Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Mapping the Literacies:
Media, News and Information Literacies
Renee Hobbs
Harrington School of Communication and Media
Un...
Definitions of
Digital
Literacy
SKILLS & ABILITIES
➢ Computer Use and Knowledge
➢ Web Literacy
LITERACY
➢ Online Reading &...
Rhetoric
Print Literacy
Visual Literacy
Information Literacy
Media Literacy
Computer Literacy
Critical Literacy
News Liter...
Motivations
for Using Media & Technology
in Education
12
TAKE THE QUIZ: www.quiz.powerfulvoicesforkids.com
 History and Context
 Theory
 Pedagogy
 Motivations
 Challenges
INFORMATION LITERACY KEY CONCEPTS
1. Authority is constructed and contextual
2. Information creation is a process
3. Infor...
pedagogy of individualized learning
Teacher librarian
is a guide
PEDAGOGY
pedagogy of writing research papers
PEDAGOGY
PROFESSOR
You balance your interest in media and technology with a
clear connection to academic standards. You want to be ...
overreliance on simplistic heuristics?
Quality checklists
distort the process
of evaluating
information
A CHALLENGE
MEDIA LITERACY KEY CONCEPTS
1. All media messages are constructed
2. Each medium has different characteristics, strengths ...
protection and empowerment dialectic
PEDAGOGY
ACCESS
asking critical questions about popular culture
PEDAGOGY
ACCESS
a pedagogy of inquiry builds competencies
PEDAGOGY
DEMYSTIFIER
As a teacher, you “pull back the curtain” to help students see
how various forms of information and knowledge ...
how responsive to changes in media & tech?
open access
multitasking
transmediation
identity
curation
play
data ownership
r...
NEWS LITERACY KEY CONCEPTS
1. Free expression is the cornerstone of democracy.
2. Discerning fact from opinion is a basic ...
journalists become teachers
Case studies offer
insight on the values
of the craft
PEDAGOGY
focus on journalistic norms of verification
Learners get a behind
the scenes view of
editorial decision-
making
PEDAGOGY
PROFESSIONAL
You have high standards for your students’ work, and you
may be seen as the go-to media professional in your ...
is selling journalistic ideals a form of propaganda?
Producer-centered
views about about the
news media distort
and ideali...
Who Supports Which New Literacies and Why?
Teaching Simultaneously
Challenges & Preserves the Status Quo
In the dynamic future of expanding literacies…
Respect for differing motivations is key
REFERENCES
Hobbs, R. (in press). Where did media literacy come from? Uncovering the roots of media literacy through person...
Professor Renee Hobbs
Harrington School of Communication and Media
University of Rhode Island
Email: hobbs@uri.edu
Twitter...
Mapping the Literacies: Media, News, Information
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Mapping the Literacies: Media, News, Information

905 views

Published on

A panel discussion at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC), San Francisco, CA, August 7, 2015.

Published in: Education
  • Login to see the comments

Mapping the Literacies: Media, News, Information

  1. 1. Mapping the Literacies: Media, News and Information Literacies Renee Hobbs Harrington School of Communication and Media University of Rhode Island Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, San Francisco CA August 7, 2015
  2. 2. Definitions of Digital Literacy SKILLS & ABILITIES ➢ Computer Use and Knowledge ➢ Web Literacy LITERACY ➢ Online Reading & New Literacies ➢ Media Production & Composition ➢ Coding TEACHING WITH ➢ Technology Integration ➢ Digital Learning ➢ Blended Learning ➢ Connected Learning TEACHING ABOUT ➢ Information Literacy ➢ Media Literacy ➢ Internet Safety & Digital Citizenship
  3. 3. Rhetoric Print Literacy Visual Literacy Information Literacy Media Literacy Computer Literacy Critical Literacy News Literacy Digital Literacy Putting Literacy into Historical Context
  4. 4. Motivations for Using Media & Technology in Education 12 TAKE THE QUIZ: www.quiz.powerfulvoicesforkids.com
  5. 5.  History and Context  Theory  Pedagogy  Motivations  Challenges
  6. 6. INFORMATION LITERACY KEY CONCEPTS 1. Authority is constructed and contextual 2. Information creation is a process 3. Information has value 4. Research is an inquiry process 5. Scholarship is a conversation 6. Searching is a form of strategic exploration SOURCE: Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL, 2015) THEORY
  7. 7. pedagogy of individualized learning Teacher librarian is a guide PEDAGOGY
  8. 8. pedagogy of writing research papers PEDAGOGY
  9. 9. PROFESSOR You balance your interest in media and technology with a clear connection to academic standards. You want to be sure that media and technology are not used in the classroom for their own sake, but to gain content knowledge. Multimedia presentations, engaging websites, and educational technology serve the purpose of helping you deliver the core content and skills students need to master. Information Literacy: Focus on Content and Quality MOTIVATIONS
  10. 10. overreliance on simplistic heuristics? Quality checklists distort the process of evaluating information A CHALLENGE
  11. 11. MEDIA LITERACY KEY CONCEPTS 1. All media messages are constructed 2. Each medium has different characteristics, strengths and a unique language of construction 3. Media messages are produced for particular purposes 4. All media messages contain embedded values and points of view 5. People use their individual skills, beliefs and experience to construct meaning from media messages 6. Media and media messages can influence beliefs, attitudes values and the democratic process SOURCE: (National Association for Media Literacy Education, 2007) THEORY
  12. 12. protection and empowerment dialectic PEDAGOGY
  13. 13. ACCESS asking critical questions about popular culture PEDAGOGY
  14. 14. ACCESS a pedagogy of inquiry builds competencies PEDAGOGY
  15. 15. DEMYSTIFIER As a teacher, you “pull back the curtain” to help students see how various forms of information and knowledge are constructed. You emphasize the practice of critical thinking, helping students ask good “how” and “why” questions. WATCHDOG You are a natural critical thinker, aware of how economic systems and institutions influence our everyday lives, particularly through the media we use. You want your students and your peers to be more mindful of the ways that things are bought and sold. Who owns and controls the media content that we see, hear, read, and play with? You feel responsible for giving your students a “wake-up call” about the economic and institutional inner-workings of the technology and the world that surrounds them. Media Literacy: Focus on Media Systems MOTIVATIONS
  16. 16. how responsive to changes in media & tech? open access multitasking transmediation identity curation play data ownership representation surveillance addiction displacement propaganda A CHALLENGE Protection – empowerment paradigm limits pedagogical innovation
  17. 17. NEWS LITERACY KEY CONCEPTS 1. Free expression is the cornerstone of democracy. 2. Discerning fact from opinion is a basic skill and obligation. 3. When the process of gathering and reporting news is transparent, news and information are more meaningful, trusted and credible. 4. Effective communication of news and information requires synthesis of multiple sources into meaningful context and comprehension of its impact. 5. Information requires verification to be effective. 6. Information in today’s society must empower forums to give voice to citizens and to monitor the free flow of information. SOURCE: (Radio Television Digital News Directors Foundation, ND) THEORY
  18. 18. journalists become teachers Case studies offer insight on the values of the craft PEDAGOGY
  19. 19. focus on journalistic norms of verification Learners get a behind the scenes view of editorial decision- making PEDAGOGY
  20. 20. PROFESSIONAL You have high standards for your students’ work, and you may be seen as the go-to media professional in your school. You know how to push your students to understand and emulate the professional conventions that is important to being taken seriously in the world of media creation. To help students enter the real world of media creation, you bring other authors, professionals, and media-makers into your classroom to enrich the learning experience. News Literacy: Focus on Formats, Codes and Conventions MOTIVATIONS
  21. 21. is selling journalistic ideals a form of propaganda? Producer-centered views about about the news media distort and idealize A CHALLENGE
  22. 22. Who Supports Which New Literacies and Why?
  23. 23. Teaching Simultaneously Challenges & Preserves the Status Quo
  24. 24. In the dynamic future of expanding literacies…
  25. 25. Respect for differing motivations is key
  26. 26. REFERENCES Hobbs, R. (in press). Where did media literacy come from? Uncovering the roots of media literacy through personal narrative. Philadelphia: Temple University Press. Hobbs, R. & Tuzel, S. (in press). Teaching motivations for digital and media literacy: An examination of Turkish educators. British Journal of Educational Technology. Hobbs, R. & Moore, D.C. (2013). Discovering Media Literacy: Digital Media and Popular Culture in Elementary School. Thousand Oaks CA: Corwin/Sage. RobbGrieco, M. & Hobbs, R. (2013, July). A Field Guide to Media Literacy Education in the United States. Kingston, RI: Media Education Lab, University of Rhode Island. Hobbs, R. & Donnelly, K. Friesem, J. & Moen, M. . (2013, August). Evaluation of PBS NewsHour Student Reporting Labs. Kingston, RI: Media Education Lab. University of Rhode Island. Hobbs, R. (2011). The state of media literacy: A response to Potter. Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media 55(3), 419 – 430. Hobbs, R. (2010). Empowerment and protection: Complementary strategies for digital and media literacy education in the United States. Formare, 70. 1 – 17. Rome, Italy. Hobbs, R., Cohn-Geltner, H. & Landis, J. (2011). Views on the news: Media literacy empowerment competencies in the elementary grades. In C. Von Feilitzen, U. Carlsson & C. Bucht (Eds.). New questions, new insights, new approaches. The International Clearinghouse on Children, Youth and Media. NORDICOM. University of Gothenburg, Sweden (pp. 43 – 56). Hobbs, R. (2011). Connecting kids with news in their community. Nieman Reports 65(2), 48 – 51. Hobbs, R. and RobbGrieco, M. (2010). Passive dupes, code breakers, or savvy users: Theorizing media literacy education in English language arts. In D. Lapp and D. Fisher (Eds.), Handbook of research on teaching the English language arts. Third edition. New York: Routledge (pp. 283 – 289). Postman, N. (1969). Teaching as a Subversive Activity. New York: Basic Books. Postman, N. (1974). Teaching as a Conserving Activity. New York: Basic Books.
  27. 27. Professor Renee Hobbs Harrington School of Communication and Media University of Rhode Island Email: hobbs@uri.edu Twitter: @reneehobbs Web: www.mediaeducationlab.com

×