Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
1
“Five Year Plans of India”
2
PLANNING
DEFINITION :
Planning is the iterative process of making
decisions about the effective tasks to achieve the
obj...
Why to Plan ???
3
After independence, India was in dire conditions
and needed to start acting soon
Some of the problems ne...
4
HEALTH AND FIVE YEAR PLAN
Recognising the health as an
important contributory factor in the
utilisation of manpower and ...
5
OBJECTIVES
The broad objectives of the health programme
during five- year-plans are as follows:
Control and eradication ...
6
PURPOSES
For the purposes of planning ,health sector
has been divided into the following subsectors
Water supply and san...
7
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENTPROGRAMME
The community programme was
launched in India during 1952.
It is the process which is des...
8
First Five Year Plan
(1951-1956)
Introduced by the then PM Pt. J. Nehru
between the period 1951-56
The one responsible -...
9
Objectives:
Improve living standards of the people in India
which was possible by making judicious use of Natural
Resou...
Objectives: (cont…)
10
Importance was given to agriculture and irrigation;
Power to decrease reliance on Food Grain, Impo...
11
ACHIEVMENTS
A few things that happened …………
Mettur, Hirakud & Bhakra Dams were a few projects
that were started
Govt. d...
12
HEALTH AND FIRST PLAN
PRIORITIES
Provision of water supply and sanitation
Control of malaria
Preventive health care of ...
Second Five Year Plan
(1956-1961)
13
Objectives:
To increase the national income by 25%
To make the country more industr...
14
Achievements:
Five steel mills at Bhilai, Durgapur, and Jamshedpur
Hydroelectric power projects
Production of coal i...
15
HEALTH AND SECOND FIVE YEAR PLAN
Establishment of institutional facilities to serve as a basis
from which services coul...
Third Five Year Plan
(1961-1966)
16
Objectives:
More stress to agriculture
Subsidies
Sufficient help
To increase the n...
Achievements:
17
The Panchayat Organization was formed
Many primary schools were started in rural areas
State electrici...
OBJECTIVES:
18
Water supply environmental sanitation [rural &
Urban]
Health care [ hospitals and dispensaries]
Control of ...
Fourth Five Year Plan
(1969 to 1974)
19
At this time Indira Gandhi was the Prime Minister.
The Govt. nationalized 19 major...
20
ANNUAL PLANS [1966-69]
The fourth FYP which was to commence
from April 1966 was postponed till 1969
due to Indo-pak war...
Achievements:
21
Great advancement has been made with regard to India's
national income
Spending on war efforts reduced ...
22
HEALTH AND FOURTH PLAN
During this period the revised estimate of public sector outlay
was 16,774 crores of which Rs 1,...
Fifth Five Year Plan
(1974 to 1979)
23
Objectives:
To reduce social, regional, and economic disparities
Reduce poverty a...
Achievements:
24
Food grain production was above 118 million tons
due to the improvement of infrastructural facilities
Bo...
OBJECTIVES
25
Increasing accessibility of health services to rural areas
Correcting regional imbalance
Further development...
26
ROLLING PLAN (1978–1980)
The Janata Party government rejected
the Fifth Five-Year Plan and introduced
a new Sixth Five-...
Sixth Five Year Plan
(1980 to 1985)
27
6th Five Yr Plan -- Known as Janata Govt. Plan
It’s Existence – Tourism industry in...
Objectives
28
Family Planning concept introduced,
but not forcibly
To introduce min Needs Program for
the poor
Improve ...
29
ACHIEVEMENTS:
Planned GDP growth - 5.1% a year, achieved 5.4%
Speedy Industrial development
The transport and commun...
30
HEALTH AND SIXTH PLAN
Minimum needs programme, which was started during fifth
plan continued with the same objective as...
Seventh Five Year Plan
(1985 to 1989)
31
Congress comes into power
Objectives:
To upgrade the industrial sector
To gener...
Achievements:
Using modern technology
Full supply of food, clothing, and shelter
Making India an Independent Economy
A...
Eighth Five Year Plan
(1992 to 1997)
33
Objectives:
Modernization of Industrial Sector
The plan focused on technical dev...
34
ACHIEVEMENTS:
Production of food increased from 51 million to 176.22
million
GDP shoots up to a whooping 6.3% ………..th...
35
Ninth Five Year Plan
(1997 to 2002)
By Planning Commission
General:
Target 6.5%!!!
Achieved 5.35% 
36
Objectives:
To prioritize rural development
To generate adequate employment
opportunity
To stabilize the prices
To ...
Objectives: (cont…)
37
To provide for basic infrastructural facilitie
Education
Water
Health
Transport
Energy
Achiev...
38
STRATEGIES
•Structural transformations and developments in the
Indian economy.
•New initiatives and initiation of corre...
39
STRATEGIES (Cont..)
•Providing services like electricity,
telecommunication, railways etc.
•Special plans to empower th...
40
PERFORMANCE
•The Ninth Five-Year Plan achieved a GDP
growth rate of 5.4% against a target of 6.5%
•The agriculture indu...
Tenth Five Year Plan
(2002 to 2007)
41
The Tenth Five Plan will cover a period from 1st April 2002 to 31st march 2007.
The...
However, there are several aspects of development where
our progress is clearly disappointing. Some of the weaknesses
are:...
 Objectives of the Tenth Plan:
43
Main objectives of the tenth plan are:
Rate of growth of national income
Growth rate ...
44
Strategy of the Tenth Plan:
1. Acceleration
2. Redefining the Role of Government
3. Agricultural Development
4. Employ...
Eleventh Five Year Plan
(2007-2012)
45
Introduction:
The National Development Council has approved the
11th Five Year Pla...
Infrastructure
• Roads
• Ports
• Airports
• Railways
• Power
• Irrigation
• Telecom/IT
Education
Youth Affairs
Sports ...
Strategy of 11th Plan:
47
The main elements of strategy of 11th Plan are:
1. Rapid Growth
2. Inclusive Growth
3. Main Pri...
48
Main Areas of 11th Plan:
Main areas of 11th plan are as
follows:
1. Agriculture
2. Infrastructure
Highways
Airports
...
49
Assessment of Economic Planning in India:
o Achievements:
1. Increase in National Income
2. Increase in Per Capita Inc...
50
TWELFTH FIVE YEAR PLAN
•The government on 4th October approved the
12th five year plan (2012-17) that set average
growt...
51
OBJECTIVES
Basic objective : Faster, More Inclusive, and
Sustainable Growth.
Could aim at 9.0 to 9.5 percent
For growth...
52
STRATEGIC CHALLENGES
Based on an intensive process within the
Commission, following "Twelve Strategy
Challenges" have b...
53
STRATEGIC CHALLENGES (Cont…)
7. Securing the Energy Future for India
8. Accelerated Development of Transport
Infrastruc...
54
Target at least 4% growth for agriculture.
Cereals are on target for 1.5 to 2% growth.
Land and water are the critical ...
55
• Investment and capacity additions are critical for
sustained industrial growth.
• Need to grow at 11-12% per year to ...
56
• Some sectors should be given special attention because they
contribute most to our objectives
e.g. Create large emplo...
57
Must aim at universalisation of secondary education by
2017
Must aim at raising the Gross Enrolment Ratio (GER) in
High...
58
• Better health is not only about curative care, but about
better prevention, Clean drinking water, sanitation and
bett...
59
• Commercial energy demand will increase at 7%
p.a. if GDP grows at 9%. This will require a
major supply side response ...
60
• We must set a target of 100,000 MW capacity in 12th
Plan (against achievement of 50,000 MW in Eleventh
Plan)
• Coal a...
61
• Nuclear power programme must continue with
necessary safety review.
• Solar Mission is seriously underfunded.
• Need ...
62
• India’s urban population is expected to increase from 400
million in 2011 to about 600 million or more by 2030
• Crit...
63
• Railways’ Western and Eastern Dedicated Freight
Corridors must be completed by the end of the Twelfth
Plan
• High Spe...
64
65
• Health and Education received less than projected in
Eleventh Plan. Allocations for these sectors have
increased in 1...
66
67
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Five year plan new (2)

1,941 views

Published on

IT GIVES INFORMATION UPTO 12 TH FIVE YEAR PLANS

Published in: Healthcare

Five year plan new (2)

  1. 1. 1 “Five Year Plans of India”
  2. 2. 2 PLANNING DEFINITION : Planning is the iterative process of making decisions about the effective tasks to achieve the objectives Planning is a process of determining the objectives of administrative efforts and devising the means calculated to achieve them. • Millet Planning is a process of setting formal guidelines and constraints for the behaviour of the firm. -Assoff and Brudinharg
  3. 3. Why to Plan ??? 3 After independence, India was in dire conditions and needed to start acting soon Some of the problems necessitated need for an immediate plan: Vicious circle of poverty Foreign Trade Need for Rapid industrialization Population pressure Development of Natural resources Capital Deficiency & Market imperfections
  4. 4. 4 HEALTH AND FIVE YEAR PLAN Recognising the health as an important contributory factor in the utilisation of manpower and in the uplifting of the economic condition of the country, the Planning commission gave considerable importance of health programmes in the five year plans.
  5. 5. 5 OBJECTIVES The broad objectives of the health programme during five- year-plans are as follows: Control and eradication of major communicable diseases Strengthening of basic health services through the establishment of primary health centres and sub-centres, Population Development of health manpower resources.
  6. 6. 6 PURPOSES For the purposes of planning ,health sector has been divided into the following subsectors Water supply and sanitation Control of communicable diseases Medical education ,training and research Medical care including hospitals ,dispensaries and PHCs Public Health Services Family planning and Indigenous system of medicine
  7. 7. 7 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENTPROGRAMME The community programme was launched in India during 1952. It is the process which is designed to promote better living of whole community ,with active participation by the community itself along with government efforts.
  8. 8. 8 First Five Year Plan (1951-1956) Introduced by the then PM Pt. J. Nehru between the period 1951-56 The one responsible -- Planning Commission
  9. 9. 9 Objectives: Improve living standards of the people in India which was possible by making judicious use of Natural Resources. Total outlay of this plan -- A massive Rs.`2069 Cr The segregation – Industrial sector Energy, irrigation Transport, Communications and Rehabilitations Social services Development of Agriculture & community
  10. 10. Objectives: (cont…) 10 Importance was given to agriculture and irrigation; Power to decrease reliance on Food Grain, Imports & resolve Food crisis
  11. 11. 11 ACHIEVMENTS A few things that happened ………… Mettur, Hirakud & Bhakra Dams were a few projects that were started Govt. decides to improve Railway Services, Road tracks & Civil Aviation, also decides to provide sufficient funds to the Industrial sector & to take measures for the growth of SSI’s. The growth in GDP achieved by India was 3.6% p.a. The target was ………………….2.1% p.a.
  12. 12. 12 HEALTH AND FIRST PLAN PRIORITIES Provision of water supply and sanitation Control of malaria Preventive health care of the rural population through the health units and mobile units Health services for the mother and children Education and training and health education Self sufficiency in drugs and equipment Family planning and population control
  13. 13. Second Five Year Plan (1956-1961) 13 Objectives: To increase the national income by 25% To make the country more industrialized Development of the public sector To increase employment opportunities so that every citizen gets a job
  14. 14. 14 Achievements: Five steel mills at Bhilai, Durgapur, and Jamshedpur Hydroelectric power projects Production of coal increased More Railway lines were added in the north east Improved the living standards of the people The large enterprises in seventeen industries were nationalized The Tata Institute of Fundamental Research – established in 1957 as a research institute Atomic Energy Commission -- Homi J. Bhabha (Founder, 1958)
  15. 15. 15 HEALTH AND SECOND FIVE YEAR PLAN Establishment of institutional facilities to serve as a basis from which services could be rendered to the people locally and in surrounding territories. Development of technical manpower through appropriate training programmes Intensifying measures to control widely spread communicable diseases Encouraging active campaign for environmental hygiene. Provision of family planning and other supporting services for raising health standard of the people.
  16. 16. Third Five Year Plan (1961-1966) 16 Objectives: More stress to agriculture Subsidies Sufficient help To increase the national income by 5% per annum Making India self sufficient in food grains by increasing agricultural production Minimizing rate of unemployment To establish equality among all the people of the country
  17. 17. Achievements: 17 The Panchayat Organization was formed Many primary schools were started in rural areas State electricity boards and state secondary education boards were formed State road transportation corporations were formed Many cement and fertilizer plants were also built
  18. 18. OBJECTIVES: 18 Water supply environmental sanitation [rural & Urban] Health care [ hospitals and dispensaries] Control of communicable diseases Medical education, research and training Other services- health education, school health, MCH, mental health, health insurance ISM and Family planning. HEALTH AND THIRD FIVE YEAR PLAN
  19. 19. Fourth Five Year Plan (1969 to 1974) 19 At this time Indira Gandhi was the Prime Minister. The Govt. nationalized 19 major Indian banks. Objectives: To reform and restructure its expenditure agenda (Defense became one major expense) To facilitated growth in exports To alter the socio economic structure of the society
  20. 20. 20 ANNUAL PLANS [1966-69] The fourth FYP which was to commence from April 1966 was postponed till 1969 due to Indo-pak war. During this intervening period [1966-69] was covered by Annual plans with an outplay of Rs.6,756 crores in the public sector of which the expenditure on health programmes was Rs.316 crores[4.7%]
  21. 21. Achievements: 21 Great advancement has been made with regard to India's national income Spending on war efforts reduced industrial spending Tested the first nuclear weapon with Smiling Buddha in 1974 Considered as one of the emerging powers Food grains production increased to bring about self sufficiency in production
  22. 22. 22 HEALTH AND FOURTH PLAN During this period the revised estimate of public sector outlay was 16,774 crores of which Rs 1,156 crores [7.2%] were allotted to health sector. OBJECTIVES Certain objectives of the Mudaliar Committee were the base for the fourth FYP in relation to health. These are as follows: To provide an effective base for health services in rural areas by strengthening the primary health centres. Strengthening of sub-divisional and district hospitals to provide effective referral services for primary health centre, and Expansion of the medical and nursing education and training of paramedical personnel to meet the minimum technical manpower requirements.
  23. 23. Fifth Five Year Plan (1974 to 1979) 23 Objectives: To reduce social, regional, and economic disparities Reduce poverty and to attain self sufficiency in agriculture and defense Reducing rate of Unemployment both in Urban & Rural sectors Encourage Self-employment Encourage growth of Small scale industries Prevent over population
  24. 24. Achievements: 24 Food grain production was above 118 million tons due to the improvement of infrastructural facilities Bombay High had shot up the commercial production of oil in India
  25. 25. OBJECTIVES 25 Increasing accessibility of health services to rural areas Correcting regional imbalance Further development of referral services by removing deficiencies, in district and sub-divisional hospitals. Integration of health, family planning and nutrition Intensification of the control and eradication of communicable diseases especially malaria and small pox Quantitative improvement in the education and training of health personnel by converting unipurpose workers to multipurpose workers, Development of referral services by providing specialists attention to common diseases in rural areas. HEALTH AND FIFTH PLAN
  26. 26. 26 ROLLING PLAN (1978–1980) The Janata Party government rejected the Fifth Five-Year Plan and introduced a new Sixth Five-Year Plan (1978- 1983). This plan was again rejected by the Indian National Congress government in 1980 and a new Sixth Plan was made.
  27. 27. Sixth Five Year Plan (1980 to 1985) 27 6th Five Yr Plan -- Known as Janata Govt. Plan It’s Existence – Tourism industry increased, I.T sector develops!!!!! The issues – Rajiv Gandhi being the PM, & hence emphasized on Industrial Development Some agreed, but the communist groups protested
  28. 28. Objectives 28 Family Planning concept introduced, but not forcibly To introduce min Needs Program for the poor Improve the Tourism Industry Aimed for rapid Industrial Development
  29. 29. 29 ACHIEVEMENTS: Planned GDP growth - 5.1% a year, achieved 5.4% Speedy Industrial development The transport and communication system also improved Government investments in the Indian healthcare sector
  30. 30. 30 HEALTH AND SIXTH PLAN Minimum needs programme, which was started during fifth plan continued with the same objective as follows. Elementary education Adult education Rural health Rural water supply Rural road Rural electrification House sites / houses for rural landless labourers, Environmental improvement of slums Nutrition
  31. 31. Seventh Five Year Plan (1985 to 1989) 31 Congress comes into power Objectives: To upgrade the industrial sector To generate more scope of employment Improved facilities for Education to girls Increase productivity of small and large scale farmers
  32. 32. Achievements: Using modern technology Full supply of food, clothing, and shelter Making India an Independent Economy Anti-poverty programs
  33. 33. Eighth Five Year Plan (1992 to 1997) 33 Objectives: Modernization of Industrial Sector The plan focused on technical development Strengthening the infrastructure Involvement of Panchayat raj, Nagarpalika, N.G.O's & people's participation Many flawed plans & Policies were rectified in this plan. During this period India was the only lucky one to become a member of the WTO (1st Jan 1995)
  34. 34. 34 ACHIEVEMENTS: Production of food increased from 51 million to 176.22 million GDP shoots up to a whooping 6.3% ………..the target was 1.6% The plan was more successful than the 7th year plan 24.4% domestic savings, it contributed 10.1% to the GDP in regards to Export Earnings Was a plan that was more successful in meeting its objectives as compared to other plans?
  35. 35. 35 Ninth Five Year Plan (1997 to 2002) By Planning Commission General: Target 6.5%!!! Achieved 5.35% 
  36. 36. 36 Objectives: To prioritize rural development To generate adequate employment opportunity To stabilize the prices To ensure food & nutritional security Encourage Women improvement To create a liberal market for Private investment
  37. 37. Objectives: (cont…) 37 To provide for basic infrastructural facilitie Education Water Health Transport Energy Achievements: Yes!! India managed to bring together the giant power, support & effort of public, private & all level of Govt.
  38. 38. 38 STRATEGIES •Structural transformations and developments in the Indian economy. •New initiatives and initiation of corrective steps to meet the challenges in the economy of the country. •Efficient use of scarce resources to ensure rapid growth. •Combination of public and private support to increase employment. •Enhancing high rates of export to achieve self- reliance.
  39. 39. 39 STRATEGIES (Cont..) •Providing services like electricity, telecommunication, railways etc. •Special plans to empower the socially disadvantaged classes of the country. •Involvement and participation of Panchayati Raj institutions/bodies and Nagar Palikas in the development process.
  40. 40. 40 PERFORMANCE •The Ninth Five-Year Plan achieved a GDP growth rate of 5.4% against a target of 6.5% •The agriculture industry grew at a rate of 2.1% against the target of 4.2% •The industrial growth in the country was 4.5% which was higher than that of the target of 3% •The service industry had a growth rate of 7.8%. An average annual growth rate of 6.7% was reached
  41. 41. Tenth Five Year Plan (2002 to 2007) 41 The Tenth Five Plan will cover a period from 1st April 2002 to 31st march 2007. The Tenth plan provides an opportunity at the start of the new millennium, to build upon the gains of the past but also to address the weakness that have emerged. Some of the gains of the past are: I. The growth rate of the national income has important from average of about 5.7% in the eighties to an average of about 6.5% in the Eighth and Ninth Plan periods making India one of the ten fastest growing developing countries. II. The percentage of the population in poverty has continued to decline. III. Population growth has decelerated below 2% for the first time in four decades. IV. Literacy has increased from 52% in 1991 to 65% in 2001. V. Sectors such as software services and IT enabled services have emerged as new source of strength, creating confidence about India’s potential to be competitive in the world economy.
  42. 42. However, there are several aspects of development where our progress is clearly disappointing. Some of the weaknesses are: I. The decline of unemployment is relatively high at above 7%. II. More than half of the children 1-5 years old in rural areas are under nourished. III. The girl children are suffering even more severe malnutrition. IV. The infant morality rate has stagnated at 72 per 1000 for the last several years. V. As many as 60% of rural households and about 20% of urban household do not have a power connection. VI. Only 60% of urban households have taps within their homes. VII. The Tenth Plan must learn from past experience. It must strengthen what has worked well, but it must also avoid repeating past failures. It is with objective that the tenth Five Year Plan is being drawn up as a Reform Plan instead of merely having a Resource Plan.
  43. 43.  Objectives of the Tenth Plan: 43 Main objectives of the tenth plan are: Rate of growth of national income Growth rate of per capita income Improvement in Quality of life Reduction in poverty Provision of gainful employment Provision of universal education Reduction in gender gaps Reduction in growth of population Increases in Literacy Rate Reduction in Infant Mortality Rate Reduction in Material Mortality Ratio (MMR) Environmental Protection Provision of Drinking Water Growth, Equity and Sustainability Balanced Developed in all States
  44. 44. 44 Strategy of the Tenth Plan: 1. Acceleration 2. Redefining the Role of Government 3. Agricultural Development 4. Employment 5. Social Safety 6. Environment Conservation 7. Competitive
  45. 45. Eleventh Five Year Plan (2007-2012) 45 Introduction: The National Development Council has approved the 11th Five Year Plan for the period from 2007 to 2012. The plan document is entitled “Towards Faster and More Inclusive Growth”.
  46. 46. Infrastructure • Roads • Ports • Airports • Railways • Power • Irrigation • Telecom/IT Education Youth Affairs Sports and Physical Education Health Objectives/Targets of plan: Women and Children Income and Poverty Environment
  47. 47. Strategy of 11th Plan: 47 The main elements of strategy of 11th Plan are: 1. Rapid Growth 2. Inclusive Growth 3. Main Priority Areas 4. Main Focus on Private Sector
  48. 48. 48 Main Areas of 11th Plan: Main areas of 11th plan are as follows: 1. Agriculture 2. Infrastructure Highways Airports Railways Power Generation 3. Rural Infrastructure: Specific Targets of Bharat Nirman Programme for the Period (2005-2009) Irrigation Rural Roads Rural Housing Rural Water Rural Electrification Rural Telephone 4. Industry 5. Employment 6. Education 7. Health 8. Social Sector
  49. 49. 49 Assessment of Economic Planning in India: o Achievements: 1. Increase in National Income 2. Increase in Per Capita Income 3. Increase in the Rate of Capital Formation 4. Development of Agriculture 5. Industrial Development 6. Infrastructure Development 7. Generation of Employment 8. Development of Social Services Life Expectancy Death Rate Education Health 9. Self-Reliance 10. Structural and Institutional Changes o Failures: The major failures of economic planning are as follows: 1. No Substantial Increase in the Standard of Living 2. Increase in Unemployment 3. Inequality in Distribution of Income and Wealth 4. More Ambitious 5. Paradox of Saving and Investment 6. Predominance of Welfare Considerations 7. Less Growth in Productive Sector
  50. 50. 50 TWELFTH FIVE YEAR PLAN •The government on 4th October approved the 12th five year plan (2012-17) that set average growth target at 8.2 percent. •The theme of the Approach Paper is “Faster, Sustainable and more inclusive growth” .
  51. 51. 51 OBJECTIVES Basic objective : Faster, More Inclusive, and Sustainable Growth. Could aim at 9.0 to 9.5 percent For growth to be more inclusive we need: Better performance in agriculture Faster creation of jobs, especially in manufacturing Stronger efforts at health, education and Infrastructure. Special plans for disadvantaged/backward regions
  52. 52. 52 STRATEGIC CHALLENGES Based on an intensive process within the Commission, following "Twelve Strategy Challenges" have been identified 1. Enhancing the Capacity for Growth 2. Enhancing Skills and Faster Generation of Employment 3. Managing the Environment 4. Markets for Efficiency and Inclusion 5. Decentralization, Empowerment and Information 6. Technology and Innovation
  53. 53. 53 STRATEGIC CHALLENGES (Cont…) 7. Securing the Energy Future for India 8. Accelerated Development of Transport Infrastructure 9. Rural Transformation and Sustained Growth of Agriculture 10. Managing Urbanization 11. Improved Access to Quality Education 12. Better Preventive and Curative Health Care
  54. 54. 54 Target at least 4% growth for agriculture. Cereals are on target for 1.5 to 2% growth. Land and water are the critical constraints. Technology must focus on land productivity and water use efficiency. Farmers need better functioning markets for both outputs and inputs. Also, better rural infrastructure, including storage and food processing States must act to modify APMC Act/Rules, modernize land records and enable properly recorded land lease markets. AGRICULTURE
  55. 55. 55 • Investment and capacity additions are critical for sustained industrial growth. • Need to grow at 11-12% per year to create 2 million additional jobs per year. Growth in 11th Plan is in 8%. • Indian industry must develop greater domestic value addition. • Tune-up FDI and trade policies to attract quality investment in critical areas. • Improve business regulatory framework: ‘cost of doing business’, transparency, incentives for R&D, innovation etc. • Better consultation and co-ordination in industrial policy making Industry
  56. 56. 56 • Some sectors should be given special attention because they contribute most to our objectives e.g. Create large employment: textiles and garments, leather and footwear; gems and jewellery; food processing industries • Deepen technological capabilities: • Machine tools; IT hardware and electronics • Provide strategic security: • telecom equipment; aerospace; shipping; defence equipment • Capital equipment for infrastructure growth: • Heavy electrical equipment; Heavy transport and earth- moving equipment • Sectoral plans are being prepared for each of the above with involvement of industry associations and the concerned Ministries Industry
  57. 57. 57 Must aim at universalisation of secondary education by 2017 Must aim at raising the Gross Enrolment Ratio (GER) in Higher Education to 20 percent by 2017 and 25 percent by 2022 Must focus on quality of education. Must invest in faculty development and teachers’ training Must aim at significant reduction in social, gender and regional gaps in education. Targets to be set for this purpose Research and innovation in higher education must be encouraged with cross-linkages between institutions and industry Education and Skill Development
  58. 58. 58 • Better health is not only about curative care, but about better prevention, Clean drinking water, sanitation and better nutrition, childcare, etc. Convergence of schemes across Ministries is needed. • Expenditure on health by Centre and States to increase from 1.3% of GDP to at least 2.0%, and perhaps 2.5% of GDP by end of 12th Plan • Desperate shortage of medical personnel. Need targeted approach to increase seats in medical colleges, nursing colleges and other licensed health professionals • Health insurance cover should be expanded to all disadvantaged groups • Focus on women and children; ICDS needs to be revamped Health
  59. 59. 59 • Commercial energy demand will increase at 7% p.a. if GDP grows at 9%. This will require a major supply side response and also demand management • Energy pricing is a major issue. Petroleum and Coal prices are significantly below world prices and world prices are unlikely to soften. Energy
  60. 60. 60 • We must set a target of 100,000 MW capacity in 12th Plan (against achievement of 50,000 MW in Eleventh Plan) • Coal availability will be a major constraint • Hydro-power development seriously hindered by forest and environment clearance procedures. Himalayan States complain strongly. • Electricity tariffs not being revised to reflect rising costs. Regulators are being held back from allowing justified tariff increases. 1. Power Sector Issues
  61. 61. 61 • Nuclear power programme must continue with necessary safety review. • Solar Mission is seriously underfunded. • Need longer term energy solution for cooking in rural areas. Expand LPG network (with cash subsidy for the deserving, not subsidized prices). Also use off grid solar and bio-mass energy • Wind power development, including off shore wind power, needs to be encouraged 2. Other Energy Sources
  62. 62. 62 • India’s urban population is expected to increase from 400 million in 2011 to about 600 million or more by 2030 • Critical challenges are basic urban services especially for the poor: water, sewerage, sanitation, solid waste management, affordable housing, public transport • Investment required in urban infrastructure is estimated at `60 lakh crore over the next 20 years • We need to develop and propagate innovative ways of municipal financing, through Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) • Land management strategies key for good urban development as well as financing urban infrastructure development URBAN DEVELOPMENT
  63. 63. 63 • Railways’ Western and Eastern Dedicated Freight Corridors must be completed by the end of the Twelfth Plan • High Speed Rail link between Delhi-Mumbai and Delhi-Kolkata in the Twelfth Five Year Plan • Complete the linkages between the ports and the existing road and rail network. Need to deepen existing ports. Increase bulk/container capacity • Ensure sufficient provision for maintenance of the already-built roads • Invest in unified tolling and better safety on highways • Improve bus services/public transport in smaller cities, towns and districts.
  64. 64. 64
  65. 65. 65 • Health and Education received less than projected in Eleventh Plan. Allocations for these sectors have increased in 12th Plan • Health, Education and Skill Development together in the Centre’s Plan have increased by 1.2 percent point of GDP • Infrastructure, including irrigation and watershed management and urban infrastructure, will need additional 0.7 percentage point of GDP over the next 4 years • Use of PPP must be encouraged, including in the social sector, i.e. health and education. Efforts on this front need to be intensified Resource Allocation Priorities in 12th Plan
  66. 66. 66
  67. 67. 67

×