Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

The Competing Narratives of Digital & Media Literacy

198 views

Published on

Renee Hobbs explores the history of media literacy in an address to the Media Ecology Association upon receiving the Neil Postman Lifetime Achievement Award for Public Intellectual Activity.

Published in: Education

The Competing Narratives of Digital & Media Literacy

  1. 1. Renee Hobbs Professor of Communication Studies Director, Media Education Lab University of Rhode Island USA Twitter: @reneehobbs The Competing Narratives of Digital and Media Literacy Media Ecology Association University of Maine June 23, 2018 #mediaecology2018
  2. 2. PEER-TO-PEER FILE SHARING My Argument Media literacy education evolves in response to changes in media, technology, education, and the cultural environment Competing narratives of media literacy education reflect & embody multidisciplinary traditions of scholars, practitioners and policymakers Historical research helps us understand how media literacy practice reflects a complex and individualized network of relationships between people and ideas over time Educators and scholars should retrieve some older concepts as they reinvent the theory and practice of media literacy in relation to the needs of learners in contemporary society
  3. 3. How is media literacy defined?
  4. 4. Stakeholders in Digital and Media Literacy MEDIAACTIVIST GOVERNMENTLIBRARY EDUCATIONRELIGION
  5. 5. Media literacy is responsive to people’s lived experience with digital media, mass media & popular culture RELEVANCE
  6. 6. Representation Media Effects Interpretation Semiotics Political Economy KeyKey Concepts and Core Principles of Media Literacy, NAMLE
  7. 7. MEDIA LITERACY IS…. • a critique of media’s institutional and social power • a type of education designed to protect people from potential harms of media exposure • a dimension of democratic citizenship • a social movement empowering people to “talk back” to media • a type of education that advances the capacity for lifelong learning • an expanded form of literacy
  8. 8. A definition is the start of an argument, not the end of one. -Neil Postman, 1976
  9. 9. Digital Literacy SKILLS & ABILITIES ➢ Computer Use ➢ Digital Skills ➢ Participatory Culture LITERACY ➢ Multimodality & New Literacies ➢ Media Production & Composition ➢ Coding & Programming TEACHING WITH ➢ Technology Integration ➢ Digital Media and Learning ➢ Connected Learning TEACHING ABOUT ➢ Information Literacy ➢ Media Literacy ➢ Internet Safety & Digital Citizenship an expanding array of concepts, terms and approaches
  10. 10. How has media literacy changed over time?
  11. 11. Rhetoric Print Literacy Visual Literacy Information Literacy Media Literacy Computer Literacy News Literacy Digital Literacy From Orality to Literacy and Beyond
  12. 12. 1930s. How to Recognize and Resist Propaganda 1950s. The Rise of Film Studies 1960s. Critical Analysis of Advertising 1970s. Focus on Media Effects 1980s. Cultural Context, Political Economy, and Processes of Interpretation 1990s. The Rise of Youth Media 2000s. Participatory Culture 2010s. Fake News, Privacy, Platform Capitalism Mapping Media Literacy History COMMUNICATION
  13. 13. 1930s. Discriminating between Classic and Contemporary Literature 1950s. The Rise of Educational Television 1960s. Popular Culture Enters the Classroom 1970s. School Journalism & Video Production 1980s. Film as Literature 1990s. New Literacies 2000s. Ed Tech Industry 2010s. Digital Citizenship & Credibility Mapping Media Literacy History EDUCATION
  14. 14. Communication/Media Studies Education/Literacy Competing Narratives of the Past
  15. 15. Literacy as metaphor
  16. 16. A text is best regarded as a semantic unit, a unit not of form but of meaning
  17. 17. Literacy is the sharing of meaning through symbols
  18. 18. What patterns are noticeable when we look at media literacy over time?
  19. 19. Should media literacy education empower or protect? 1993
  20. 20. LOVE HATE PRINT VISUAL SOUND DIGITAL EMPOWERMENT – PROTECTION PARADIGM
  21. 21. Mapping
  22. 22. Should the media industry help to advance media literacy education? 1999
  23. 23. Understanding New Media National Association of Educational Broadcasters, 1960 This two-volume text was written by Marshall McLuhan and commissioned by the National Association of Educational Broadcasters. It proposed to provide an approach to media and a syllabus for teaching the nature and effects of media in secondary schools.
  24. 24. The History of Media Industry Involvement in Media Literacy • Understanding New Media NAEB, 1960 • Television Information Office NAB, 1962 • Visual Learning Kodak, 1969 • Creating Critical Viewers ABC, 1991 • Know TV Learning Channel, 1994 • Assignment: Media Literacy Discovery Channel, 1998 • Taking Charge of Your TV NCTA, 2001 • Messages & Meanings NAA Foundation, 2001 • Media Smart UK British Advertisers, 2002 • Adobe Youth Voices Adobe, 2006 • Google Digital Literacy & Citizenship Google, 2011 Hobbs, R. (2016). Literacy: Understanding media and how they work. In R. G. Picard (Ed.), What Society Needs from Media in the Age of Digital Communication (pp. 131 – 160). Porto: Media XXI.
  25. 25. 2012 Google Digital Literacy & Citizenship 1962 NAB Television in Today’s Society 50 YEARS
  26. 26.  13 scripts / lecture notes  Target audience: college students and adults  Worksheets / quizzes / slides / reading list / recommendations for supplemental 16mm films  Acknowledges the pleasure people experience with television as a leisure activity  Multiple points of view from both inside and outside the industry  Much background information about how television works, including reflection on the unintended consequences of advertising-supported economic model National Association of Broadcasters
  27. 27.  3 videos / lesson plans  Target audience: Grades 6 – 8 (ages 11 – 13)  Goals: Increase knowledge of tools offered by Google/YouTube to detect inaccuracies and protect oneself from inappropriate content  Little background information about how the Internet works  Tone conveys sense of urgency to follow the “do’s and don’ts”  Positions multiple points of view online as a “problem” that needs to be solved
  28. 28. The Need to Identify Embedded Values in Curriculum Materials
  29. 29. EMPOWERMENT – PROTECTION PARADIGM
  30. 30. Pedagogy: scripted lecture/video plus discussion No focus on inquiry |critical analysis | media production
  31. 31. Learners should create media to represent their learning Blog – image – audio – podcast animation – video – screencast – vlog remix – social media
  32. 32. How can we better understand the competing narratives of digital and media literacy?
  33. 33. Mapping Intellectual History As a network of relationships between people and ideas Hobbs, R. (Ed). (2016). Exploring the Roots of Digital and Media Literacy through Personal Narrative. Philadelphia: Temple University Press  Lance Strate on Marshall McLuhan  Henry Jenkins on John Fiske  David Weinberger on Martin Heidegger  Gianna Cappello on Theodor Adorno  Vanessa Domine on Neil Postman  Jeremiah Dyehouse on John Dewey  Renee Hobbs on Jerome Bruner  Mike Robb Grieco on Michel Foucault  Amy Peterson Jenson on Bertholt Brecht  and more
  34. 34. PEER-TO-PEER FILE SHARINGMy Intellectual Grandparents DEWEY. Communication & education are linked together to enable democratic societies BRUNER. Asking questions is key to the development of critical thinking skills FREIRE. Awareness, analysis creation & reflection enable people to take action against injustice McLUHAN. Media & technology are immersive cultural environments that restructure human perception and values HALL. Audiences are active. Meaning-making is shaped by lived experience & cultural context Network of relationships between people & ideas
  35. 35. www.grandparentsofmedialiteracy.com
  36. 36. www.grandparentsofmedialiteracy.com
  37. 37. www.grandparentsofmedialiteracy.com
  38. 38. www.grandparentsofmedialiteracy.com
  39. 39. www.grandparentsofmedialiteracy.com
  40. 40. By acknowledging our different intellectual grandparents, we can build trust & respect for diverse perspectives
  41. 41. Which concepts from the past should be recovered?
  42. 42. DEMYSTIFICATION THROUGH CRITICAL ANALYSIS
  43. 43. www.mindovermedia.tv
  44. 44. www.mindovermedia.tv
  45. 45. www.mindovermedia.tv
  46. 46. the practice of obtaining information or input by enlisting the services of a large number of people typically via the Internet CROWDSOURCING
  47. 47. CO-LEARNING Flattening authority hierarchies between teachers and learners
  48. 48. Summer Institute in Digital Literacy University of Rhode Island July 15 – 20, 2018 www.digiURI.com
  49. 49. THE PEDAGOGY OF INQUIRY
  50. 50. THE PEDAGOGY OF INQUIRY How does Google autocomplete work? Why is my browser history so valuable? Why does my Facebook look so different from yours? How does Amazon know how to make such good recommendations for me?
  51. 51. PEER-TO-PEER FILE SHARING Review Media literacy education evolves in response to changes in media, technology, education, and the cultural environment Competing narratives of media literacy require us to respect the multidisciplinary traditions of scholars, practitioners and policymakers Historical research helps us understand how media literacy practice reflects a complex and individualized network of relationships between people and ideas over time Educators and scholars should retrieve the concepts of inquiry, demystification and time/space/place as they develop the theory and practice of media literacy to meet the needs of today’s learners
  52. 52. CONTACT INFORMATION: Renee Hobbs Professor of Communication Studies Director, Media Education Lab Harrington School of Communication & Media University of Rhode Island USA Email: hobbs@uri.edu Twitter: @reneehobbs LEARN MORE Web: www.mediaeducationlab.com

×