How to give Successful Interviews - A Guide for Spokespersons

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Media training manual written and edited by me when I worked for Oxfam GB.

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How to give Successful Interviews - A Guide for Spokespersons

  1. 1. a guide to spokespersons RADIO.TELEVISION INTERVIEWS.BRAND.PRINTED PRES POKESPERSON.QUESTIO HOW TO GIVE SUCCESSFUL INTERVIEWS A GUIDE FOR SPOKESPERSONS
  2. 2. 04 INTRODUCTION 06 12 20 32 34 38 Characteristics of a spokesperson > pag 09 Who should be the spokesperson? > pag 10 THE SPOKESPERSON First steps for an interview > pag 13 Developing key messages for your interview > pag 14 Some questions that help you prepare for an interview > pag 16 PREPARING FOR AN INTERVIEW Interviews for television > pag 25 Interviews for the radio > pag 30 Interviews for the printed press > pag 31 HOW TO PROCEED DURING INTERVIEWS AFTER THE INTERVIEW: check list INTERVIEWS AT TIMES OF BRAND RISK SOURCERS OF INFORMATION AND ONLINE RESOURCES
  3. 3. Other advance preparations > pag 18 CONTENT
  4. 4. INTRODUCTION Supplying reliable information, upto-date data, good reports and news will help build a lasting relationship with the media, which may eventually turn out to be mutually beneficial. T  he media are central to influencing public opinion and educating different sectors of the public. They give us a chance to address large audiences and to explain specific positions on important issues. They can also be useful tools for helping raise funds, motivating our supporters, or even for persuading decision-makers, who can produce social change. how to give successful interviews However, it is important to stress that when we talk about the media, we should also include the people who work for the media – journalists, editors, photographers, and camera-men as part of the public our organisation wishes to address. 04 Supplying reliable information, up-to-date data, good reports and news will help build a lasting relationship with the media, which may eventually turn out to be mutually beneficial.
  5. 5. One aspect of this professional relationship is the ability of the organisations´ spokespersons to give information and interviews to the media that will be useful and at the same time help to transmit the messages of the institutions they represent. A professional relationship with the media will help maintain the good reputation of our organisation, and will motivate journalists to continue working with us, which will increase our chances of getting our message across. This is especially important to those organisations that seek to promote changes in ideas and beliefs in order to foster the sustainable and equitable development of society. This handbook, based on the experience of Oxfam and other organisations, gives some practical suggestions to help spokespersons understand a little more about media dynamics, and thus be able to give efficient interviews. a guide to spokespersons One aspect of this professional relationship is the ability of the organisations´ spokespersons to give information and interviews to the media that will be useful and at the same time help to transmit the messages of the institutions they represent. 05
  6. 6. THE SPOKESPERSON how to give successful interviews 06
  7. 7. T  here is no doubt that being a spokesperson is no easy task. Many people simply don’t feel comfortable speaking with the media; and they fear that, since they are the “image” of the organisation they work for, some personal error on their part may affect the credibility of the institution. This risk is, indeed, part of the day’s work, but it can – and must – be minimized with training and the right strategy. Traditionally, the spokesperson is a person who has sound knowledge of the subject he/ she is going to speak on and has the authority to do so. a guide to spokespersons Traditionally, the spokesperson is a person who has sound knowledge of the subject he/she is going to speak on and has the authority to do so. This authority may be inherent to his/her position in the structure of the organisation or it may have been delegated to him or her through formal institutional channels. 07
  8. 8. THE SPOKESPERSON The spokesperson should receive training from those responsible for communications in the organisationand seek support every time he/she receives a request for an interview. Normally, a small group of people have formal authority to speak with the media on behalf of the institution. This rule is essential for guaranteeing that the messages and points of view of the institution have unity and coherence when expressed to the media, and reflect the institution’s position, rather than the personal viewpoint of the person being interviewed. The spokesperson should receive training from those responsible for communications in the organisationand seek support every time he/she receives a request for an interview. how to give successful interviews Once the public line of the message to be transmitted through the interview has been defined, it is up to the spokesperson to keep strictly to it and not to speculate or include his/her own point of view when speaking. 08
  9. 9. Characteristics of a spokesperson Generally speaking, the spokesperson: 1. Has the internal recognition of the institution he/she represents as the person authorised to speak on its behalf. 2. Has sufficient technical and political knowledge of the subject and of the institution. 3. Gets his/her messages across in a convincing way. 4. Is mentally agile and able to adapt rapidly to unexpected situations. 5. Is able to handle the institution’s key messages; and has also good diction and correct use of language. 6. Is able to adapt his/her language to the different audiences for whom the message is intended. 7. Has self-control in adverse situations. 8. Masters his/her body language. 9. Creates empathy in the audience. a guide to spokespersons Of course, spokespersons won’t always have all the characteristics described above. Some, like 1 and 2, are indispensable. Others, like 3 and 4, are practically innate, although they can be improved. However, with training and practice, they can all be developed or improved. 09
  10. 10. THE SPOKESPERSON It is very important that the people at the“front end”of an organisation, that is, those who have direct contact with the public are informed and familiar with the spokespersons´ contact channels... Who should be the spokesperson? Most of the times this responsibility will fall to the executive director, for example, since he/she is the person who legally represents the organisation. how to give successful interviews But sometimes this person does not have the technical ability, or the credibility, or availability to be the spokesperson. In that case, the organisation has to find institutional channels to ensure that another person of lower rank takes on this responsibility: for example an area coordinator or project coordinator who is familiar with the technical data and speaks specifically about his/her area of performance. 10 Generally speaking, all the key staff in an organisation should know who the official spokespersons are. It is very important that the people at the “front line” of an organisation, that is, those who have direct contact with the public – receptionists, concierges, etc. – are informed and familiar with the spokespersons´ contact channels (emergency telephones, e-mail addresses, etc).
  11. 11. Availability In theory, the spokesperson should be prepared to respond 24 hours a day: you never know when an emergency might occur that calls for an official statement by the institution’s spokesperson. This means that the spokesperson should have the capacity and availability to give interviews or speak publicly whenever necessary. The spokesperson should have emergency communication channels (mobile phone, home phone, etc.) listed in the organisation. ...the spokesperson should be prepared to respond 24 hours a day. a guide to spokespersons If the official spokesperson is not available (he/she may be on holiday or sick leave, for instance), a substitute should replace him/ her immediately. The substitution should be communicated to all key areas of the organisation. 11
  12. 12. how to give successful interviews 12 PREPARING FOR AN INTERVIEW
  13. 13. I  deally, no spokesperson should give an interview to the media without being properly prepared. The worst scenario would be improvising your answers because you were not sufficiently prepared. This could potentially damage not only your personal credibility, but also that of the organisation. First steps for an interview 1. Identify the specific goals of the organisation that you wish to promote with the interview. 2. Identify and analyse the audience you want to reach through the interview. 3. Identify in advance the subjects that the journalist wants to address in the interview and those that may come up in the course of the interview. You can find this out by asking the journalist directly about the topics that will be covered with the interview and identifying which aspects of the organisation have caught the journalist’s interest. 4. Identify one, two, or at the most three key messages you wish to emphasize in the interview. 6. Determine how to include the institutional messages that you wish to reinforce with your answers. This important tool will make you better prepared for the actual interview. a guide to spokespersons 5. Prepare a 1-2 page of questions and answers, including the “toughest” questions that the journalist might ask. 13
  14. 14. PREPARING FOR AN INTERVIEW Developing key messages for your interview To give a good interview, you need to define in advance the messages you want to transmit and/or reinforce. By defining these key ideas you will be able to keep yourself within the limits you determine, and will avoid speaking more (or less) than necessary. Remember: All the messages should support and reinforce the main goals of the organisation. - 14 Don’t have more than three messages to reinforce in the interview. A greater number creates confusion and disperses attention from the main topic. - how to give successful interviews - The messages should be simple to communicate. They are ideas that can be explained in a sentence or two. If they require a paragraph or more to be understood, keep working at them.
  15. 15. Don’t have more than three messages to reinforce in the interview. A greater number creates confusion and disperses attention from the main topic. The messages can be reinforced with brief statements, eloquent sentences, statistics, and anecdotes. - For the messages to have an impact, they should be repeated over and over and be constant over time. - The messages can be adapted for specific audiences, but should always remain essentially the same. - All your communication efforts – not only those directed to the media – should reinforce the messages defined in advance. a guide to spokespersons - 15
  16. 16. PREPARING FOR AN INTERVIEW Some questions that can help you to prepare for an interview There are several questions that you will want to know the answer to before accepting an interview: What is the role of your organisation in the proposed space? - Will you be the main guest or a secondary participant? - Who else will they be interviewing? - Which form of the media is interviewing you? Is it a form of mediawhich reaches one of your target audiencess? - What is the format? Newspaper? Television? Internet? Radio? Mainstream? Alternative? - 16 What is the interview about? - how to give successful interviews - If it is one that you are not familiar with, ask about its format: is it a weekly publication, a daily newspaper, the talkshow of a conservative radio station?
  17. 17. If the interview is not on the right subject or will not serve you as a forum to discuss what you want to discuss, consider rejecting it. - What about the format of the interview? Is it one-on-one? Are you part of a panel? Is it broadcast live? Or pre-recorded to be shown afterwards? Is it by phone? - How long will the interview be? - If it is for the written press or internet, do they need a photo? If the interview is not on the right subject or will not serve you as a forum to discuss what you want to discuss, consider rejecting it. a guide to spokespersons If you feel comfortable with the answers to the questions and you feel that the interview will give you a good opportunity to transmit your organisation’s messages, accept. 17
  18. 18. PREPARING FOR AN INTERVIEW ...a successful interview involves not only knowing your subject well, but also having knowledge and control of your emotions. Other advance preparations There is no doubt that the literal meaning of the words you use in an interview has an impact on the journalist and on the other audiences you are trying to reach. how to give successful interviews Nevertheless, equally important – if not more so – is the meaning transmitted by non-verbal communication. 18 This means that a successful interview involves not only knowing your subject well, but also having knowledge and control of your emotions.
  19. 19. Some suggestions for keeping control of the situation: - Know to whom you are talking to when you are being interviewed. - Remember that you are not only talking to the reporter who is interviewing you, but also to the public who reads the story, watches it on television, or hear it on the radio. - Never fire without taking aim. If a reporter calls your office and asks for a “quick comment”don’t accept the , call immediately. - Ask what it is about. Say that you are about to finish a meeting and that you will return the call. Take a deep breath, write some quick notes about the points you want to get across, and then return the call. - See that the office staff are trained to respond to calls from the media. Therefore, make sure that the staff answering the telephone are familiar with the following rules: 1) Nobody, except the designated staff (spokespersons), may give information to the media. Nobody, except the designated staff (spokespersons), may give information to the media. a guide to spokespersons 2) If the spokesperson is not available to take the call from the media, the person who answers should take down the contact information: name of the journalist, organisation he belongs to, direct telephone number, and deadline for a reply. 19
  20. 20. HOW TO PROCEED DURING INTERVIEWS how to give successful interviews 20
  21. 21. - - Keep eye contact with the reporter as you answer his/her questions. This increases your credibility at the same time as it enables you to follow the reporter’s reactions. Always remember that the interview starts the moment you say your first word, so make sure everything you say – from the “hello” to the “goodbye” – serves to strengthen your message. Keep eye contact with the reporter as you answer his/her questions. This increases your credibility at the same time as it enables you to follow the reporter’s reactions. - When you reply to a question, first answer the journalist’s question. Don’t try to get out of answering questions by trying to change the subject, as that will make you seem evasive and unreliable. - Make sure you correct mistaken ideas. Even though you may have sent material in advance, don’t expect that the journalist will have read it all or even that he/she knows what your organisation is about or which topic you want to promote or clarify. Reinforce your messages. Use anecdotes, statistics, and brief, powerful phrases. Have at hand a page with this basic information, the so-called “killer facts”: data and phrases, which, because of their power, might even become the main anchor of the news you want to disclose. - You shouldn’t rely on your memory alone. If you have to deal with numbers, statistical data, etc., it is best to have them at hand. An indispensable item will therefore be your “talking points” list: this is a kind of aide-mémoire with the top line messaging points you want to emphasize backed by some basic data concerning your organisation. a guide to spokespersons - 21
  22. 22. HOW TO PROCEED DURING INTERVIEWS Avoid jargon. Speak in an easily understandable way; avoid very technical language. Avoid jargon. Speak in an easily understandable way; avoid very technical language. - Stay relaxed, and continue to be respectful and diplomatic even if there is extreme provocation on the part of the reporter. - 22 Try to give answers lasting 20-30 seconds at the most to fit into the average time in TV and radio. Likewise, journalists from the written press will be looking for concise quotes to explain your story. - how to give successful interviews - Don’t talk too much: once you have given the answer you want to, simply stop speaking. This is where the biggest mistakes are made: people insist on continuing to talk impulsively even after they have answered the question. - Follow your own agenda and answer each question with a direct, effective statement, followed by a relevant message.
  23. 23. - Never say “no comment!” It will make you sound arrogant, unreliable, and guilty. If you can’t comment on a specific subject, be objective and honest, and explain the reasons - Know the points of view of your opponents. It is not often that the media report only one side of a story. Assume that they will also call the other side, so make sure you dismantle their points with your main proposals. Avoid giving “off-therecord”statements, and, above all, don’t say anything confidential that you wouldn’t like to see on the evening news. Avoid giving “off-the-record” statements, and, above all, don’t say anything confidential that you wouldn’t like to see on the evening news. - Don’t make guesses in an answer. If you don’t know the answer, admit as much and, if possible, take advantage of the situation to stress a relevant point of your message. - Don’t jump about in an interview just because the interviewer does so. If they interrupt you or fire quick questions at you, keep calm, finish your sentences; wait until the interviewer stops to breathe between questions and choose a question to answer. a guide to spokespersons - 23
  24. 24. HOW TO PROCEED DURING INTERVIEWS - If possible, record yourself during interviews given to the press. In this way, if you have any problem, you will have a record for a possible correction. how to give successful interviews - 24 Don’t make judgements about third parties’ quotes, thus avoiding generating unnecessary controversy. - If the question is very ambiguous and you are not sure what the appropriate answer would be, ask the reporter politely to clarify the question and answer it objectively so as not to give the impression that you want to evade it. If possible, record yourself during interviews given to the press. In this way, if you have any problem, you will have a record for a possible correction. The recording also serves to review the interview and improve your future performance. Make sure that the journalist knows you are recording the conversation.
  25. 25. If the interview is somewhere other than your place of work, try to arrive at least 30 minutes before the agreed time. Interviews for television > Before the interview: Try to find out about the context of the interview: who the interviewer is, his or her political point of view and that of the television channel, whether there will be other interviewees, who they are, whether the interview will be live or recorded, what time it will be aired. All this information is important for you to arrive prepared. 2. If the interview is somewhere other than your place of work, try to arrive at least 30 minutes before the agreed time. This will help you to ”get the feel“ of the place where the interview will be, review the topics calmly and go over the messages that you want to emphasize. If you arrive in good time, you will be more at ease. a guide to spokespersons 1. 25
  26. 26. HOW TO PROCEED DURING INTERVIEWS 3. Don’t refuse if they ask you to have make-up on for the interview. This is normal for television and will help your skin look better in front of the cameras, especially because of the heat produced by the lights. 4. If the interview is outdoors, coordinate with the producer or the cameraman to find the best place; try to be in a comfortable place, especially if you are standing. ... so avoid speaking of other subjects unrelated with the interview. 5. If it is a sunny day, find a place where the sun doesn’t bother you. Avoid using sunglasses. how to give successful interviews 6. Once in the presence of the journalist, either in a studio or in an open place, bear in mind that the camera may already be on and filming your reactions and words, so avoid speaking of other subjects unrelated with the interview. Refrain from making indiscreet comments, especially political, religious, or gender-related, etc. Refrain from making jokes or laughing at jokes. 26 7. Keep a professional posture and turn off your mobile phone or put it on vibration mode; if it is necessary to answer a call, move away from the camera and the journalist. Everything you say, and everything your reactions communicate can be filmed and eventually used against you.
  27. 27. Remove any jewellery or accessory that has a shiny surface, reflects, produces noise, shimmers or looks ostentatious. > During the interview: 1. Remember that the television camera captures the smallest detail. So what people perceive about your organisation and your message will depend not only on what you say, but also – and often essentially – on how you say it, how you look, and how you act. 2. Be appropriately dressed for the interview, with neutral colours. The clothes one wears are normally associated with the type of work and the function he/she holds. So very formal clothing in a field situation, humanitarian response, for example, will seem illogical. 3. Remove any jewellery or accessory that has a shiny surface, reflects, produces noise, shimmers or looks ostentatious. 4. Never use very “loud” or checked jackets, shirts or blouses: they create an unfavourable effect on the screen. 6. Try to be aware of your tics and keep them under control; some of them could give a bad impression. For example, avoid wetting your lips or biting them, narrowing or rolling your eyes, or blinking too much. All these movements give you an annoyed look. a guide to spokespersons 5. Maintain eye contact with the interviewer. Try not to look directly at the camera, unless you have been expressly asked to do so by the journalist or the producer. 27
  28. 28. HOW TO PROCEED DURING INTERVIEWS 7. Try to speak at a normal volume. And be sure to vary the tone and rhythm of your speech as you would in a normal conversation. 8. Don’t speak until you have something to say; refrain from filling in silences with unnecessary noises or sudden hand movements. 9. Try not to move too much, and keep to a minimum any gesticulations with your hands or movement of your legs. how to give successful interviews Try to speak at a normal volume. And be sure to vary the tone and rhythm of your speech as you would in a normal conversation. 28 10. If you are sitting at an interview table, a suitable posture is leaning slightly forward with your forearms on the table and your hands clasped. You can gesticulate when necessary, but with moderation. 11. If you are on a sofa or chair, keep your legs crossed at the knees, lean slightly forward, clasp your hands and let your arms rest on your legs. If you are wearing a skirt, you will have to be very careful with your posture. 12. If you are standing, try to keep an average distance of 20 centimetres between your feet, put one leg slightly in front of the other, and let both your arms fall naturally at your sides.
  29. 29. Go over the interview with a critical eye to detect mistakes and good points. 13. Allow your head to move naturally to the rhythm of your speech. As a result, you will automatically – without any conscious effort or affectation – make movements like nodding or shaking your head, raising your eyebrows or frowning to accentuate a point, and this will make your presentation livelier. 14. Try to avoid the use of filler words or “crutches” – expressions like “er . . .um . . . ” , “you know” “I mean . . .” , etc. , > After the interview: 2. Send a note to the reporter and the producer thanking them for the opportunity, and placing yourself at their disposal for future interviews and to provide additional information. a guide to spokespersons 1. Go over the interview with a critical eye to detect mistakes and good points. 29
  30. 30. HOW TO PROCEED DURING INTERVIEWS Interviews for the radio 1. As in the case of television interviews, take it for granted that the tape is recording all the time. Just concentrate on what you have to say and try to avoid comments, digressions, or jokes while you are near the microphone. 2. Speak with a normal volume of voice, allowing yourself to vary your tone and rhythm naturally to place emphasis on key points. 3. When you give an interview in a studio, keep at a constant distance from the microphone and don’t let your body sway from one side to another; don’t move your head backwards and forwards. how to give successful interviews 4. If you take part in a programme where there are other interviewees and there is a debate, try to concentrate on your messages. If provoked take control of your temper. 30 5. If you become aware of a radio report with a biased point of view or which presents inaccurate data, try to contact the radio station at once. It is often possible to correct or give your position on the subject almost immediately. 6. As with the television interviews, don’t forget to send a note to the reporter and the producer thanking them for the opportunity, and placing yourself at their disposal for future interviews and to give additional information.
  31. 31. Have to hand key information about the topic of the interview (statistical data,“killer facts” , explanation of technical data, etc.). Interviews for the printed press 1. If possible, find a place where you can have a quiet, uninterrupted conversation. 2. Try to record the interview, so that you can review the answers afterwards. This serves both for self-assessment and to check any possible misuse of your replies. 3. Have to hand key information about the topic of the interview (statistical data,“killer facts” , explanation of technical data, etc.). 5. Check whether the reporter understands your ideas properly, especially when technical themes are involved. Take the time to clear up any misunderstanding. 6. Offer to supply additional information and make sure you exchange contact information with the journalist. a guide to spokespersons 4. If possible, supply high-resolution photographs that can be used by the media. 31
  32. 32. AFTER THE INTERVIEW-CHECK LIST how to give successful interviews 32
  33. 33. Ask yourself what your strengths and weaknesses were and whether you managed to communicate clearly the message you had in mind. O  nce the interview is over, it is important to take the time for a self-evaluation. Ask yourself what your strengths and weaknesses were and whether you managed to communicate clearly the message you had in mind. Did you... Manage to get your messages across? - Keep your emotions under control? - Keep control of the interview? - Control your language, avoiding negative language use of slang, etc.? - Speak concisely and objectively? - Use anecdotes, personal stories, or relevant facts (killer facts) to reinforce your message? - Refrain from giving personal opinions? - Maintain eye contact with the reporter and smile appropriately? - Show enthusiasm and commitment with the subject of the interview? - Use effective, natural, appropriate body language? a guide to spokespersons - 33
  34. 34. INTERVIEWS AT TIMES OF BRAND RISK how to give successful interviews 34
  35. 35. I  deally, all organisations should be prepared for a situation of brand risk. This preparation has to be done in a period of “calm” The worst thing that . can happen is to try to give improvised solutions to a situation of brand risk. A preparation process implies at least having an internal agreement on the way the organisation will respond to brand risk situations. This agreement is usually recorded in an internal policy, which has already been approved by the management staff. As a minimum, the protocol should include decisions about: ...it is important to have a previous mapping of the organisation’s internal and external contexts and identify what could generate negative publicity. Defining the risk – it is important to define what actually constitutes a brand risk, depending, for example, on the levels of seriousness, and what the response will be for each level. - Anticipating possible crisis scenarios – it is important to have a previous mapping of the organisation’s internal and external contexts and identify what could generate negative publicity. - Forming a “crisis committee” responsible for the management of the brand risk, placing emphasis on setting up internal communication channels. - Formal designation of spokespersons. a guide to spokespersons - 35
  36. 36. INTERVIEWS AT TIMES OF BRAND RISK Generally speaking, if journalists are calling to cover or clarify negative news about your organisation, try to diffuse tension immediately by: Assuring your interviewer that the information you can share will be available as soon as possible. - Giving a reasonable justification to explain why you can’t give a certain type of information (still under investigation; I don’t have all the facts right now, etc.). - If you are still under pressure, explaining calmly why you can’t give more details. - Avoiding basing yourself on speculations. Only talk about concrete facts. - Keep calm. - 36 Being clear what you want to say and, at the same time, what you do not want to say to your interviewer. Being available and supplying some details helps to reduce the appearance of being in a fix. - how to give successful interviews - Look for a way to turn the bad news into good coverage of your organisation. Giving a reasonable justification to explain why you can’t give a certain type of information...
  37. 37. Focus on clearing up the negative points, mitigate any damage, and open up the possibility for more communication. On the other hand, if negative stories are circulating about your organisation and the journalists are NOT calling for a clarification, you should take the following steps: Decide whether it is necessary to modify the perception that the news item is creating. - If so, act fast. Have a press release or some kind of response ready as quickly as possible, preferably the same day the negative item has appeared. - Focus on clearing up the negative points, mitigate any damage, and open up the possibility for more communication. - Take advantage of the opportunity to raise the level of knowledge about your organisation —make sure the public material you distribute for the media or the public at large has basic information about your institution. - Try to contact the medium that put out the negative news directly to offer your version. a guide to spokespersons - 37
  38. 38. SOURCES OF INFORMATION AND ONLINE RESOURCES how to give successful interviews
  39. 39. > Guidelines for Broadcasting Interviews: Documento interno de Oxfam GB. > Mi espacio (Spanish): http://www.miespacio.org/ > RRPPnet (Public Relations Portal – Spanish): http://www.rrppnet.com.ar > The Communication Initiative Network: http://www.comminit.com > Ed Shiller Communications – PR Notes: http://www.edshiller.com/notesindex.asp > Green Media Toolshed: http://www.greenmediatoolshed.org/. > Bernstein Crisis Management (BCM) website: a guide to spokespersons http://www.bernsteincrisismanagement.com/articles.html. 39
  40. 40. RADIO.TELEVISION INTERVIEWS.BRAND.PRINTED PRES POKESPERSON.QUESTIO how to give successful interviews JUNE/2008 Oxfam GB is an independent, non-governmental organisation that works with others in more than 80 countries to overcome poverty and suffering. Oxfam GB is a member of Oxfam International. HOW TO GIVE SUCCESSFUL INTERVIEWS: A GUIDE FOR SPOKESPERSONS © Oxfam GB 2008 Prepared and Organised by: Renato Guimarães Revised and edited by: LZC Imágen y Comunicación S.A.C / Graphic Project: LZC Imágen y Comunicación S.A.C Oxfam GB: comunicaciones@oxfam.org.uk www.oxfam.org.uk Oxfamm GB is a member of Oxfam International – Registered Charity No. 202918

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