Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Mind Over Media: Analyzing Contemporary Propaganda Workshop

1,488 views

Published on

This 3-hour workshop offers ideas about how to teach about contemporary propaganda to learners from all around the world. We consider the potential of media literacy to address issues of radicalization and extremism.

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

Mind Over Media: Analyzing Contemporary Propaganda Workshop

  1. 1. Mind Over Media: Analyzing Contemporary Propaganda Renee Hobbs Media & Learning 2016 Brussels, Belgium March 9, 2016
  2. 2. www.mediaeducationlab.com
  3. 3. Media systems are expanding
  4. 4. Literacy is expanding
  5. 5. Media literacy is an expanded conceptualization of literacy Listening + Speaking Reading + Writing Analyzing Media + Creating Media
  6. 6. Literacy is the sharing of meaning through symbols
  7. 7. ACCESS expanding the concept of literacy
  8. 8. Key Concepts of Media Literacy
  9. 9. Media Literacy as a Civic Competency Media education is an essential step in the long march towards a truly participatory democracy, and the democratization of our institutions. Widespread media literacy is essential if all citizens are to wield power, make rational decisions, become effective change agents, and have an effective involvement with the media. -Len Masterman, 1985
  10. 10. Questioning All Forms of Authority Media literacy, because it emphasizes a critique of textual authority, invites students to identify the cultural codes that structure an author’s work, understand how these codes function as part of a social system, and disrupt the text through alternative interpretations. In learning to critically read media messages, citizens are developing the abilities to gather accurate, relevant information about their society and to question authority (both textual and, by implication, institutional). - Renee Hobbs, 1998
  11. 11. Effective Creators and Communicators A truly participatory democracy relies on citizens’ efforts to develop and share their unique perspectives on societal issues, as well as developing new approaches to creating and circulating these perspectives. -Henry Jenkins, 2006
  12. 12. Agents of Social Change When people have digital and media literacy competencies, they recognize personal, corporate and political agendas and are empowered to speak out on behalf of the missing voices and omitted perspectives in our communities. By identifying and attempting to solve problems, people use their powerful voices and their rights under law to improve the world around them. -Renee Hobbs, 2010
  13. 13. Goals for Today  Gain knowledge and deepen understanding of new forms of contemporary propaganda  Appreciate the value of new pedagogical approaches that advance people’s ability to critically analyze propaganda  Learn key strategies for offering professional development programs in media literacy to educators  Consider how media literacy can combat the rise of extremism
  14. 14. www.mindovermedia.tv
  15. 15. What is Propaganda? • Propaganda appears in a variety of forms • Propaganda is strategic and intentional • Propaganda aims to influence attitudes, opinions and behaviors • Propaganda can be beneficial or harmful • Propaganda may use truth, half-truths or lies • To be successful, propaganda taps into our deepest values, fear, hopes and dreams • Propaganda uses any means to accomplish its goal
  16. 16. Where is Propaganda Found? Journalism & Public Relations Advertising Government Education Entertainment Advocacy
  17. 17. REFLECT Why Teaching About Propaganda Matters  How did you learn about propaganda when you were in school?  What new forms of propaganda have emerged in your lifetime?  What factors have contributed to the decline of teaching and learning about contemporary propaganda?
  18. 18. Rate Examples
  19. 19. CrowdsourcedContent
  20. 20. Propaganda: Beneficial or Harmful?
  21. 21. Teaching About Propaganda: Some History
  22. 22. Techniques of Propaganda ACTIVATE STRONG EMOTIONS ATTACK OPPONENTS SIMPLIFY INFORMATION & IDEAS RESPOND TO AUDIENCE NEEDS
  23. 23. Message: What is the nature of the information and ideas being expressed? Techniques: What symbols and rhetorical strategies are used to attract attention and activate emotional response? What makes them effective Means of Communication & Format: How did the message reach people and what form does it take? Environment: Where, when and how may people have encountered the message? Audience Receptivity: How may people think and feel about the message and how free they are to accept or reject it? CONTEXT
  24. 24. Digital Media Literacy Smartphone
  25. 25. www.mindovermedia.tv
  26. 26. Custom Classroom Galleries http://propaganda.mediaeducationlab.com/browse/terrorism
  27. 27. Connecting to Curriculum Standards
  28. 28. Connecting to Curriculum Standards
  29. 29. New Propaganda Social Sharing
  30. 30. 30-minute documentary was viewed 112 million times in just 7 days between March 6 – 12, 2012
  31. 31. VIRALITY when information, an image or video gets circulated rapidly and widely from one Internet user to another
  32. 32. Artist? Activist? Journalist? Jason Russell
  33. 33. All works of human creativity are ‘open’ and ‘unstable,’ susceptible to a wide range of interpretations. As readers/viewers/listeners, we are the critical agents in the meaning-making process.
  34. 34. Perhaps the “almost true” is potent precisely because the audience has to bridge the gap of truth and in so doing become complicit in its viral spreading. The almost true needs us in a way that the actual truth does not. This is an established principle of theatre, of art, that the audience completes the illusion—makes it more real than real. --Anthony Wing Kosner
  35. 35. Find an Example of Propaganda to Share on Your Social Network
  36. 36. New Propaganda Content Marketing
  37. 37. Recognizing Sponsored Content What is it? • What types of sponsored content do you see on your social media pages? • What types of native advertising or sponsored content do you find on other websites you visit? • How can you tell that is it is sponsored content? Why is it there? • How does the sponsored content fit into the overall page? • Would a user be likely to recognize it as an ad? Why or why not? • Why did you receive this particular kind of native advertising or sponsored content? • What information was gathered about you in order for this content to be placed here?
  38. 38. What impact does it have? • What do online marketers know about you? • Does it matter to you how much they know? Why or why not? • What are the potential consequences of online ad personalization? • Is sponsored content beneficial or harmful? Look at your Facebook or social media pages and find examples of sponsored content. Take a screenshot and upload it to the Mind Over Media website. Recognizing Sponsored Content
  39. 39. Close Analysis Through Digital Annotation http://bit.ly/antkorea
  40. 40. As both consumers and creators of media, what do we need to know and be able to do? • Learn to recognize new forms of propaganda in everyday life • Practice skills of interpretation, critical analysis & responsible media-making • Consider how context shapes the way messages are understood • Reflect with others on our diverse interpretations of media messages in ways that promote understanding of and respect for others’ perspectives • Shift from passive receivers to critically engaged participants in global public discourse
  41. 41. Some “Good Practices” 1. Choice and Relevance. Crowdsourced digital media content ensures that examples, topics and issues are continually relevant to how learners experience propaganda in everyday life 2. Beneficial or Harmful. Positioning propaganda as potentially beneficial prevents demonization or “othering” of propagandists 3. Respect for Difference. Focus on sharing interpretations promotes respect for divergent opinions, attitudes and beliefs 4. Context and Close Analysis. Focus on context (not only techniques) deepens analysis competencies and demonstrates the authentic value of intellectual curiosity and knowledge
  42. 42. PointofView
  43. 43.  Personal grievances or need for adventure  Sense of righteousness about the cause  Feelings of personal & political empowerment  Active participation in social networks  High levels of poverty & unemployment RADICALIZATION
  44. 44. Goals for Today  Appreciate the need for new pedagogical approaches that advance people’s ability to critically analyze propaganda  Gain knowledge and deepen understanding of new forms of contemporary propaganda  Discuss some ”good practices" for teaching about propaganda  Learn key strategies for offering professional development programs in media literacy to educators  Consider how media literacy can combat the rise of extremism
  45. 45. Media Literacy as a Civic Competency Media education is an essential step in the long march towards a truly participatory democracy, and the democratization of our institutions. Widespread media literacy is essential if all citizens are to wield power, make rational decisions, become effective change agents, and have an effective involvement with the media. -Len Masterman, 1985
  46. 46. www.mediaeducationlab.com
  47. 47. Renee Hobbs Professor of Communication Studies Director, Media Education Lab Harrington School of Communication and Media University of Rhode Island USA Email: hobbs@uri.edu Twitter: @reneehobbs WEB: www.mediaeducationlab.com

×