Participation and Media

545 views

Published on

Renee Hobbs gives a talk at Ruhr University on September 17, 2013.

Published in: Education, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Participation and Media

  1. 1. Participation and Media Renee Hobbs Professor and Founding Director Harrington School of Communication and Media University of Rhode Island USA Email: hobbs@uri.edu Twitter: reneehobbs Web: http://mediaeducationlab.com
  2. 2. Harrington School of Communication and Media University of Rhode Island USA
  3. 3. www.mediaeducationlab.com
  4. 4. www. MediaEducationLab.com
  5. 5. LOVE HATE PRINT VISUAL SOUND DIGITAL What is your own love-hate relationship to media, technology and popular culture?
  6. 6. PEER-TO-PEER FILE SHARING How education responds to changes in society and technology How technologies reshape the nature of knowledge Why a shift from passive viewing to active analysis and creative authorship of media texts supports education and literacy development How engagement with digital media and popular culture can stimulate intellectual curiosity Goals for Today’s Session
  7. 7. Expanding the Concept of Text
  8. 8. A university-school partnership program designed to strengthen children’s ability to think for themselves, communicate effectively, and use their powerful voices to contribute to the quality of life in their families, their schools, their communities, and the world. Increase school relevance by connecting classroom to contemporary culture
  9. 9. How do learners develop digital media competencies? What knowledge and competencies do they need? No Such Thing as “Digital Natives”
  10. 10. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Downloaded music from the Internet Created a personal webpage Gotten information from the Internet Visited Facebook Used a digital camera to take a photo Uploaded a photo Used a computer program to create or design pictures Made an avatar of myself Create a profile for myself on Facebook Created a blog Used instant messaging or chat None of these RBCS WES Children ages 9 - 11 engage in a wide variety of online activities
  11. 11. Key Concepts of Media Literacy
  12. 12. Messages are Representations
  13. 13. Messages are Representations Messages Use Different Codes and Conventions
  14. 14. Messages are Representations People Interpret Messages Differently Messages Use Different Codes and Conventions
  15. 15. Messages are Representations People Interpret Messages Differently Messages Use Different Codes and Conventions Messages Have Economic & Political Power
  16. 16. Messages are Representations Messages Influence our Attitudes and Behaviors People Interpret Messages Differently Messages Use Different Codes and Conventions Messages Have Economic & Political Power
  17. 17. NEW RELATIONSHIPS NEW TEXTS NEW TOOLS
  18. 18. Understanding & Using Social Power Fitting In Standing Out
  19. 19. Talking to Anyone about Anything LINK ... and keeping secrets from parents and adults
  20. 20. Transgressing Social Norms
  21. 21. Empowerment and protection are two sides of the same coin
  22. 22. what is the Internet for?
  23. 23. Dance Like Lady Gaga Do Research at the Virtual School Library
  24. 24. LINK
  25. 25. LINK
  26. 26. www.storify.com
  27. 27. digital & media literacy helps build bridges between classroom and culture
  28. 28. Freedom of Choice Self-Directed Participation Questioning Interpretation – Meaning Making Analysis - Synthesis Creative Composition Collaboration Sharing - Dissemination
  29. 29. closing the gap between classroom & culture creates relevance
  30. 30. relevance ignites intellectual curiosity
  31. 31. intellectual curiosity fuels lifelong learning
  32. 32. Hobbs, R. & Moore, D. (2013). Discovering media literacy: Teaching digital media and popular culture in elementary school. Thousand Oaks: Corwin/Sage. Hobbs, R. (2013). Improvization and strategic risk taking in informal learning with digital media literacy. Learning, Media and Technology, 38(2), 1 – 28. Hobbs, R. & RobbGrieco, M. (2012). African-American children’s active reasoning about media texts as a precursor to media literacy. Journal of Children and Media 6(4), 502 - 519. Grafe, S., Hobbs, R., Boos, M., Bergey, B. (2012). Teachers´ motivations for media education in Germany and in the United States. Paper presentation at Digital Media and Learning(DML) Conference, Los Angeles. Hobbs, R., Ebrahimi, A., Cabral, N., Yoon, J., & Al-Humaidan, R. (2011). Field-based teacher education in elementary media literacy as a means to promote global understanding. Action for Teacher Education 33, 144 – 156. Hobbs, R., Yoon, J., Al-Humaidan, R., Ebrahimi, A. & Cabral, N. (2011). Online digital media in elementary school. Journal of Middle East Media 7(1), 1 – 23. “Messy Engagement and Strategic Risk Taking as an Instructional Strategy in Informal Learning,” Paper presentation, International Communication Association (ICA), Phoenix, AZ. May 28, 2012. Hobbs, R. , Cohn-Geltner, H. & Landis, J. (2011). Views on the news: Media literacy empowerment competencies in the elementary grades. In C. Von Feilitzen, U. Carlsson & C. Bucht (Eds.). New questions, new insights, new approaches. The International Clearinghouse on Children, Youth and Media. NORDICOM. University of Gothenburg, Sweden (pp. 43 – 56).
  33. 33. Renee Hobbs Professor and Founding Director Harrington School of Communication and Media University of Rhode Island USA Email: hobbs@uri.edu Twitter: reneehobbs Web: http://mediaeducationlab.com

×