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Everything You Need to Counter Misinformation Can Be Learned In Kindergarten

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Renee Hobbs explains why solving the problem of misinformation and disinformation requires media literacy education in the elementary grades. Learn more:

https://mediaeducationlab.com/hobbs-misinfo-con-kiev

Published in: Education
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Everything You Need to Counter Misinformation Can Be Learned In Kindergarten

  1. 1. The Global Information Ecosystem
  2. 2. Factors that May Help Address the Problem of Misinformation PRESS FREEDOM QUALITY JOURNALISM FACT CHECKING DIGITAL TOOLS PLATFORM ALGORITHMS LAW ENFORCEMENT REGULATION RESEARCH CIVIL SOCIETY EDUCATION
  3. 3. Renee Hobbs Professor of Communication Studies Director, Media Education Lab University of Rhode Island USA Twitter: @reneehobbs Access Slides: bit.ly/MLEKiev Everything You Need to Counter Misinformation Can be Learned in KindergartenMisInfoCon Kiev May 29, 2018 #misinfocon
  4. 4. Media literacy is an expanded conceptualization of literacy Media literacy is the ability to access, analyze, create, reflect and take action using media messages in a wide variety of forms Grass Roots Media Literacy in Eastern Europe
  5. 5. http://www.dkmk.hr
  6. 6. Media Literacy for Elementary Teachers (ML4T) May 2015
  7. 7. Igor Kanizaj and Renee Hobbs
  8. 8. PEER-TO-PEER FILE SHARING Where We Started What is media literacy and why is it important? How is media literacy relevant to the elementary curriculum? What does media literacy look like in the classroom? What do students actually learn when they learn media literacy? How can teachers play a role in advancing media literacy?
  9. 9. Discussion-Based Professional Development
  10. 10. 42 hours of hands-on, minds-on learning
  11. 11. LOVE HATE PRINT VISUAL SOUND DIGITAL Everyone has a love-hate relationship with media, technology and popular culture
  12. 12. www.mindovermedia.eu
  13. 13. www.mindovermedia.eu
  14. 14. Children strengthen reading comprehension while exploring how marketing & branding use information, entertainment & persuasion Persuade -- Inform -- Entertain
  15. 15. Teachers Analyzed TV Advertising By Creating a Screencast
  16. 16. PEER-TO-PEER FILE SHARING Key Ideas: Teacher Ed Children need practice to recognize how messages are designed to inform, entertain and persuade Consumer culture is an ideology that operates from cradle to grave & advertising funds most media institutions Media messages use many techniques to appeal to our identity and our emotions Through asking questions, children develop critical thinking skills about news, advertising, and social media
  17. 17. Teachers Create a TV Talk Show about Media Literacy
  18. 18. PEER-TO-PEER FILE SHARING Key Ideas: Teacher Ed Media analysis & production lessons can be done in “low tech” or “high tech” ways When learners create media, they appreciate how carefully messages are constructed and how deadline pressures may affect quality Media literacy can be integrated into all the subject areas of the curriculum Creating media messages promotes intellectual curiosity and high levels of engagement in learning
  19. 19. Recognize media genres
  20. 20. Recognize author’s purpose & target audiences
  21. 21. Interpret messages actively, not passively
  22. 22. Recognize & resist emotional appeals
  23. 23. Spot stereotypes
  24. 24. Notice omissions & inaccuracies
  25. 25. Make responsible decisions about online sharing
  26. 26. When Students Create Media
  27. 27. They Learn How Media Constructs Reality
  28. 28. Five Critical Concepts of Media Literacy
  29. 29. Messages are Representations
  30. 30. Messages are Representations People Interpret Messages Differently Messages Use Different Codes and Conventions
  31. 31. Messages are Representations People Interpret Messages Differently Messages Use Different Codes and Conventions Messages Have Economic & Political Power
  32. 32. Messages are Representations People Interpret Messages Differently Messages Use Different Codes and Conventions Messages Have Economic & Political Power Messages Use Different Codes and Conventions
  33. 33. Messages are Representations Messages Influence Attitudes and Behaviors People Interpret Messages Differently Messages Use Different Codes and Conventions Messages Have Economic & Political Power
  34. 34. Five Critical Concepts of Media Literacy
  35. 35. MEDIA LITERACY SMARTPHONE
  36. 36. Well-Prepared to Handle Misinformation
  37. 37. CONTACT INFORMATION: Renee Hobbs Professor of Communication Studies Director, Media Education Lab Harrington School of Communication & Media University of Rhode Island USA Email: hobbs@uri.edu Twitter: @reneehobbs LEARN MORE Web: www.mediaeducationlab.com

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