices presentations, reflections, discussion, wrap-up
  101. 101. LUNCHSTASTAGE #1 GE #2 STAGE #3 STAGE #4 STAGE #5 STAGE #0 OVERVIEW
  102. 102. THANK YOU SO MUCH please remember to fill in the evaluation forms and do get in touch if you have questions, doubts, or want to share your own investigations. Ping me @resmini anytime have a great summit!

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