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Ghost in the Shell - Information Architecture in the Age of Postdigital

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My presentation at the IAS13, Baltimore.

Transcript

  1. 1. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE IN THE AGE OF POSTDIGITAL ANDREA @RESMINI GHOST IN THE SHELL
  2. 2. GHOST IN THE SHELL
  3. 3. GHOST IN THE SHELL
  4. 4. GHOST IN THE SHELL
  5. 5. GHOST IN THE SHELL THERE IS A NEW SPIRIT – Le Corbusier,Towards a New Architecture (1926)
  6. 6. GHOST IN THE SHELL COMPLEXITY
  7. 7. GHOST IN THE SHELL MULTIPLICITY COMPLEXITY
  8. 8. GHOST IN THE SHELL POSTDIGITAL MULTIPLICITY COMPLEXITY
  9. 9. GHOST IN THE SHELL POSTDIGITAL MULTIPLICITY COMPLEXITY ARCHITECTURE
  10. 10. GHOST IN THE SHELL COMPLEXITY
  11. 11. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE NPR.ORG
  12. 12. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE NPR.ORG COMPLICATED
  13. 13. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE
  14. 14. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE COMPLEX
  15. 15. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE COMPARISON
  16. 16. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE OVERSIZED
  17. 17. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE
  18. 18. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE
  19. 19. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE
  20. 20. GHOST IN THE SHELL A SYSTEM IS SIMPLE IF ALL ITS MODELS ARE SIMULABLE
  21. 21. GHOST IN THE SHELL A SYSTEM THAT IS NOT SIMPLE IS NON-SIMULABLE
  22. 22. GHOST IN THE SHELL A NON-SIMULABLE SYSTEM IS UNPREDICTABLE AND COMPLEX
  23. 23. GHOST IN THE SHELL City at night, K. Growford
  24. 24. GHOST IN THE SHELL
  25. 25. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE MULTIPLICITY
  26. 26. GHOST IN THE SHELL
  27. 27. GHOST IN THE SHELL THE WEB IS THE UNIFYING FACTOR FOR MANY DIFFERENT COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AND WILDLY DIFFERENT TYPES OF CONTENT – L. Rosenfeld & P. Morville, IA for the WWW
  28. 28. GHOST IN THE SHELL SYNCHRONIC
  29. 29. Andrea Resmini – Ghost in the Shell – 2013 IA Summit Computer room, Santa Barbara – http://is.gd/h4me67
  30. 30. GHOST IN THE SHELL COMPUTING WAS A SPECIFIC ACTIVITY STILL CONFINED TO CLEARLY IDENTIFIED BOUNDED AREAS IN SPACE AND TIME
  31. 31. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE NOT TODAY
  32. 32. GHOST IN THE SHELL ONCE THERE WAS A TIME AND PLACE FOR EVERYTHING: TODAY, THINGS ARE INCREASINGLY SMEARED ACROSS MULTIPLE SITES AND MOMENTS IN COMPLEX AND OFTEN INDETERMINATE WAYS – W. J. Mitchell
  33. 33. GHOST IN THE SHELL Wikimedia – http://is.gd/kOVmXy
  34. 34. GHOST IN THE SHELL 25.9
  35. 35. GHOST IN THE SHELL 39 ComScoreData. – http://www.comscoredatamine.com/2012/08/brits-most-engaged-online-audience-in- europe/
  36. 36. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE– A. Bartholl , Museum of Moving Image
  37. 37. GHOST IN THE SHELL Space Cube
  38. 38. GHOST IN THE SHELL Sheffield, toph3r http://www.flickr.com/photos/ahxcjb/3552828240/
  39. 39. GHOST IN THE SHELL Tablet use 2, ebayink – http://www.flickr.com/photos/ebayink/6816581064/
  40. 40. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE POSTDIGITAL
  41. 41. GHOST IN THE SHELL IS DIGITAL DESTINED FOR BANALITY? CERTAINLY – N. NEGROPONTE, BEYOND DIGITAL (1998)
  42. 42. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE
  43. 43. GHOST IN THE SHELL LIKE AIR AND DRINKING WATER, BEING DIGITAL WILL BE NOTICED ONLY BY ITS ABSENCE, NOT ITS PRESENCE – N. NEGROPONTE, BEYOND DIGITAL (1998)
  44. 44. GHOST IN THE SHELL IT WILL BECOME TOMORROW’S COMMERCIAL AND CULTURAL COMPOST FOR NEW IDEAS – N. NEGROPONTE, BEYOND DIGITAL (1998)
  45. 45. Andrea Resmini – Ghost in the Shell – 2013 IA Summit
  46. 46. GHOST IN THE SHELL THE WEB IS NOT A DESTINATION IN ITSELF BUT A ROUTE MAP TO SOMEWHERE REAL – S. Jenkins,Welcome to the post-digital world
  47. 47. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE ACTOR WEB SIGNS TABLET ACE PHONE KIOSK
  48. 48. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE
  49. 49. GHOST IN THE SHELL GHOST IN THE SHELL – Mamuro Oshii (1995)
  50. 50. GHOST IN THE SHELL
  51. 51. GHOST IN THE SHELL
  52. 52. GHOST IN THE SHELL GHOST IN THE MACHINE – Gilbert Ryle,The Concept of Mind (1949)
  53. 53. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE ARCHITECTURE
  54. 54. Andrea Resmini – Ghost in the Shell – 2013 IA Summit
  55. 55. Andrea Resmini – Ghost in the Shell – 2013 IA Summit
  56. 56. GHOST IN THE SHELL
  57. 57. GHOST IN THE SHELL THERE IS A NEW SPIRIT
  58. 58. GHOST IN THE SHELL Mercedes-Benz
  59. 59. GHOST IN THE SHELL Le Corbusier, grain silo, Canada
  60. 60. GHOST IN THE SHELL MODERN Le Corbusier,Ville Savoye
  61. 61. GHOST IN THE SHELL C. W. Moore, Piazza d'Italia
  62. 62. GHOST IN THE SHELL
  63. 63. GHOST IN THE SHELL
  64. 64. GHOST IN THE SHELL Living Exhibition, photo courtesy of L. Ciolfi
  65. 65. GHOST IN THE SHELL PSEUDOMODERN ARTIFACTS EXIST ONLY AS CONSTANTLY CO-PRODUCED AND REMEDIATED PROCESSES WHOSE CONTENT, MEANINGS AND DYNAMICS ARE SOCIALLY DETERMINED
  66. 66. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE
  67. 67. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE
  68. 68. GHOST IN THE SHELL
  69. 69. GHOST IN THE SHELL A C D B Z R K A C D B Z R W A C D B A C D B Z R K MODERN Z B AC D POSTMODERN POSTDIGITAL Adapted from T. Fenn, 2011
  70. 70. Andrea Resmini – Ghost in the Shell – 2013 IA Summit
  71. 71. Andrea Resmini – Ghost in the Shell – 2013 IA Summit
  72. 72. GHOST IN THE SHELL THERE IS A NEW SPIRIT
  73. 73. GHOST IN THE SHELL THE SPIRIT OF A DIFFERENT ORDER, BRINGING NOT UNITY BUT MULTIPLICITY AND COMPLEXITY
  74. 74. GHOST IN THE SHELL A SPIRIT BRIDGING OUR MANY DISEMBODIED SELF, CONNECTING PEOPLE, PLACES, OBJECTS THROUGH EVER-CHANGING SEMANTICS
  75. 75. GHOST IN THE SHELL A SPIRIT OF CONTEXT, PLACE AND MEANING, TRANSFORMING INFORMATION SPACES INTO DURABLE ARCHITECTURES
  76. 76. GHOST IN THE SHELL THE SPIRIT OF IA A SPIRIT OF SENSE-MAKING, RESHAPING REALITY AND CREATING NEW PLACES “FOR HUMAN BEINGS TO LIVE,WORK,AND PLAY IN”
  77. 77. GHOST IN THE SHELL THAT’S WHY INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE IS THE ARCHITECTURE OF POSTDIGITAL INFORMATION SPACES
  78. 78. GHOST IN THE SHELL
  79. 79. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE
  80. 80. GHOST IN THE SHELL THANKYOU

Editor's Notes

  • The best way to frame this conversation is through this tweet I sent a few months ago.
  • That prompted a quick reply from someone who has some responsibilities when it comes to making IA a thing.
  • So I played nice. Who wants to get into a nasty twitter fight with Lou Rosenfeld of all people. But honestly, I'm not that sure.
  • The reason for this is that there is a new spirit.
  • A new spirit that works through complexity
  • Multiplicity
  • It’s the expression of a postdigital society
  • And works through architectural principles.
  • Let’s start from complexity.
  • An example can explain what complexity is not. Ever tried to build a piece of furniture from IKEA following their instructions?
  • Well, this is not complex. This is complicated.
  • This is complex. A city. Venice, in this case.
  • An emergent, layered system that includes people, artifacts, relationships, and the environment through which they connect and interact.
  • So, again, what is complexity? Tim Gwinn gives us a good example when explaining what complexity means for Robert Rosen. He says complexity works by comparison.
  • Think of vehicles, and suppose you impose a measure past which they are considered oversize.
  • This car is within the limits, so it’s ok. It’s easy to see that a bike would also be ok, and they are approximately comparable. The size wouldn’t differ too much.
  • Now, a truck. This is oversize. Not by much, but it’s definitely part of the second, opposite set we defined by imposing a limit.
  • But what about the Death Star? It’s still oversized, right? So I can say my truck and this planet-size spaceship are part of the same set. Not helpful, right? While the car and bike express a fairly homogeneous set, at least as far as size goes, this set only works in comparison to the first. It’s a complex set, not easily known.
  • Gwinn elaborates a definition from here that he traces back to Rosen. A simple system is simulable.
  • A system that is non-simulable, that is, one that does not allow to predict all final states, is not simple.
  • Hence, it is complex. And unpredictable. Complexity is simply what belies modeling. Behavior in a simple model (and hence in a simple system) can always be correctly predicted: not so in complex systems.
  • This is complex. A system that produces and consumes information, and that is increasingly experienced through the mediation of contextual information.
  • But this is also complex. Linneus’ Tree of Life, a staple of taxonomy and of a way to see information architecture. And it’s the result of a design choice, or multiple design choices. A process. Just like a city. There is nothing necessary here.
  • Now, multiplicity. We need to go back a little for this.
  • When this book came out in 1998, Lou and Peter were working in a world that was strikingly different from the world of today.
  • They could claim that they were working to bring unity via the one unifying medium, the Web, and rightly so.
  • It was largely a synchronic world.
  • You sat at a computer, and did your computing.
  • When you were done, you switched it off and you left all of cyberspace behind.
  • Not today. It doesn’t work that way anymore.
  • As Mitchell says, things are increasingly smeared across multiple sites, devices, identities, and systems, in increasingly complex and undeterminate ways.
  • This is what we are talking about. What do you think? Are there more computers in this picture or more people? I’d bet my money on more computers. Smartphones, laptops, devices, appliances, tablets.
  • This is the average number of hours that EU citizens spend online per week.
  • It’s an average, that hides the 39 hrs/week of the Brits. More time online than hours in the working week, for some.
  • But it’s not being online sitting at a desk in the office, or in the home. Information is pervasive, it has bled into reality. It’s with us when we switch the computer off, because it bounces off a thousand other touchpoints. It’s systemic.
  • Through portable servers the size of your hand.
  • Through real-time displays.
  • Through tablets, smartphones, kiosks. This is a world of multiple Webs, and they are asynchronic.
  • Welcome to the world of postdigital.
  • In 1998, a momentous year it seems, Nicholas Negroponte of MIT wrote an essay for Wired titled “Beyond Digital”.
  • Negroponte believed digital was on its way to banality.
  • At a certain point, digital will be so intertwined with the fabric of day-to-day reality that we will only notice when it’s not there. Just like here, when the conference wi-fi goes down and you can here the “awwww” from miles away.
  • It will be the compost for new ideas.
  • And this is already happening. Think of how the simple use of a relatively simple tool like Google Maps has changed the way we experience a city.
  • An information-based ecosystem connects actors, devices, places.
  • They are everywhere.
  • This is where Mamuro Oshii and his Ghost in the Shell comes in. The movie is a sci-fi / cyberpunk opera questioning what it means to be human.
  • Major Kusanagi, the protagonist, is a police officer and a cyborg. She is trying to capture a terrorist called the Puppet Master who’s probably a runaway government project and who wants to merge his ghost, his conscience, with her shell, her body, into a new being.
  • This man is Gilbert Ryle, a philosopher. He wrote a book in 1949 called The concept of the mind, in which he attacked Decarte’s mind-body dualism. He spoke of ghosts in the machine.
  • There is no such thing as a ghost in the machine. Our mind is one with our body and viceversa. We are embodied beings. Just like Major Kusanagi, we have been ghost-hacked.
  • As embodied beings, we perceive reality through basic primitives that relate to our physical body. Space, time, place. This is where architecture comes in.
  • This is Paris in the 1920s.
  • This is a phone at the time.
  • These are two ladies on a coffee break. Probably a conference.
  • In these years, French-Swiss architect Le Corbusier writes his pamphlet, Towards a New Architecture. In it, Le Corbusier argues that architecture is falling behind.
  • Cars express the spirit of the times.
  • Factories and utility buildings express the spirit of the times. Houses do not. Architects are blind.
  • He will embody his ideas in many villas, machines for living, inspired by engineering, pure volumes. The aesthetics of the new century. These will be the roots of Modernism.
  • As a reaction, Postmodernism will be about relativity, the intellectual pastiche, and citations. Modernism is but the expression of a specific culture among many. There is no supreme truth, there is no sense.
  • Cloud Atlas is a very good example of postmodernist storytelling.
  • But then. Ask yourself: the world we live in, the Facebooks, the Twitters, the Paths. Is this an example of Postmodernism? Well, no.
  • Postmodern is still an old media cultural framing. It’s all about the author. We have stepped into a world of folksonomies and reality tv. It’s a world where users are producers, and the focus has shifted.
  • This is the world of pseudomodern.
  • It’s a world of wranglers, the world Bruce Sterling was talking about in Shaping Things.
  • A world where your disembodied selves are spread across channels, devices, and places.
  • This is not broadcasting anymore. But in some weird way, we are still framing our problems and our solutions that way. We don’t see the complexity, we don’t see the multiplicity, we don’t see we are postdigital. And we don’t do architecture.
  • Information architecture is needed. It’s the way out of the functional box of modernism and the endless, meaningless plays of postmodernism. It’s the way we produce sense. Giving structure, creating the possibility for many different orders.
  • We have to acknowledge this new spirit. When I was a student of architecture, a record store was what we designed when we were asked to give people access to music.
  • This is music today. It’s a flow. It’s information. It’s disembodied. It has no medium. It’s in a link. It’s on Youtube. It’s on Spotify. On my phone.
  • See it. There is a new spirit.
  • If you don’t believe this is all about information, what about this picture? A run-down industrial building, you say? Let me add a bit of information, if you will.
  • Suddenly, everything changes. I didn’t trick you. It’s information. It’s all around us. Design this, and embrace the new spirit.
  • Description

    My presentation at the IAS13, Baltimore.

    Transcript

    1. 1. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE IN THE AGE OF POSTDIGITAL ANDREA @RESMINI GHOST IN THE SHELL
    2. 2. GHOST IN THE SHELL
    3. 3. GHOST IN THE SHELL
    4. 4. GHOST IN THE SHELL
    5. 5. GHOST IN THE SHELL THERE IS A NEW SPIRIT – Le Corbusier,Towards a New Architecture (1926)
    6. 6. GHOST IN THE SHELL COMPLEXITY
    7. 7. GHOST IN THE SHELL MULTIPLICITY COMPLEXITY
    8. 8. GHOST IN THE SHELL POSTDIGITAL MULTIPLICITY COMPLEXITY
    9. 9. GHOST IN THE SHELL POSTDIGITAL MULTIPLICITY COMPLEXITY ARCHITECTURE
    10. 10. GHOST IN THE SHELL COMPLEXITY
    11. 11. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE NPR.ORG
    12. 12. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE NPR.ORG COMPLICATED
    13. 13. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE
    14. 14. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE COMPLEX
    15. 15. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE COMPARISON
    16. 16. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE OVERSIZED
    17. 17. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE
    18. 18. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE
    19. 19. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE
    20. 20. GHOST IN THE SHELL A SYSTEM IS SIMPLE IF ALL ITS MODELS ARE SIMULABLE
    21. 21. GHOST IN THE SHELL A SYSTEM THAT IS NOT SIMPLE IS NON-SIMULABLE
    22. 22. GHOST IN THE SHELL A NON-SIMULABLE SYSTEM IS UNPREDICTABLE AND COMPLEX
    23. 23. GHOST IN THE SHELL City at night, K. Growford
    24. 24. GHOST IN THE SHELL
    25. 25. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE MULTIPLICITY
    26. 26. GHOST IN THE SHELL
    27. 27. GHOST IN THE SHELL THE WEB IS THE UNIFYING FACTOR FOR MANY DIFFERENT COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AND WILDLY DIFFERENT TYPES OF CONTENT – L. Rosenfeld & P. Morville, IA for the WWW
    28. 28. GHOST IN THE SHELL SYNCHRONIC
    29. 29. Andrea Resmini – Ghost in the Shell – 2013 IA Summit Computer room, Santa Barbara – http://is.gd/h4me67
    30. 30. GHOST IN THE SHELL COMPUTING WAS A SPECIFIC ACTIVITY STILL CONFINED TO CLEARLY IDENTIFIED BOUNDED AREAS IN SPACE AND TIME
    31. 31. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE NOT TODAY
    32. 32. GHOST IN THE SHELL ONCE THERE WAS A TIME AND PLACE FOR EVERYTHING: TODAY, THINGS ARE INCREASINGLY SMEARED ACROSS MULTIPLE SITES AND MOMENTS IN COMPLEX AND OFTEN INDETERMINATE WAYS – W. J. Mitchell
    33. 33. GHOST IN THE SHELL Wikimedia – http://is.gd/kOVmXy
    34. 34. GHOST IN THE SHELL 25.9
    35. 35. GHOST IN THE SHELL 39 ComScoreData. – http://www.comscoredatamine.com/2012/08/brits-most-engaged-online-audience-in- europe/
    36. 36. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE– A. Bartholl , Museum of Moving Image
    37. 37. GHOST IN THE SHELL Space Cube
    38. 38. GHOST IN THE SHELL Sheffield, toph3r http://www.flickr.com/photos/ahxcjb/3552828240/
    39. 39. GHOST IN THE SHELL Tablet use 2, ebayink – http://www.flickr.com/photos/ebayink/6816581064/
    40. 40. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE POSTDIGITAL
    41. 41. GHOST IN THE SHELL IS DIGITAL DESTINED FOR BANALITY? CERTAINLY – N. NEGROPONTE, BEYOND DIGITAL (1998)
    42. 42. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE
    43. 43. GHOST IN THE SHELL LIKE AIR AND DRINKING WATER, BEING DIGITAL WILL BE NOTICED ONLY BY ITS ABSENCE, NOT ITS PRESENCE – N. NEGROPONTE, BEYOND DIGITAL (1998)
    44. 44. GHOST IN THE SHELL IT WILL BECOME TOMORROW’S COMMERCIAL AND CULTURAL COMPOST FOR NEW IDEAS – N. NEGROPONTE, BEYOND DIGITAL (1998)
    45. 45. Andrea Resmini – Ghost in the Shell – 2013 IA Summit
    46. 46. GHOST IN THE SHELL THE WEB IS NOT A DESTINATION IN ITSELF BUT A ROUTE MAP TO SOMEWHERE REAL – S. Jenkins,Welcome to the post-digital world
    47. 47. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE ACTOR WEB SIGNS TABLET ACE PHONE KIOSK
    48. 48. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE
    49. 49. GHOST IN THE SHELL GHOST IN THE SHELL – Mamuro Oshii (1995)
    50. 50. GHOST IN THE SHELL
    51. 51. GHOST IN THE SHELL
    52. 52. GHOST IN THE SHELL GHOST IN THE MACHINE – Gilbert Ryle,The Concept of Mind (1949)
    53. 53. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE ARCHITECTURE
    54. 54. Andrea Resmini – Ghost in the Shell – 2013 IA Summit
    55. 55. Andrea Resmini – Ghost in the Shell – 2013 IA Summit
    56. 56. GHOST IN THE SHELL
    57. 57. GHOST IN THE SHELL THERE IS A NEW SPIRIT
    58. 58. GHOST IN THE SHELL Mercedes-Benz
    59. 59. GHOST IN THE SHELL Le Corbusier, grain silo, Canada
    60. 60. GHOST IN THE SHELL MODERN Le Corbusier,Ville Savoye
    61. 61. GHOST IN THE SHELL C. W. Moore, Piazza d'Italia
    62. 62. GHOST IN THE SHELL
    63. 63. GHOST IN THE SHELL
    64. 64. GHOST IN THE SHELL Living Exhibition, photo courtesy of L. Ciolfi
    65. 65. GHOST IN THE SHELL PSEUDOMODERN ARTIFACTS EXIST ONLY AS CONSTANTLY CO-PRODUCED AND REMEDIATED PROCESSES WHOSE CONTENT, MEANINGS AND DYNAMICS ARE SOCIALLY DETERMINED
    66. 66. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE
    67. 67. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE
    68. 68. GHOST IN THE SHELL
    69. 69. GHOST IN THE SHELL A C D B Z R K A C D B Z R W A C D B A C D B Z R K MODERN Z B AC D POSTMODERN POSTDIGITAL Adapted from T. Fenn, 2011
    70. 70. Andrea Resmini – Ghost in the Shell – 2013 IA Summit
    71. 71. Andrea Resmini – Ghost in the Shell – 2013 IA Summit
    72. 72. GHOST IN THE SHELL THERE IS A NEW SPIRIT
    73. 73. GHOST IN THE SHELL THE SPIRIT OF A DIFFERENT ORDER, BRINGING NOT UNITY BUT MULTIPLICITY AND COMPLEXITY
    74. 74. GHOST IN THE SHELL A SPIRIT BRIDGING OUR MANY DISEMBODIED SELF, CONNECTING PEOPLE, PLACES, OBJECTS THROUGH EVER-CHANGING SEMANTICS
    75. 75. GHOST IN THE SHELL A SPIRIT OF CONTEXT, PLACE AND MEANING, TRANSFORMING INFORMATION SPACES INTO DURABLE ARCHITECTURES
    76. 76. GHOST IN THE SHELL THE SPIRIT OF IA A SPIRIT OF SENSE-MAKING, RESHAPING REALITY AND CREATING NEW PLACES “FOR HUMAN BEINGS TO LIVE,WORK,AND PLAY IN”
    77. 77. GHOST IN THE SHELL THAT’S WHY INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE IS THE ARCHITECTURE OF POSTDIGITAL INFORMATION SPACES
    78. 78. GHOST IN THE SHELL
    79. 79. 2013 IA SUMMIT – BALTIMORE
    80. 80. GHOST IN THE SHELL THANKYOU

    Editor's Notes

  • The best way to frame this conversation is through this tweet I sent a few months ago.
  • That prompted a quick reply from someone who has some responsibilities when it comes to making IA a thing.
  • So I played nice. Who wants to get into a nasty twitter fight with Lou Rosenfeld of all people. But honestly, I'm not that sure.
  • The reason for this is that there is a new spirit.
  • A new spirit that works through complexity
  • Multiplicity
  • It’s the expression of a postdigital society
  • And works through architectural principles.
  • Let’s start from complexity.
  • An example can explain what complexity is not. Ever tried to build a piece of furniture from IKEA following their instructions?
  • Well, this is not complex. This is complicated.
  • This is complex. A city. Venice, in this case.
  • An emergent, layered system that includes people, artifacts, relationships, and the environment through which they connect and interact.
  • So, again, what is complexity? Tim Gwinn gives us a good example when explaining what complexity means for Robert Rosen. He says complexity works by comparison.
  • Think of vehicles, and suppose you impose a measure past which they are considered oversize.
  • This car is within the limits, so it’s ok. It’s easy to see that a bike would also be ok, and they are approximately comparable. The size wouldn’t differ too much.
  • Now, a truck. This is oversize. Not by much, but it’s definitely part of the second, opposite set we defined by imposing a limit.
  • But what about the Death Star? It’s still oversized, right? So I can say my truck and this planet-size spaceship are part of the same set. Not helpful, right? While the car and bike express a fairly homogeneous set, at least as far as size goes, this set only works in comparison to the first. It’s a complex set, not easily known.
  • Gwinn elaborates a definition from here that he traces back to Rosen. A simple system is simulable.
  • A system that is non-simulable, that is, one that does not allow to predict all final states, is not simple.
  • Hence, it is complex. And unpredictable. Complexity is simply what belies modeling. Behavior in a simple model (and hence in a simple system) can always be correctly predicted: not so in complex systems.
  • This is complex. A system that produces and consumes information, and that is increasingly experienced through the mediation of contextual information.
  • But this is also complex. Linneus’ Tree of Life, a staple of taxonomy and of a way to see information architecture. And it’s the result of a design choice, or multiple design choices. A process. Just like a city. There is nothing necessary here.
  • Now, multiplicity. We need to go back a little for this.
  • When this book came out in 1998, Lou and Peter were working in a world that was strikingly different from the world of today.
  • They could claim that they were working to bring unity via the one unifying medium, the Web, and rightly so.
  • It was largely a synchronic world.
  • You sat at a computer, and did your computing.
  • When you were done, you switched it off and you left all of cyberspace behind.
  • Not today. It doesn’t work that way anymore.
  • As Mitchell says, things are increasingly smeared across multiple sites, devices, identities, and systems, in increasingly complex and undeterminate ways.
  • This is what we are talking about. What do you think? Are there more computers in this picture or more people? I’d bet my money on more computers. Smartphones, laptops, devices, appliances, tablets.
  • This is the average number of hours that EU citizens spend online per week.
  • It’s an average, that hides the 39 hrs/week of the Brits. More time online than hours in the working week, for some.
  • But it’s not being online sitting at a desk in the office, or in the home. Information is pervasive, it has bled into reality. It’s with us when we switch the computer off, because it bounces off a thousand other touchpoints. It’s systemic.
  • Through portable servers the size of your hand.
  • Through real-time displays.
  • Through tablets, smartphones, kiosks. This is a world of multiple Webs, and they are asynchronic.
  • Welcome to the world of postdigital.
  • In 1998, a momentous year it seems, Nicholas Negroponte of MIT wrote an essay for Wired titled “Beyond Digital”.
  • Negroponte believed digital was on its way to banality.
  • At a certain point, digital will be so intertwined with the fabric of day-to-day reality that we will only notice when it’s not there. Just like here, when the conference wi-fi goes down and you can here the “awwww” from miles away.
  • It will be the compost for new ideas.
  • And this is already happening. Think of how the simple use of a relatively simple tool like Google Maps has changed the way we experience a city.
  • An information-based ecosystem connects actors, devices, places.
  • They are everywhere.
  • This is where Mamuro Oshii and his Ghost in the Shell comes in. The movie is a sci-fi / cyberpunk opera questioning what it means to be human.
  • Major Kusanagi, the protagonist, is a police officer and a cyborg. She is trying to capture a terrorist called the Puppet Master who’s probably a runaway government project and who wants to merge his ghost, his conscience, with her shell, her body, into a new being.
  • This man is Gilbert Ryle, a philosopher. He wrote a book in 1949 called The concept of the mind, in which he attacked Decarte’s mind-body dualism. He spoke of ghosts in the machine.
  • There is no such thing as a ghost in the machine. Our mind is one with our body and viceversa. We are embodied beings. Just like Major Kusanagi, we have been ghost-hacked.
  • As embodied beings, we perceive reality through basic primitives that relate to our physical body. Space, time, place. This is where architecture comes in.
  • This is Paris in the 1920s.
  • This is a phone at the time.
  • These are two ladies on a coffee break. Probably a conference.
  • In these years, French-Swiss architect Le Corbusier writes his pamphlet, Towards a New Architecture. In it, Le Corbusier argues that architecture is falling behind.
  • Cars express the spirit of the times.
  • Factories and utility buildings express the spirit of the times. Houses do not. Architects are blind.
  • He will embody his ideas in many villas, machines for living, inspired by engineering, pure volumes. The aesthetics of the new century. These will be the roots of Modernism.
  • As a reaction, Postmodernism will be about relativity, the intellectual pastiche, and citations. Modernism is but the expression of a specific culture among many. There is no supreme truth, there is no sense.
  • Cloud Atlas is a very good example of postmodernist storytelling.
  • But then. Ask yourself: the world we live in, the Facebooks, the Twitters, the Paths. Is this an example of Postmodernism? Well, no.
  • Postmodern is still an old media cultural framing. It’s all about the author. We have stepped into a world of folksonomies and reality tv. It’s a world where users are producers, and the focus has shifted.
  • This is the world of pseudomodern.
  • It’s a world of wranglers, the world Bruce Sterling was talking about in Shaping Things.
  • A world where your disembodied selves are spread across channels, devices, and places.
  • This is not broadcasting anymore. But in some weird way, we are still framing our problems and our solutions that way. We don’t see the complexity, we don’t see the multiplicity, we don’t see we are postdigital. And we don’t do architecture.
  • Information architecture is needed. It’s the way out of the functional box of modernism and the endless, meaningless plays of postmodernism. It’s the way we produce sense. Giving structure, creating the possibility for many different orders.
  • We have to acknowledge this new spirit. When I was a student of architecture, a record store was what we designed when we were asked to give people access to music.
  • This is music today. It’s a flow. It’s information. It’s disembodied. It has no medium. It’s in a link. It’s on Youtube. It’s on Spotify. On my phone.
  • See it. There is a new spirit.
  • If you don’t believe this is all about information, what about this picture? A run-down industrial building, you say? Let me add a bit of information, if you will.
  • Suddenly, everything changes. I didn’t trick you. It’s information. It’s all around us. Design this, and embrace the new spirit.
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