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Teachers who are  ready maximizestudent learning and  minimize student    misbehavior.                4
   Students are deeply involved with their work   Students know what is expected of them and    are generally successful...
   A task oriented environment   Is ready and waiting for students                                        6
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PUNISHMENT    VS. DISCIPLINE          13
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The number one problem in    the classroom is not discipline; it is the lack of  procedures and routines.                 ...
A smooth-running class is  the responsibility of theteacher, and it is the result of the teacher’s ability to     teach pr...
   What to do when the bell rings   What to do when the pencil breaks   What to do when you hear an emergency alert    ...
 Ifyou want it…teach it. If you  expect to maintain it, encourage it,  acknowledge it, and reinforce it.        source u...
“Always  say what you mean, and mean what you say…but don’t say it in a mean way.”     Nicholas Long                    ...
Routine   What do you   What is the signal?                expect?1.2.3.
Routine          Desired          Signal                 BehaviorEntering Class   Walk in, sit     Instruction on         ...
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Training of Trainers for the Mass  Training of Second Year Teachers  on the 2010 Secondary Education            Curriculum...
When students arelearning poorly, wecannot expect them to beready for further learning,or for work.
 Thegeneral tendency among teachers to teach for facts, rather than for thinking  Results of national and international a...
 Teaching practices that prevent our children from thinking  Teachers need to teach for   understanding, and do it by des...
 Learning as meaning-making Learning as integrative Authentic assessment
identify desired results;determine acceptable evidence;plan learning experiences and  instruction.      Source: Wiggins, G...
Essential                                                         Questions           Content/                       Essen...
Concept
UbD Facet                                           Facet DescriptionFacet 1: Explanation                   Sophisticated ...
Our curriculum goalAssessing our learners’ progressPlanning teaching and learning for   understanding
Content     What students should      Standards    know, understand                   and be able to do     Learning     S...
Content                            Standards   Level               Learning     of                StandardsUnderstanding  ...
 Assess  student’s readiness for learning for  understanding. Provide developmentally appropriate  interventions to brid...
Implementing UBD-based Learning                         Plans
classroom management review and facets of understanding
classroom management review and facets of understanding
classroom management review and facets of understanding
classroom management review and facets of understanding
classroom management review and facets of understanding
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classroom management review and facets of understanding

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classroom management review and facets of understanding

  1. 1. 3
  2. 2. Teachers who are ready maximizestudent learning and minimize student misbehavior. 4
  3. 3.  Students are deeply involved with their work Students know what is expected of them and are generally successful There is relatively little wasted time, confusion, or disruption The climate of the classroom is work- oriented, but relaxed and pleasant. 5
  4. 4.  A task oriented environment Is ready and waiting for students 6
  5. 5. 8
  6. 6. 9
  7. 7. 10
  8. 8. 11
  9. 9. 12
  10. 10. PUNISHMENT VS. DISCIPLINE 13
  11. 11. 14
  12. 12. The number one problem in the classroom is not discipline; it is the lack of procedures and routines. 15
  13. 13. A smooth-running class is the responsibility of theteacher, and it is the result of the teacher’s ability to teach procedures. 16
  14. 14.  What to do when the bell rings What to do when the pencil breaks What to do when you hear an emergency alert signal What to do when you finish your work early What to do when you have a question What to do when you need to go to the restroom How to enter the classroom Where to put completed work 17
  15. 15.  Ifyou want it…teach it. If you expect to maintain it, encourage it, acknowledge it, and reinforce it.  source unknown 18
  16. 16. “Always say what you mean, and mean what you say…but don’t say it in a mean way.”  Nicholas Long 19
  17. 17. Routine What do you What is the signal? expect?1.2.3.
  18. 18. Routine Desired Signal BehaviorEntering Class Walk in, sit Instruction on down, start work board
  19. 19. 22
  20. 20. Training of Trainers for the Mass Training of Second Year Teachers on the 2010 Secondary Education Curriculum (SEC)April 5-8 ,2011 , Manila Hotel ,City of Manila
  21. 21. When students arelearning poorly, wecannot expect them to beready for further learning,or for work.
  22. 22.  Thegeneral tendency among teachers to teach for facts, rather than for thinking Results of national and international assessments confirm our students’ poor conceptual understanding. Teaching has been too focused on covering the ground.
  23. 23.  Teaching practices that prevent our children from thinking Teachers need to teach for understanding, and do it by design.
  24. 24.  Learning as meaning-making Learning as integrative Authentic assessment
  25. 25. identify desired results;determine acceptable evidence;plan learning experiences and instruction. Source: Wiggins, G. and Kline, E. (2010). Understanding by Design (handout)
  26. 26. Essential Questions Content/ Essential Objectives Performance (knowledge/skills) Understandings StandardsResults/Outcomes Assessment Products/ Criteria/ Performances Tools Assessment Resources/ Learning Learning Plan Materials Activities
  27. 27. Concept
  28. 28. UbD Facet Facet DescriptionFacet 1: Explanation Sophisticated explanations and theoriesFacet 2: Interpretation Interpretations, narratives, and translationsFacet 3: Application Use knowledge in new situations and contextsFacet 4: Perspective Critical and insightful points of viewFacet 5: Empathy Ability to get inside another persons feelingsFacet 6: Self-knowledge To know ones ignorance, prejudice, and understanding Transition Services Preparation & Training Mach 2005
  29. 29. Our curriculum goalAssessing our learners’ progressPlanning teaching and learning for understanding
  30. 30. Content What students should Standards know, understand and be able to do Learning StandardsEU Performance What students should Standards create/add value to/ transfer
  31. 31. Content Standards Level Learning of StandardsUnderstanding EU Performance Standards Assessment Level of Performance
  32. 32.  Assess student’s readiness for learning for understanding. Provide developmentally appropriate interventions to bridge learning gaps. Check for understanding; monitor progress. Remediate, if necessary. Evaluate performance (transfer skills).
  33. 33. Implementing UBD-based Learning Plans

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