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Digital Authorship: A Pedagogy of Learning

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Renee Hobbs offers a lecture and workshop at the Summer Institute in Digital Literacy

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Digital Authorship: A Pedagogy of Learning

  1. 1. Digital Authorship: A Pedagogy of Learning Renee Hobbs Harrington School of Communication & Media University of Rhode Island Summer Institute in Digital Literacy 2016
  2. 2. Digital authorship is a form of social power. Digital authors enter into conversation with others in the culture when they choose to share their creative work. Digital authorship is a creative and collaborative process that involves experimentation and risk taking. People can choose whether (or not) to be socially responsible for the texts they create and share. Critical thinking about message form, content and context makes people better creators and consumers of digital and media messages. PREVIEW
  3. 3. My Story I began my career as a teacher educator in 1991
  4. 4. Beating of Rodney King by Los Angeles Police My Story I began my career as a teacher educator in 1991
  5. 5. Columbine High School, 1999
  6. 6. Columbine High School, 1999 PARTIAL LIST OF SCHOOL SHOOTINGS SINCE 2010 University of Alabama, Huntsville Aurora Central High School Millard South High School Chardon High School Sandy Hook Elementary School Hazard Community & Technical College Santa Monica College Arapahoe High School Marysville Pilchuck High School Unpqua Community College El Centro College
  7. 7. desensitization: feeling less shock or distress at scenes of cruelty, violence, or suffering as a result of overexposure to images or experiences priming: occurs when an experience or media message increases the salience of a particular mental concept cultivation: over time, exposure to mass media entertainment and news media shapes people’s perceptions of the world. imitation: a form of social learning where people view an act and are inspired to copy it
  8. 8. Diamond Reynolds live streams a video only minutes after police shoot Philando Castile four times in the passenger seat of her car, July 6, 2016
  9. 9. How some people address the polarization and apathy that are part of this cultural moment
  10. 10. As you watch, consider: How does this video depict the the social responsibilities of the communicator?
  11. 11. Pair share: How does this video depict the the social responsibilities of the communicator?
  12. 12. Digital authorship is a form of social power. Digital authors enter into conversation with others in the culture when they choose to share their creative work.
  13. 13.  Learn that communication can maintain the status quo or change the world  Participate in communities of shared interest to advance an issue  Be a change agent in the family & workplace  Participate in democratic self- governance  Speak up when you encounter injustice  Respect the law and work to change unjust laws  Use the power of communication and information to make a difference in the world
  14. 14. At any moment, the reader is ready to turn into a writer. -Walter Benjamin
  15. 15. Writers Enter into a Conversation Reading and writing are reciprocal processes of literacy
  16. 16. “The text does not release a single meaning, the ‘message’ of the author. A text is rather a tissue of quotations born of a multitude of sources in culture.” --Roland Barthes, “The Death of the Author,” 1967
  17. 17. digital & library resources are overwhelming
  18. 18. We know from Project Information Literacy that students actively try to reduce the number of choices they have to make in order to get their assignments done. We know from the Citation Project that first year college students who use sources in their writing rarely write about them with much understanding. They don’t summarize sources, they harvest quotes. Nearly half the time, the quotes they use are from the first page of the source. We
  19. 19. A Student PDF Annotation with Kami
  20. 20. A Student Annotates a Video with ANT
  21. 21. What is Evernote? Knowledge management tools are online platforms that help people find, organize and use digital resources
  22. 22. Finding and organizing information is a practice of digital authorship comprehension meaning interpretation
  23. 23. As you watch, consider: What does the metaphor of “scholarship as conversation” convey to learners?
  24. 24. Entering the Scholarly Conversation Burke, Kenneth. 1949. The Philosophy of Literary Form. Berkeley: University of California Press.
  25. 25. Keyboard and mouse skills Be familiar with hardware, storage and file management practices Understand hyperlinking & digital space Gain competence with software applications Use social media, mobile, peripheral & cloud computing tools Identify information needs Use effective search and find strategies Troubleshoot and problem-solve Learn how to learn Listening and reading comprehension When we access information and ideas, we enter into a conversation
  26. 26. Sharing is a Practice of Digital Authorship
  27. 27. Digital authorship is a creative and collaborative process that involves experimentation and risk taking. People can choose whether (or not) to be socially responsible for the texts they create and share.
  28. 28. Lone Wolf Collaborator Visions of Digital Authorship
  29. 29. Creativity is rooted in wonder & exuberance
  30. 30. Creativity is Combinatorial
  31. 31. Cloud-Based Digital Tools Support Digital Authorship Writing KidBlog Google Docs Titanpad Wikispaces Storybird Animation Animoto Powtoons Osnap Moovly Screencasting Screencastify Screencast-o-Matic Screenr Video Production YouTube WeVideo Videolicious Shadow Puppet Multimedia Kizoa Storify Coding Scratch Ready Infographics Infogr.am Easel.ly
  32. 32. “How do I get started?” Digital authorship as a learning process involves issues of creative control “What is our topic?” “When is it due?” “How long should it be?” “Do have to work with a partner?” “How do I get an A?”
  33. 33. Creating with digital tools involves a process of messy engagement
  34. 34. TEACHERSTUDENT FORMAT CONTENT DISTRIBUTION PROCESS Teachers make decisions about how much creative control to give to learners
  35. 35. Wallas, Graham. 1926. The Art Of Thought. New York: Harcourt Brace.
  36. 36. PREPARATION INCUBATION ILLUMINATION VERIFICATION Wallas, Graham. 1926. The Art Of Thought. New York: Harcourt Brace.
  37. 37. As you watch, consider: What creative and collaborative activities happened before the filming took place?
  38. 38. How to Take Care of Your Pet by Grade 1 Students at Russell Byers Charter School
  39. 39. Pair share: What creative and collaborative activities happened before the filming took place?
  40. 40.  Recognize the need for communication and self-expression Identify your own purpose, target audience, medium & genre Brainstorm and generate ideas Compose creatively using language, image, sound and multimedia Writing & speaking skills Editing & revising in response to feedback Use appropriate distribution, promotion & marketing channels Work collaboratively Comment, curate and remix
  41. 41. SLEEP How to improve your creative competencies as a digital author
  42. 42. Learners may infer from mass media and popular culture that behaving outrageous or goofy will bring them fame and fortune
  43. 43. Learners may infer from digital culture that being angry or mean will attract attention
  44. 44. Because creativity is uncontrollable, there’s a lot of bad art. Perfectionism Kills Creativitity
  45. 45. Creativity Police
  46. 46. When digital authors choose to explore issues of social responsibility, they can create works that provoke new ways of seeing, thinking and feeling.
  47. 47. Recognize how entertainment media communicate values & ideology Understand how differences in values and life experience shape people’s media use and message interpretation Appreciate risks and potential harms of digital media Apply ethical judgment and social responsibility to communication situations Understand how concepts of ‘private’ and ‘public’ are reshaped by digital media Appreciate & respect legal rights & responsibilities (copyright, intellectual freedom)
  48. 48. As you watch, consider: How does this video depict the benefits, risks and potential harms of mobile media?
  49. 49. I Forgot My Phone
  50. 50. Pair share: How does this video depict the benefits, risks and potential harms of mobile media?
  51. 51. Critical thinking about message form, content and context makes people better creators and consumers of digital and media messages.
  52. 52. Top 10 Media Companies in the World
  53. 53. Media Literacy as a Civic Competency Media education is an essential step in the long march towards a truly participatory democracy, and the democratization of our institutions. Widespread media literacy is essential if all citizens are to wield power, make rational decisions, become effective change agents, and have an effective involvement with the media. -Len Masterman, Teaching the Media, 1985
  54. 54. Questioning All Forms of Authority Media literacy, because it emphasizes a critique of textual authority, invites students to identify the cultural codes that structure an author’s work, understand how these codes function as part of a social system, and disrupt the text through alternative interpretations. In learning to critically read media messages, citizens are developing the abilities to gather accurate, relevant information about their society and to question authority (both textual and, by implication, institutional). - Renee Hobbs, “Seven Great Debates in the Media Literacy Movement,” 1998
  55. 55. Understand how symbols work: the concept of representation Identify the author, genre, purpose and point of view of a message Compare and contrast sources Evaluate credibility and quality Understand one’s own biases and world view Recognize power relationships that shape how information & ideas circulate in culture Understand the economic context of information and entertainment production Examine the political and social ramifications of inequalities in information flows
  56. 56. www.mindovermedia.tv
  57. 57. Digital Media Literacy Smartphone
  58. 58. ACCESS Digital and Media Literacy Competencies
  59. 59. Digital authorship is a form of social power. Digital authors enter into conversation with others in the culture when they choose to share their creative work. Digital authorship is a creative and collaborative process that involves experimentation and risk taking. People can choose whether (or not) to be socially responsible for the texts they create and share. Critical thinking about message form, content and context makes people better creators and consumers of digital and media messages. REVIEW
  60. 60. Digital Authorship Enables the Practice of Citizenship When people have digital and media literacy competencies, they recognize personal, corporate and political agendas and are empowered to speak out on behalf of the missing voices and omitted perspectives in our communities. By identifying and attempting to solve problems, people use their powerful voices and their rights under law to improve the world around them. -Renee Hobbs, Digital and Media Literacy: A Plan of Action, 2010
  61. 61. Renee Hobbs Professor of Communication Studies Director, Media Education Lab Harrington School of Communication & Media University of Rhode Island USA Email: hobbs@uri.edu Twitter: @reneehobbs LEARN MORE Web: www.mediaeducationlab.com
  62. 62. Four of a Kind Production Teams
  63. 63. Your Assignment Working with a team of 4 people, watch the AT&T ad, “Keep Calm Your Internet’s On” and discuss and analyze it using the five critical questions of media literacy. Then use a combination of images and some voice-over narration to produce a 2 to 4 minute video screencast, combining your voice over narration with images. Work with your team under deadline pressure to get the job done. Share your finished production online.
  64. 64. Your Screencast Mentor Text Renee and Rhys analyze a BrainPop video using the 5 critical questions of media literacy
  65. 65. ACCESS Screencasting the Critical Questions

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