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Media Literacy: Connecting Classroom and Culture

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Professor Renee Hobbs introduces five ideas about media literacy to educators, librarians and future media professionals in Croatia.

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Media Literacy: Connecting Classroom and Culture

  1. 1. Digital & Media Literacy: Connecting Classroom and Community Renee Hobbs MEDIA LITERACY FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS (ML4T) University of Zagreb, Croatia May 11, 2015
  2. 2. Harrington School of Communication and Media University of Rhode Island USA
  3. 3. www.mediaeducationlab.com
  4. 4. www.mediaeducationlab.com
  5. 5. PEER-TO-PEER FILE SHARING Questions for Today What is media literacy and why is it important? How is media literacy relevant to the elementary curriculum? What does media literacy look like in the classroom? What do students actually learn when they learn media literacy? How can teachers play a role in advancing media literacy?
  6. 6. Media literacy is a response to the contemporary cultural environment
  7. 7. How Many Do You Recognize?
  8. 8. Stakeholders in Digital & Media Literacy MEDIA&TECHACTIVIST GOVERNMENTLIBRARY EDUCATIONCREATIVE
  9. 9. Empowerment
  10. 10. How do Media Influence Us? Family Peers Community
  11. 11. Nutrition Substance Abuse Stereotypes Media Affects Attitudes & Behaviors
  12. 12. Sexuality Aggression Online Social Responsibility Media Affects Attitudes & Behaviors
  13. 13. Protection
  14. 14. Productive Tension between Empowerment & Protective Approaches
  15. 15. LOVE HATE PRINT VISUAL SOUND DIGITAL What is your own love-hate relationship with media, technology and popular culture?
  16. 16. Media literacy is an expanded conceptualization of literacy
  17. 17. Literacy is the sharing of meaning in symbolic form
  18. 18. expanding the concept of text What forms of media texts did you use before coming to this program today?
  19. 19. Rhetoric Print Literacy Visual Literacy Information Literacy Media Literacy Computer Literacy Critical Literacy News Literacy Digital Literacy Historical Context
  20. 20. PEER-TO-PEER FILE SHARING Communication & Education. Institutions of education, communication practices & democratic values are interconnected. Inquiry Learning. People learn best from experiences that are carefully supported or scaffolded to meet the needs of the learner. Critical Pedagogy. Awareness, analysis, and reflection enable people to take action to make society more just and equitable. Medium Theory. Media & technology are immersive cultural environments; media structures re-shape human perception & values. Active Audience Theory. Audiences are active; meaning-making is variable; lived experience & social context are key dimensions of interpretation. Theoretical Framework
  21. 21. Media literacy enables people to be lifelong learners
  22. 22. Children Interpret Media Messages Differently
  23. 23. We are socialized to be active or passive consumers of media
  24. 24. Media Literacy is a Lifelong Process
  25. 25. Media Literacy is a Lifelong Process
  26. 26. Media Literacy is a Lifelong Process What media content do you use now that you did not use when you were growing up? What media content did you use long ago that is not so important to you now?
  27. 27. Media literacy educators use a wide variety of instructional practices to advance core competencies
  28. 28. Accessing the Internet
  29. 29. ACCESS  Keyboard and mouse skills  Be familiar with hardware, storage and file management practices  Understand hyperlinking & digital space  Gain competence with software applications  Use social media, mobile, peripheral & cloud computing tools  Identify information needs  Use effective search and find strategies  Troubleshoot and problem-solve  Learn how to learn  Listening skills  Reading comprehension Defining Digital & Media Literacy Competencies
  30. 30. Analyze & Evaluate  Understand how symbols work: the concept of representation  Identify the author, genre, purpose and point of view of a message  Compare and contrast sources  Evaluate credibility and quality  Understand one’s own biases and world view  Recognize power relationships that shape how information and ideas circulate in culture  Understand the economic context of information and entertainment production  Examine the political and social ramifications of inequalities in information flows Defining Digital & Media Literacy Competencies
  31. 31. Create & Collaborate  Recognize the need for communication and self-expression  Identify your own purpose, target audience, medium & genre  Brainstorm and generate ideas  Compose creatively  Play and interact  Edit and revise  Use appropriate distribution, promotion & marketing channels  Receive audience feedback  Work collaboratively  Comment, curate and remix Defining Digital & Media Literacy Competencies
  32. 32. Reflect  Recognize how entertainment media communicate values & ideology  Understand how differences in values and life experience shape people’s media use and message interpretation  Appreciate risks and potential harms of digital media  Apply ethical judgment and social responsibility to communication situations  Understand how concepts of ‘private’ and ‘public’ are reshaped by digital media  Appreciate and respect legal rights and responsibilities (copyright, intellectual freedom, etc) Defining Digital & Media Literacy Competencies
  33. 33. What values are depicted in this episode of children’s entertainment media ?
  34. 34. Take Action  Acknowledge the power of communication to maintain the status quo or change the world  Participate in communities of shared interest to advance an issue  Be a change agent in the family & workplace  Participate in democratic self- governance  Speak up when you encounter injustice  Respect the law and work to change unjust laws  Use the power of communication and information to make a difference in the world Defining Digital & Media Literacy Competencies
  35. 35. Creating a Public Service Announcement
  36. 36. ACCESS expanding the concept of literacy
  37. 37. PEER-TO-PEER FILE SHARING When students can access, the power of choice activates intellectual curiosity When students can analyze, they have critical autonomy – control over their interpretations When students compose media, the discover the power of collaboration as a key dimension of human creativity When students reflect, they consider the impact of their communication on themselves and others and develop a sense of social responsibility When students act, they use of the power of information and communication to make a difference in the world Learning Outcomes
  38. 38. Media literacy educators are passionate about its transformative value and research is demonstrating its effectiveness
  39. 39. Teacher Leadership is at the Heart of Media Literacy Education • Book Clubs • Tech Tuesday Sessions • Teachers Teaching Teachers • After-School & Summer Programs • Graduate Programs • Curriculum Development • Participatory Action Research • Sharing and Discussion of Student Work • Advocacy and community building • University-school partnerships
  40. 40. What happens when children and teens learn to critically analyze and create media?
  41. 41. Improves learning across the curriculum ResearchEvidence
  42. 42. How Do How Attitudes towards News Media, Media Literacy and Video Production Contribute to Adolescent Civic Engagement? Inspires leadership & entrepreneurial thinking ResearchEvidence
  43. 43. AUTHORSHIP Creative sills Collaboration skills Technical skills MEDIA ANALYSIS SKILLS Comprehension Identify Purpose Recognize Point of View ATTITUDES Giving & Receiving Feedback Intellectual Curiosity CIVIC ENGAGEMENT Sign an online petition Express an opinion to news media Blog about an issue Write an opinion letter QUALITY OF MEDIA CHOICES Increases civic engagement
  44. 44. Inspires confidence to ask questions ResearchEvidence
  45. 45. Promotes collaboration and creativity ResearchEvidence
  46. 46. Increases motivation & engagement ResearchEvidence
  47. 47. Promotes reflective thinking about communication ethics ResearchEvidence
  48. 48. Connects classroom and community ResearchEvidence
  49. 49. Prepares learners for an unknowable future
  50. 50. PEER-TO-PEER FILE SHARING Conclusion Media literacy is a response to the contemporary cultural environment Media literacy enables people to be lifelong learners Media literacy is an expanded conceptualization of literacy Media literacy educators use a wide variety of instructional practices to advance five core competencies Media literacy educators are passionate about its transformative value and research is demonstrating its effectiveness
  51. 51. www.mediaeducationlab.com
  52. 52.  Martens, H. & Hobbs, R. (2015, April). How media literacy supports civic engagement in a digital age. Atlantic Journal of Communication 23(2), 120 – 137. DOI:10.1080/15456870.2014.96163  Hobbs, R., He, H. & RobbGreico, M. (2014) Seeing, Believing and Learning to be Skeptical: Supporting Language Learning through Advertising Analysis Activities. TESOL Journal.  Hobbs, R., Donnelly, K., Friesem, J. & Moen, M. (2013). Learning to engage: How positive attitudes about the news, media literacy and video production contribute to adolescent civic engagement. Educational Media International 50(4), 231 – 246.  Hobbs, R. (2013). Improvization and strategic risk taking in informal learning with digital media literacy. Learning, Media and Technology, 38(2), 182-197.  Hobbs, R., Yoon, J., Al-Humaidan, R., Ebrahimi, A. & Cabral, N. (2011). Online digital media in elementary school. Journal of Middle East Media 7(1), 1 – 23.  Hobbs, R., Ebrahimi, A., Cabral, N., Yoon, J., & Al-Humaidan, R. (2011). Field-based teacher education in elementary media literacy as a means to promote global understanding. Action for Teacher Education 33, 144 – 156.  Hobbs, R., Cohn-Geltner, H. & Landis, J. (2011). Views on the news: Media literacy empowerment competencies in the elementary grades. In C. Von Feilitzen, U. Carlsson & C. Bucht (Eds.). New questions, new insights, new approaches. The International Clearinghouse on Children, Youth and Media. NORDICOM. University of Gothenburg, Sweden (pp. 43 – 56).  Hobbs, R., Cohn-Geltner, H. & Landis, J. (2011). Views on the news: Media literacy empowerment competencies in the elementary grades. In C. Von Feilitzen, U. Carlsson & C. Bucht (Eds.). New questions, new insights, new approaches. The International Clearinghouse on Children, Youth and Media. NORDICOM. University of Gothenburg, Sweden (pp. 43 – 56).  Hobbs, R. and RobbGrieco, M. (2010). Passive dupes, code breakers, or savvy users: Theorizing media literacy education in English language arts. In D. Lapp and D. Fisher (Eds.), Handbook of research on teaching the English language arts. Third edition. New York: Routledge (pp. 283 – 289). www.mediaeducationlab.com
  53. 53. Renee Hobbs Professor of Communication Studies Director, Media Education Lab Harrington School of Communication and Media University of Rhode Island USA Email: hobbs@uri.edu Twitter: @reneehobbs WEB: www.mediaeducationlab.com

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