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Going Global?

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In the closing keynote to the Media Education Summit in Prague in 2014, Professor Hobbs shares insights gained from working with educators and researchers in Turkey, Russia, Brazil and Israel who are exploring media literacy pedagogy and practice at the elementary and secondary levels. She
describes and analyzes an example of a global media
literacy project that involved Turkish and American
middle-school students. Professor Hobbs considers
how teacher motivations regarding the use of digital
media interact with structural relationships between
government, school and higher education to produce
differential opportunities for innovation. She identifies the many flavors of digital literacy now circulating in contemporary culture and shows how collaborative global research in media literacy education can help researchers examine and question some fundamental assumptions and
expectations of the field.

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Going Global?

  1. 1. Going Global? International Perspectives on Innovation in Media Literacy Education Renee Hobbs Media Education Summit, Prague November 20, 2014
  2. 2. Do We Really Need a Global Media Literacy Research Community?
  3. 3. TOO MANY DIFFERENCES?
  4. 4. We advance the quality of digital and media literacy education through scholarship and community service. Teacher in-service workshops Media literacy & media production programs with youth Graduate certificate program Curriculum development Research and evaluation Advocacy and community building
  5. 5. PEER-TO-PEER FILE SHARING Theoretical Framework Communication & Education. Institutions of education and communication are interconnected in ways that may support democracy. Inquiry Learning. People develop intellectual curiosity by asking questions about what they experience in daily life. Critical Pedagogy. Awareness, analysis, and reflection enable people to take action to make society more just and equitable. Medium Theory. Media & technology are immersive cultural, political and economic environments; media structures re-shape human perception & values. Active Audience Theory. Meaning-making is variable; lived experience & social context shape practices of interpretation.
  6. 6. expanding the concept of literacy ACCESS CREATE ACT ANALYZEE REFLECT ACCESS
  7. 7. expanding the concept of text
  8. 8. expanding variety of approaches and terms SKILLS & ABILITIES ➢ Computer Use and Knowledge ➢ ICT Skills & Digital Skills LITERACY ➢ Online Reading & New Literacies ➢ Media Production / Youth Media ➢ Coding TEACHING WITH ➢ Technology Integration ➢ Digital Learning ➢ Blended Learning ➢ Connected Learning TEACHING ABOUT ➢ Information Literacy ➢ Media Literacy ➢ Internet Safety & Digital Citizenship
  9. 9. EDUCATION CREATIVE ARTS GOVERNMENT CIVIL SOCIETY ORGS TECH INDUSTRY ACTIVIST expanding variety of stakeholders
  10. 10. expanding variety of motivations and values
  11. 11. www.powerfulvoicesforkids.com DIGITAL HOROSCOPE QUIZ
  12. 12. Do We Really Need a Global Media Literacy Research Community?
  13. 13. Who? Where? What? How? Why? What are some of the most important differences? What are some of the most important similarities?
  14. 14. The Need For Global Innovation ● Shifting definitions of digital & media literacy ● New forms of media industry centralization ● Global tensions & competition on the rise ● Increased politicization of education ● Growing gap between in-school and out-of-school learning ● Uneven access to technology and competencies
  15. 15. International Visiting Scholars and Graduate Students  Sait Tuzel, Turkey  Yonty Friesem, Israel  Rawia AlHumaidan, Kuwait  Elizaveta Friesem, Russia  Wen Xu, China  Silke Grafe, Germany  Haixia He, China  Carla Viana Coscarelli, Brazil  Ibrahim Bilici, Turkey  Damiano Felini, Italy  Marketa Zezulkova, Czech Republic
  16. 16. International Visiting Scholars and Graduate Students  Sait Tuzel, Turkey  Yonty Friesem, Israel  Rawia AlHumaidan, Kuwait  Elizaveta Friesem, Russia  Wen Xu, China  Silke Grafe, Germany  Haixia He, China  Carla Viana Coscarelli, Brazil  Ibrahim Bilici, Turkey  Damiano Felini, Italy  Marketa Zezulkova, Czech Republic
  17. 17. What Can be Learned Through Cross-National Comparison of Media Literacy Initiatives?
  18. 18. Russia Challenges ● Media literacy is conceptualized as protection against bad [Western] media ● Disparities in access to technology ● National curriculum with strong lecture tradition and teacher-centered focus Opportunities ● Active university research community ● Film clubs and youth film production tradition is significant ● Access to digital technology enables global conversations between educators & students
  19. 19. Innovation in Media Literacy Education is Deeply Situational & Contextual
  20. 20. Brazil Challenges ● Little tradition of interdisciplinary work ● Disparities in access to technology ● Little focus on media/technology in teacher education Opportunities ● Strong tradition of innovation in literacy education ● Government financial support for technology ● Deep appreciation of connections between formal & informal learning
  21. 21. Project Redigir SOURCE: Redigir http://www.letras.ufmg.br/redigir/
  22. 22. Israel Challenges ● Diverse purposes and goals for media literacy education ● Religious diversity contributes to disparities ● Lack of connection between K-12, research and university scholars in education or media studies Opportunities ● Elective courses in Media are normative ● Venture capital & entrepreneurship in edtech ● Government financial support for innovation in education, media and technology sectors ● Growing appreciation of connections between formal & informal learning
  23. 23. Small Scale Programs Contribute to Innovation When Experience is Shared Authentically within the Knowledge Community
  24. 24. United States Challenges ● Digital and media literacy definitions are divergent ● Local control of schools lead to significant disparities ● Testing culture discourages innovation Opportunities ● Specialists including librarians & technology specialists may support innovation ● Venture capital & entrepreneurship in edtech : new digital resources ● Growing appreciation of connections between formal & informal learning ● Wide variety of PD experiences and providers with many connections between university, K-12 & research
  25. 25. Supporting Language Learning through Advertising Analysis Activities Six-week teacher action research project designed to explore media literacy pedagogy in the context of ESL with new immigrants to the United States Subjects: High-School students ages 14 – 19 enrolled in the Newcomer Program at Benjamin Rush HS, Philadelphia RESEARCH METHODS Classroom observation Interviews with teachers Analysis of student work samples SOURCE: Hobbs, R., He, H. & RobbGreico, M. (2014) Seeing, Believing and Learning to be Skeptical: Supporting Language Learning through Advertising Analysis Activities. TESOL Journal.
  26. 26. CLOZE READING ACTIVITY Magazine | audience | context collaborated |purpose | targets message | attention | technique company | differently | represents persuade | lifestyle The Dettol _____________________ made this ad for a hand sanitizer. The authors are the company and the ad _____________ that they paid. They ______________ to create the ad. The ad was in People _____________________ on a full page next to an article about a movie star in April 2011. Readers saw the ad in this _____________________. The target _____________________ is people who ride the bus. Mostly working class people ride the bus. This ad also shows a woman, so maybe it _____________________ women more than men. 4. The most important _____________________ in the ad is that buses are not clean. When you hold a handle in the bus, you can get the germs of other people on the bus. The main _____________________ is that you must clean
  27. 27. Students select an ad to analyze and compose using a wiki
  28. 28. Turkey Challenges ● National curriculum is teacher-centered ● Big disconnect between research and K-12 education ● No tradition of continuing education for teachers ● Substantial divide between center & periphery ● Lack of access to Turkish digital content Opportunities ● Youth culture – most teachers are under age 30 ● Growth of private schools creates pressure to innovate ● Government funding for technology is available ● ICT and Media Literacy electives in middle-school
  29. 29. Cross-National University-School Partnership Program Six-week pilot project designed to explore media literacy pedagogy in the context of global communication Subjects: Middle-school children ages 11 – 13 and their teachers • SAINT MARK’S SCHOOL – San Rafael CA USA • Gokkusagi MIDDLE SCHOOL, Canakkale, Turkey RESEARCH METHODS Interviews with teachers Analysis of student work samples Classroom observation
  30. 30. Quabiz Mohammad Veysel Ozturk Dave Hickman
  31. 31. 1. Getting to Know You 2. Learning about Two Countries 3. Analyzing TV Shows that Feature High School 4. Discussing Current Events 5. Exchanging Student Videos about Daily Life
  32. 32. American students have only basic information about Turkish history, daily life and culture
  33. 33. Information sharing about Turkey includes student-curated images and links
  34. 34. American students lack knowledge of Turkish history, life and culture
  35. 35. As a result of popular culture, Turkish students have significant information about American culture
  36. 36. Students recognize how values are (mis) represented in entertainment television
  37. 37. Issues of Representation and Focus on Popular Culture Activate Critical Thinking about Personal & Social Identity in Relation to Culture & Values
  38. 38. Feelings of social and emotional connectedness
  39. 39. Global Partnerships Promote Innovation to Advance New Knowledge in the Field
  40. 40. ANALYSIS OF POPULAR CULTURE IN SCHOOL. Students can identify cultural values in the representation of school in popular television programs but cannot identify misrepresentation across culture. DISCUSSING CURRENT EVENTS IN SCHOOL. Turkish students are not comfortable talking about the current political situation in their country and American students cannot appreciate their reticence. AWARENESS OF POWER/KNOWLEDGE GAPS. American students gain new awareness of global power imbalances as they confront their own lack of access to global popular culture through online interpersonal communication.
  41. 41. What Can be Learned Through Cross-National Comparison of Media Literacy Initiatives?
  42. 42.  RELATIONSHIPS. Develop personal relationships through information sharing to promote trust and respect  COLLABORATION. Experiment and take risks by discovering new approaches to collaboration  VALUES. Appreciate opportunities and challenges within a particular values framework, cultural or institutional context  REFLECTION. Analyze one’s own attitudes and challenge assumptions & stereotypes through social engagement  TAKE ACTION. Work together to combat inequity, prejudice and discrimination Media Literacy is a Movement
  43. 43. Why Do We Need Global Media Literacy Education? Relationships Collaboration Values Reflection Action
  44. 44. Conclusion  Innovation in media literacy education is deeply situational and contextual  Small scale programs contribute to innovation when experience is shared authentically within the knowledge community  Issues of representation and focus on popular culture activate critical thinking about personal and social identity in relation to culture and values  Global partnerships promote innovation to advance new knowledge in the field
  45. 45. 12 Definitions of Digital Literacy SKILLS & ABILITIES ➢ Computer Use and Knowledge ➢ ICT Skills & Digital Skills LITERACY ➢ Online Reading & New Literacies ➢ Media Production & Composition ➢ Coding TEACHING WITH ➢ Technology Integration ➢ Digital Learning ➢ Blended Learning ➢ Connected Learning TEACHING ABOUT ➢ Information Literacy ➢ Media Literacy ➢ Internet Safety & Digital Citizenship
  46. 46. 12 Definitions of Digital Literacy SKILLS & ABILITIES ➢ Computer Use and Knowledge ➢ ICT Skills & Digital Skills LITERACY ➢ Online Reading & New Literacies ➢ Media Production / Youth Media ➢ Coding TEACHING WITH ➢ Technology Integration ➢ Digital Learning ➢ Blended Learning ➢ Connected Learning TEACHING ABOUT ➢ Information Literacy ➢ Media Literacy ➢ Internet Safety & Digital Citizenship
  47. 47. expanding the concept of literacy ACCESS CREATE ACT ANALYZEE REFLECT ACCESS
  48. 48. EDUCATION CREATIVE ARTS GOVERNMENT CIVIL SOCIETY ORGS TECH INDUSTRY ACTIVIST expanding variety of stakeholders
  49. 49. We must embrace new approaches and new stakeholders who help us expand the concept of literacy
  50. 50. A Proposed Unifying Principle We use the power of information and communication to make a difference in the world
  51. 51. Hobbs, R., He, H. & RobbGreico, M. (2014) Seeing, Believing and Learning to be Skeptical: Supporting Language Learning through Advertising Analysis Activities. TESOL Journal. Hobbs, R. & Tuzel, S. (2014). “The Use of Media Literacy Instructional Strategies for Promoting Intercultural Communication in U.S. & Turkish Middle Schools.” Paper presentation to the International Association for Intercultural Communication Studies (IAICS). Providence, RI. August 1. Hobbs, R. & Friesem, L. (2014). “Connecting Continents.” Online professional development program with Russian educators. Russian Academy of Education, March 25. Hobbs, R. (2014). “How Teachers Motivations Shape Digital Learning.” Workshop presentation at SXSW Edu. Austin, TX. March 24. Hobbs, R. (2013). “Global Developments in Media Literacy Education,” Media and Digital Literacy Lab (MDLAB). Keynote address at the American University of Beirut, Lebanon. August 18. Hobbs (2011). “How Digital and Media Literacy Supports Global Understanding,” Arab-US Association of Communication Educators (AUSACE), Beirut, Lebanon, October 30. Hobbs, R., Yoon, J., Al-Humaidan, R., Ebrahimi, A. & Cabral, N. (2011). Online digital media in elementary school. Journal of Middle East Media 7(1), 1 – 23. Hobbs, R., Ebrahimi, A., Cabral, N., Yoon, J., & Al-Humaidan, R. (2011). Field-based teacher education in elementary media literacy as a means to promote global understanding. Action for Teacher Education 33, 144 – 156. www.mediaeducationlab.com
  52. 52. Renee Hobbs Professor of Communication Studies Director, Media Education Lab Harrington School of Communication and Media, University of Rhode Island USA Email: hobbs@uri.edu Twitter: @reneehobbs WEB: www.mediaeducationlab.com

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