Hobbs Anti Circumvention Testimony

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Slides accompanying testimony of Renee Hobbs, seeking exemption from U.S. Copyright Office for media literacy education practices by teachers and students

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Hobbs Anti Circumvention Testimony

  1. 1. Rulemaking on Exemptions from Prohibition on Circumvention of Technological Measures that Control Access to Copyrighted Works Testimony of Renee Hobbs Temple University Philadelphia PA
  2. 2. What is Media Literacy?
  3. 3. Media Literacy is an Expanded Conceptualization of Literacy SPEAKING & LISTENING READING & WRITING CRITICAL VIEWING & MEDIA COMPOSITION --Aspen Institute Leadership Forum on Media Literacy, Washington DC (1993)
  4. 4. Media Literacy Offers Powerful Authors & Conceptual Audiences Themes for Exploring Messages & Multimedia Meanings Genres Representations & Realities
  5. 5. Key Concepts of Media Literacy 1. All media messages are constructed. 2. Media messages are produced within economic, social, political, historical and aesthetic contexts. 3. Interpretative meaning-making processes consist of an interaction between the reader, the text and the culture. 4. Media have unique 'languages,' characteristics which typify various forms, genres and symbol systems of communication. 5. Media representations play a role in people's understanding of social reality, affecting behaviors, attitudes and values.
  6. 6. Instructional Methods for Integrating ML Across the Curriculum 1. Teaching With Media & Technology 2. Making Connections with Out-of-School Literacies 3. Developing Information Access & Research Skills 4. Strengthening Message Analysis Skills 5. Composing Messages using Multimedia 6. Exploring Media Issues in Society 7. Sharing Ideas and Taking Action
  7. 7. Organizations Supporting the Code of Best Practices Association for College and Research Libraries (ACRL) National Association for Media Literacy Education (NAMLE) Action Coalition for Media Education (ACME) Visual Studies Division National Council of Teachers Of English International Communication Association (NCTE) (ICA)
  8. 8. Components of 21st Century Skills Tool Competence Analysis, Critical Thinking and Ethical Judgment Creativity and Expression Teamwork and Collaboration
  9. 9. Education: Preparing Young People for Life in Contemporary Culture Functional Use-Based Exemption of CSS Circumvention is Essential for Media Literacy Education to Thrive
  10. 10. Proposal: Exemptions for Teachers and Students Using DVD Clips for Teaching and Learning of Media Literacy Education
  11. 11. Critique #1: Class of Users is too Broad Number of college graduates by discipline in 2006: 73,000 Communication/Film Majors 318,000 Business Majors 107,000 Education Majors 161,000 Social Science/History Majors
  12. 12. Critique #1: Class of Users is too Broad Number of college graduates by discipline in 2006: 73,000 Communication/Film Majors 318,000 Business Majors 107,000 Education Majors 161,000 Social Science/History Majors Number of high school dropouts in 2006: 3,500,000 Houston, Atlanta, Detroit, Chicago, Philadelphia, New York, Washington DC, Los Angeles, Phoenix
  13. 13. Critique #1: Class of Users is too Broad Number of college graduates by discipline in 2006: Everyone 73,000 Communication/Film Majors 318,000 Business Majors needs media literacy 107,000 Education Majors education! 161,000 Social Science/History Majors Number of high school dropouts in 2006: 3,500,000 Houston, Atlanta, Detroit, Chicago, Philadelphia, New York, Washington DC, Los Angeles, Phoenix
  14. 14. Critique #2: There are other options besides CSS circumvention
  15. 15. Lost Opportunities: Mrs. Scheffler’s High School English Class Goal: explore how depictions of romance in mass media shape people’s expectations about social relationships Learning Outcomes: 1. Recognize formulas, tropes and stereotypes about romance as presented in contemporary film and television 2. Identify formulas and stereotypes present in classic and contemporary literature 3. Reflect on how media may influence personal expectations about social relationships 4. Strengthen written expression and public speaking by responding to a personally meaningful film
  16. 16. Lost Opportunities: Mrs. Scheffler’s High School English Class Goal: explore how depictions of romance in mass media shape people’s expectations about social relationships Instructional Practices: 1. Students view and discuss teacher-created video which introduces the formulas, tropes and stereotypes about romance as presented in contemporary film and television 2. Teacher models an the practice of critical analysis using a contemporary film excerpt and an example from literature 3. Students select a personally meaningful film excerpt that depicts stereotypes about romance. They compose an analytic essay and make an oral presentation that comments on the film excerpt.
  17. 17. Mrs. Scheffler Can’t Teach this Lesson Anymore Her students don’t get the chance to reflect on how media depictions of romance shape their own understanding of social relationships
  18. 18. “The language of the image must be a stimulus for critical reflection, not an invitation to hypnosis.” -Umberto Eco

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