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Analyzing Advertising ML4T Croatia

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Analyzing Advertising ML4T Croatia

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Professors Renee Hobbs and Igor Kanizaj explore strategies for critically analyzing advertising with elementary educators in Croatia

Professors Renee Hobbs and Igor Kanizaj explore strategies for critically analyzing advertising with elementary educators in Croatia

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Analyzing Advertising ML4T Croatia

  1. 1. Understanding, Analyzing and Creating Advertising, Persuasion & Propaganda Renee Hobbs MEDIA LITERACY FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS (ML4T) University of Zagreb, Croatia May 12, 2015
  2. 2. PEER-TO-PEER FILE SHARING Questions for Today Why is it important to teach children about advertising and marketing? What are the beneficial and harmful dimensions of persuasion, advertising and propaganda? How is this topic relevant to the elementary curriculum? What instructional strategies are effective for teaching children to critically analyze and create advertising in the classroom?
  3. 3. Consumer culture is an ideology that operates from cradle to grave
  4. 4. Children need practice to recognize how messages are designed to inform, entertain and persuade
  5. 5. www. Mindovermedia.tv
  6. 6. Propaganda can be used for beneficial or harmful purposes
  7. 7. Play & Learning about Media www.mypopstudio.com
  8. 8. Advertising links products with feelings by using many techniques to appeal to our identity, our emotions & our values
  9. 9. Doc.dr.sc. Igor Kanižaj Sveučilište u Zagrebu Fakultet političkih znanosti Studij novinarstva www.fpzg.unizg.hr Advertising techniques?
  10. 10. 1. Classical Advertising
  11. 11. Klasični oglasi
  12. 12. 2. Hidden advertising?
  13. 13. 18
  14. 14. 19
  15. 15. 20
  16. 16. 2. Product placement
  17. 17. 22
  18. 18. 23
  19. 19. 24
  20. 20. POWERED BY  MG NIVELA  SONY  T-MOBILE  DEEZER  KONZUM  JANA  LEDO 25
  21. 21. 3. Advertising in video games
  22. 22. Advertising and prime time TV programme  Lion King  RTL  6.12.2014.  20.05-21.55  Three commercial breaks  27 minutes  73 ads!  What can we do?
  23. 23. You can teach the children to count the ads they see…
  24. 24. AIDA – Frank Wobst A – attention I – interest D – desire A - action
  25. 25. Are there any good commericals for the family?
  26. 26. Creating Public Service Announcements in Grade 2
  27. 27. www.powerfulvoicesforkids.com
  28. 28. Media literacy educators use creative strategies to help children develop critical thinking skills about advertising, persuasion and propaganda
  29. 29. PEER-TO-PEER FILE SHARING Conclusion Consumer culture is an ideology that operates from cradle to grave Children need practice to recognize how messages are designed to inform, entertain and persuade Propaganda can be used for beneficial or harmful purposes Advertising links products with feelings by using many techniques to appeal to our identity and our emotions Media literacy educators use creative strategies to help children develop critical thinking skills about advertising, persuasion and propaganda
  30. 30.  Hobbs, R., He, H. & RobbGrieco, M. (2014). Seeing, believing and learning to be skeptical: Supporting language learning through advertising analysis activities. TESOL Journal DOI: 10.1002/tesj.153  Hobbs, R. (2013). The blurring of art, journalism and advocacy: Confronting 21st century propaganda in a world of online journalism. I/S: A Journal of Law and Policy for the Information Society 8(3), 625 – 638.  Hobbs, R. & RobbGrieco, M. (2012). African-American children’s active reasoning about media texts as a precursor to media literacy. Journal of Children and Media 6(4), 502 – 519.  Babad, E., Peer, A., & Hobbs, R. (2012). Media literacy and media bias: Are media literacy students less susceptible to non-verbal judgment biases? Psychology of Popular Media Culture.1(2), 97 – 107. DOI: 10.137/a0028181  Morris, N., Gilpin, D., Lenos, M. & Hobbs, R. (2011). Interpretations of cigarette advertisement warning labels by Philadelphia Puerto Ricans. Journal of Health Communication 16(8), 908 – 922.  Hobbs, R., Broder, S., Pope, H. & Rowe, J. (2006). How adolescent girls interpret weight-loss advertising. Health Education Research. 21(5), 719-730.  Hobbs, R. and Rowe, J. (2008). Creative remixing and digital learning: Developing an online media literacy tool for girls. In P. C. Rivoltella (Ed.). Digital literacy: Tools and methodologies for an information society. Hershey, PA: Idea Group Press (pgs. 230 – 241).  Hobbs, R. (2004). Does media literacy work? An empirical study of learning how to analyze advertisements. Advertising and Society Review 5(4), 1 – 28.  Hobbs, R. (2004). Analyzing advertising in the English language arts classroom: A quasi-experimental study. Studies in Media & Information Literacy Education, 4(2). Available online: http://www.utpress.utoronto.ca/journal/ejournals/simile  Denniston, R., Hobbs, R. & Arkin, E. (1998). Media literacy as a complementary strategy to social marketing. Social Marketing Quarterly 4(4), 40 – 42. www.mediaeducationlab.com
  31. 31. Renee Hobbs Professor of Communication Studies Director, Media Education Lab Harrington School of Communication and Media University of Rhode Island USA Email: hobbs@uri.edu Twitter: @reneehobbs WEB: www.mediaeducationlab.com

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