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Prue HolmesDurham University
Language and interpersonalcommunication in the research site The research participants are  negotiating    The language ...
Researching multilingually:A hierarchy of access and engagement The Ph.D  student   novice researcher              Doing r...
The language of the researcher-participant experience Motivation for participating in the research The experience of bei...
Motivation for participation To learn about the process of    researching      “I learned how to ask questions,      how ...
Building a relationship“Initial data might not be very accurate   because we were…self-conscious,   getting the right answ...
Building a relationship…or not!“I have been here almost three   years, so all of my feeling is the   same I think.” (V)And...
Building trust“The more we talk, the more I can…I  know your personality. The most  important thing is the personality,  s...
Positioning and powerAS: It’s just good to have a meeting   time, lecturer, like you.P: I’m a student.AS: No, you are lect...
Minimising power distance to   encourage engagementFrom passivity to creativitySX: At first, when you talked with me   and...
Language of the interview“I’m quite slow thinker, I mean I need time to think of the question. If   interview straight awa...
Language of the research topic:reflexivity“You has given me some information how to communicate   with the other people. I...
Participants’ concerns about datainterpretation Checking transcripts    Member checks Interpreting the data    Researc...
Conclusions: Building a multilingualresearch contextMultilingual researchers must… Understand participants’ language  nee...
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Prue Holmes

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Prue Holmes

  1. 1. Prue HolmesDurham University
  2. 2. Language and interpersonalcommunication in the research site The research participants are negotiating  The language  Their relationship with the researcher (power)  The research topic  The research vis-à-vis their own experience The researcher is negotiating  The language  Her relationship with participants (power, building trust)  Getting data to achieve objectives
  3. 3. Researching multilingually:A hierarchy of access and engagement The Ph.D student novice researcher Doing research Interviews Focus groups Case studies Supervising research Supervising students doing research
  4. 4. The language of the researcher-participant experience Motivation for participating in the research The experience of being a research participant Building a relationship with the R (or not) Building trust Negotiating the language of the interview Positioning and power Interpreting and representing the data
  5. 5. Motivation for participation To learn about the process of researching “I learned how to ask questions, how to make a rapport with the interviewees from you” (YR) To practise English To make friends with a NZer To learn more about NZ To find out what the R wanted to know about the PPs To behave responsibly (in a research environment) “I should be cooperative, whatever difficulty I had, so that is why I never refused you…but I thought, oh maybe waste my time!” (YR)
  6. 6. Building a relationship“Initial data might not be very accurate because we were…self-conscious, getting the right answers for you.” (WK)“I don’t think there are some very ??? effect or difference in ??? our culture, but I think it’s true that I feel much better and better when I communicate with you. Yeah, I mean much more comfortable. When I first talk with you, probably because of my language problem. Probably, we don’t know each other, you know, but today you can understand, get a far insight of my thought. You understand me now, to some extent. It’s getting better and better.” (LJ)
  7. 7. Building a relationship…or not!“I have been here almost three years, so all of my feeling is the same I think.” (V)And later…V: Sometimes it’s very boring. You ask me the same question, and I answer you the same answer as well, similar answer. I told you already.P: A bit different, because you didn’t mention about all those Kiwi friends you mixed with. That must have made a difference to your life.V: Mm, but not too much different.
  8. 8. Building trust“The more we talk, the more I can…I know your personality. The most important thing is the personality, so I know you will not do some harm to me and so I can trust you.” (KZ)“So like slowly your influence, that I don’t need to be afraid of you.” [And later] “I don’t know who are you and what are all the kind of, you know, like, when I first came here…I don’t trust you.” (WK)
  9. 9. Positioning and powerAS: It’s just good to have a meeting time, lecturer, like you.P: I’m a student.AS: No, you are lecturer before, so it’s a good experience I think…P: To get to know a lecturer, a student, more, a NZer, more closely…AS: Yeah, more closely…And as I told you, I do well in this research and you try to look after all the research participants very well I think. Contact very well, and especially the dinner, is unforgettable.=> “The Godmother”
  10. 10. Minimising power distance to encourage engagementFrom passivity to creativitySX: At first, when you talked with me and I think, oh, you are a lecturer or you, I mean, you’ve got a high position and I yeah, I should I mean to follow you at every aspect. But gradually, gradually, I mean, yeah, this, I mean, something has been changed and now I mean, I know that’s what I say at first I think I’m just a passive passive role, and finally I know actually both of us are…P: Creating…SX: …are creating, yeah, so it’s different.
  11. 11. Language of the interview“I’m quite slow thinker, I mean I need time to think of the question. If interview straight away the question, I sometimes, when I the answer that I give have to justify or change later when I think more about it. Or I might have something to add. Because maybe its just I prepare.” (AS)“I don’t like to have interview because I feel uncomfortable, you know, because I have to speak English…Sometime we have interview, I have, I don’t understand. I think that difficult question also good for me, to think about it.” (M)“Sometimes the language, I haven’t been thought about that, and sometimes, for example, the value, the community, I haven’t used that. For Chinese that’s a strange word…I learn the words in “Intercultural Communication.” I also feel the word is quite strange. “ (FX)“This question is quite abstract now!” (YR sighs with exasperation!)
  12. 12. Language of the research topic:reflexivity“You has given me some information how to communicate with the other people. It’s what I did not think before you we made this programme. And after you talk with me about this question of course it forced me to thought about that, to think about that.” (SX)“Some questions I never thought about it, and when you ask me and I will start thinking about, yeah, it’s a kind of self value…I quite enjoying this sort of self-evaluation.” (KZ)“ Through this interview I can clear my mind and I’m thinking, “why I’m different from the other people, and why I come here, and I can explain to you and I can also explain to myself as well.” (LJ)
  13. 13. Participants’ concerns about datainterpretation Checking transcripts  Member checks Interpreting the data  Researcher’s cultural misinterpretation  Interest in the outcomes of the research Writing up the study  Sanitising the language and “story” for the supervisor
  14. 14. Conclusions: Building a multilingualresearch contextMultilingual researchers must… Understand participants’ language needs Recognise their responsibility towards the participant (as a cultural informant) Problematise language when abstract concepts like culture, values, social experience are foregrounded Consider providing questions in advance Seek to minimise power distance Build trust Acknowledge and accommodate bilateral reflexivity

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