Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
FIGHTING CHESS

My Games and Career
Gary Kasparov

Translated by Eric Schiller
Career and Editing by Robert G Wade

B. T.B...
First published 1983
© G. I(asparov,  R. G.Wade

ISBN 0 71341984 9 (limp)

Printed and bound in Great Britain by
Biddles L...
Preface

.  . .11 who/1' galaxy rifxlrarig.  _v0uri_t; 'grzzndma. rIcr. r hay name to / heforz’. 
halh in I/1(’ USSR lUl(I...
Bibliography

The editor acknowledges the usefulness of source material from the
Soviet chess periodicals Shakrnaty of USS...
2 In the beginning .  . . 

That same evening of decision Gary‘s parents set up a position
from the local newspaper column...
4 In the beginning .  . . 

Kasparov said “In 1973 when I was still a boy whojust liked playing
chess Mikhail Moiseyevich ...
6 In the beginning .  . . 

Whatever happens to the world
title in 1975, most experts predict
that Karpav will be Fischerl...
8 In Ihe beginning .  . . 

®xd8 32 ‘Qxf8+ @117 33 flg7+
@138 34 gh8+ Q17 35 gf6+ figs
36 gd8+ QII7 37 gd7+ $36 38
§e8+ $75 ...
10 In the beginning.  . . 

Botvinnik,  commenting at the time on this game.  boldly asserted “In
the hand:  of thir young...
I2 A Thirteen Year Old Abroad

There was a neat combinative
finish to Gary's round eight
game: 

G. Kasparov-l. Rogers

Sic...
14 A Thirteen Year Old Abroad

ll c4!? 

White sets up a ‘Mujannah’
formation.  This pawn structure, 
dating from the 10th...
16 A Thirteen Year Old Abroad

30 $114 §g2! 31 367+ @g8 32
1!e8+ ®g7 33 ‘ge7+ E17 34
Ee5+ 1l! If6+ 35 E’x1’6+ ezxra 36
9.x...
/8 A Thirteen Year Old Abroad

35 §d3

35 Exa4 leads to the loss ofthe
exchange after 35  @d2+ 36
@e2 é)c3+ 37 é7xd2 5.Bxa...
20 A Thirteen Year Old Abroad

of White's “advantage“.  This
most natural move by the knight
unexpectedly leads into diffi...
22 Age Fourteen:  I
Round 3 from the same event: 

G. Kasparov-L. Zaid

Sicilian.  Najdorf B97
1 e4 c5 2 5Df3 d6 3 d4 ed 4...
24 Age Fourteen:  I

J. Arnason-G. Kasparov

Sicilian,  Scheveningen B85
1 e4 e5 2 QB 96 3 d4 cd 4 5Dxd4
Qfé 5 Q03 d6 6 9....
26 Minsk I978

score (l0-4).  Gary’s performance earned him the USSR title ofMaster of
Sport.  He over~fulfilled the requi...
28 Minsk I978

G. Kasparov-S. Begun
QGD,  Semi-Tarraseh D42
1d4d52e4e635De3 5Af64£'4]f3e5
5 cd 5Dxd5 6 e3 5z3c6 7 _@. d3 9...
5 Top League! 

AGE Otborochnii at Daugapils
15 The Otborochnii (Qualifying) Tournament stage
of the 46th USSR Championshi...
32 Top League! 

Black is cramped. 
26 fig] Eh7
After 26  5Ah6 there is already
the decisive 27 15Axg7l $xg7 28

gh+ etc. 
...
34 Top League! 

Razuvayev.  The need to battle to survive had the effect on Gary ofgiving
a natural rein to his talents a...
36 Top League! 

Ef3!'? ) 25  lDd7! 26 9.93 @c5 27
.9.xd4 ed 28 . @.d5 .9.e7 29 h4 Qdeé

(29  ixg5 30 hg 5Ade6 31 g6 fg
32...
6 Banja Luka — First Leg

AGE

international grandmasters. 

His

Minus even a FIDE rating Gary was given the
opportunity ...
40 Banja Luka — First Leg

G. Kasparov-D. Marovit': 
QGD Orthodox D6]
lc4 e62 5z1f3d53d4 Qf64 5Zte3
§. e7 5 Jigs 0-0 6 e3 ...
7 47th Championship

AGE
16 G. Kasparov appeared for the first time on a
FIDE rating list,  the 1.7.79 supplementary list....
44 47th Championship

Directly into the awaiting net! 
He had to play 28  $xg7 29
Zgl+ é7h7 30 f6 §g8. after which
31 Exh6...
46 47th Championship

§f8 26 fig] with an unstoppable . ¢.b3 E15 31 ®g2 a5

attack.  White also has a decisive 32 Exf7

att...
48 Skara Teams

9 .  . .  5£. c6
I0 9152 (I6
11 ‘AC3 Q66
I2 l34'. ’l

Better is 12 e3. e. g. 12  a6 13
9.e2 ‘£115 14 0-0 fi...
50 Skara Teams

created Black's best chance was 30
 iLg7 Jl H/ c7 ‘QXC7 32 EXC7
_lI. d4. although even here alter
33 Ell a...
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov   fighting chess - my games and career
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov fighting chess - my games and career

406 views

Published on

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

(Eche62) chess ebook libro scacchi echecs ajedrez schach garry kasparov fighting chess - my games and career

  1. 1. FIGHTING CHESS My Games and Career Gary Kasparov Translated by Eric Schiller Career and Editing by Robert G Wade B. T.Batsford Ltd, London
  2. 2. First published 1983 © G. I(asparov, R. G.Wade ISBN 0 71341984 9 (limp) Printed and bound in Great Britain by Biddles Ltd, Guildford and Kings Lynn for the publishers B. T.Batsford Ltd, 4 Fitzhardinge Street, London W1H OAH A BATSFORD CHESS BOOK Adviser: R. G.Wade O. B.E. Contents Photograph: Luzern 1982 iv Preface v Acknowledgements v Bibliography vi Symbols vi 1 In the beginning . . . I 2 A Thirteen Year Old Abroad II 3 Age Fourteen: I 21 4 Minsk 1978 25 5 Top League! 30 6 Banja Luka - First Leg 38 7 47th Championship 42 8 Skara Teams 47 9 Baku — Second Leg 51 10 Junior World Champion 56 11 Malta Olympiad 60 12 Encounters with Kzrrpov 03 13 Moscow Grandmasters 71 I4 Graz Teams 84 I5 Irirerpalix at Tilburg 92 16 Gold! 96 17 Super at Bugojno 119 18 Becoming a Candidate I26 19 Luzern: Soviet Triumph 130 Opponents‘ Index 137 Openings‘ Index I40 Photographs 1. Young Gary p.19 2. With trainers Nikitin (r) and Shakharov (1) at the 46th Championship p.37 3. At Baku Tournament p.50 4. Junior World Champion p.59 5. with Karpov, March 1981 p.69 6. What's Tal analysing? p.125 7. Playing Belyavsky during the Interzonal p.129 8. Playing Korchnoi with Belyavsky and Karpov anxiously looking on p.133 ERRATA Owing to an error by the printers the illustrations on pages I9 and I33 are transposed.
  3. 3. Preface . . .11 who/1' galaxy rifxlrarig. _v0uri_t; 'grzzndma. rIcr. r hay name to / heforz’. halh in I/1(’ USSR lUl(I(I,7l‘()(l(/ . . . my WEN’ Gary l'a. tp(Ir0i'h0/dx (lie gwalexl prr). 'pr*('I. r. . . (with a FIDE rating of 2690 on January lst I983 he has become the highest rated teenager in history ~ ml. ) . . . my opiiii/ m K(l. '[)Hl‘I)| ’ i on I'(lIlI(’ [(1 ui*hiz'virig (1 per/ i*i'I unilliiIrni()rii'(1ii. . iI, i‘le / I/<1’ (world champion I927-35, 37-45) .4Ii'/ <Iii'm"'. — Mikhail Botvinnik. world champion I948-57. 58-60, 61-63. Many regard his progress to the worltl title as inevitable. But . . . This book contains 32 games annotated by Gary Kasparov(pronnuneed Kas'«PA-rov). I annotated by Mikhail Botvinnik. 3 games with notes by line Schiller. 2 jointly by Gary and lirie. and ll games and positions chosen by the editor — total 64 games and 5 positions. II has all been built up from a 36 page booklet Rustin VII tli'4u'IxAi‘i'. Iiiilt/ inialivl/ '(Growing up in the Palace ol’ Chessplayersl issued by the Palace honotiring Yuri (iagarin (astronaut — ml. ) for Young Pioneers of Baku on January 21) l98l. Details of (jury's career and the backgroiind to his games have been inserted by the editor. Robert G. Wade Acknowledgements The author and editor gratefully acknowledge the help received in producing this book. This includes thanks to Eric Schiller and Raymond Keene for liaison with Gary, to B. T.Batsford Ltd. for liaison with VAAP, to the Soviet twice-monthly "64" and l-‘rits / gterdenbos‘(p. I 34) for photographs. to Jon Speelman for additional translation, to George Fificld Jnr. for cover design, to Hilary Thomas for typesetting. advice on layout and design and corrections at manu. ript and proof stages. to Leslie Smart for checking parts ofthe manuscript, to Paul Lamford for internal liaison, to Richard Sams for proofreading and to David Spanier for providing text for interview of Gary published in Spit'_t: el h‘ui'h in l98l.
  4. 4. Bibliography The editor acknowledges the usefulness of source material from the Soviet chess periodicals Shakrnaty of USSR. Shakmaty (Riga), Shakmatny Bulletin, Shakhmaty (Baku), 64 and Bulleten Tscntralnogo Shakhmatnogo Kluba USSR, from the British Chem Magazine, Deutsche Schachb/ filter, Srhaakbulletinen, from the twice-yearly C/ I853‘ Infarmator, from various tournament bulletins and from the 1981 Tilburg tournament book. Symbols + Check it i Slight advantage A 1 Clear advantage 4 r t + Winning advantage = Level position no Unclear position ! Good move ! ! Outstanding move ! ‘.’ Interesting move ‘I! Dubious move 1’ Weak move ‘)7 Blunder Corres Correspondence OL Olympiad 1Z lnterzonal 1. League Ch Championship l/ _~f Semi-final 1 In the beginning . . . 1963- Gary Kimovich KASPAROV was born on April I3, 1963 in Baku, where he still lives. Gary‘s father, Kim Moiseyevieh Wainshtein, an engineer by training, was a cultured and versatile man. He was particularly fond of music and enjoyed playing the violin. lt‘s understandable that he dabbled in chess: it is more of a surprise that his wife was also interested. When Gary had just turned six the family reached a decision to teach him music. It is interesting to ‘, /'~/ Finland Balm‘ Sm ponder what he would have | ’0li| "d Leningrad contributed to music had the decision been carried through. Would the vacuum in chess have been filled by another genius‘! Baku - capital of Azerbaidzhan - one . M°‘°°" of the Soviet republivr. lies 1700 km. (more than [000 miles) south-east of Moscow, beyond the Caucasus Mountains. With t‘t. r population more than a million, Baku is a poll on the shore: ofthe Caspian Sea noted as one ofthe most important oil extracting and refining centrer in the world; its history goes back to the 81/: century. It has one of the mildext climatar in the Soviet Union - above 0°C in January and b€1W€. €n 25-30° in July.
  5. 5. 2 In the beginning . . . That same evening of decision Gary‘s parents set up a position from the local newspaper column run by the old chess master. Suryen Abramian. Their little one, Garik (familiar form of Gary), did not raise his eyes from the board; after awaking next morning — at breakfast — Gary suggested a move to solve the position. This amazed the family; no one had taught him the game. His father, curious, tested him on the notation for the different squares! Such skill only called for a partial raising of the eyebrows. After all, Ciarik had learnt to read and to add up when very young. Wainshtein to Kasparov Gary's father, of Jewish background, died before he had reached forty when Gary was seven. Gary then lived together with his mother, Clara Shagenovna, and with her parents, who were of Armenian extraction. His mother, his maternal grandfather and grandmother were all called Kasparian. It was a natural sequel that Gary should adopt the Russian version of this surname when he legally could at the age of 12. When Gary was seven. Rostik Korsunsky, a boy in the seventh grade from a neighbouring apartment, took Gary to the chess circle of the Young Pioneers movement. (Korsunsky has since became one of Baku‘s chess masters. ) Chc. ‘. i in Azurlmidzhan It’I‘Vil()I'_l' [7¢‘l‘h(l[7.l drum hru'k to the (III! ¢w1Iury.4.I). . Clem lin/ xzr / >(’l|1‘(‘('fI (‘hers and 7}fl£’lI'}' are Ihcre in the /21!: cclrluljl‘. Mo: /om ("him /0()/ ' mo! in rlbrmz I/ re mnl-/9th Cenlury. 7/10 / VIalwz, ;runov hrnlhers, Vladimir uml Mlk/ rail. /mlh mu. rIcr', t‘unnz'cIz'r/ wilh Baku | l'(‘I‘(‘ mt/ /-knrzwn Ihruughnul Soviet ('/1é'. l.' in the 1920‘: and I 9303'. .r’aimi/ uys Hit’ ropuhlfruzli [mail of 15 (‘him , i*¢'Imu/ _ and :1 . pcz‘1aI 1u‘ir-P-monthly A’ page I’us'i'I’(1n / uIi, rzt1ai, m}ni4rna/ “Shakmuty" (S‘I(H'l(’r/ March I981). The Bulru Young Pnmrwti 1'/ zv. . rm‘/ U. . rIarIt*zl in I937, / mr prm/ urvr/11/mu! 10!) firxl c1ll('gm'_v [lIU)'('l‘. l' and 35 tuntlirlalo Ina. m'r. s (4: Elm _’2{)()). Surc2i Abra/ niml (I). 1910) was their z-urlicrl / car/ ing trainer‘ and rlrvc/ opcr it-lzilo their hm’: /‘nun /1 gradua/ cs In; /‘arc l'u. pr1rm' lI’A’I‘(' gI'anr/ niailcr Vlruliniimv Ba_qiruv (USSR E‘haWl[1f0Il. Yhifl ('0Iflfl€‘[IIOV rmm_i‘ Ilmcv) zmrl Ta/ iunu ZuIuIm'. rlra_m (nrommfli | |‘1lr/ {I cht1mpion. hip mndizialc). In the beginning. . . 3 The Baku Young Pioneers At the Young Pioneers, Gary's first trainer was Oleg I. Privorotsky, who already after just a few lessons was remarking “I do not know whether other cities have similar beginners; there certainly is no one like him in Baku. “ Garik played, according to trainer Privorotsky, rather weakly, but by his exceptional memory differed from other novices. He learnt by heart the data (moves. results, scores) of world championship matches. And when the instructors began to dissect positions and studies the boy became cut off from his surroundings and totally involved in the unravelling of the complexities. Impressive finishes interested Garik; it was not long before he came under the spell of the dynamic games of Alexander Alekhine (World Champion 1927-35, 1937-45) which were to have a longlastinginfluence on him. Young Gary rapidly climbed the ladder of chess performances, from fourth category (c. l450 rating), to third category (c.1600), to second category (c.1800). lt was thought worthy of a paragraph in both local and All-Union newspapers when as 9 year old and a first category player (c.2000 rating) Garik reached the final of the Baku lightning championship. At the end of l973 a Scheveningen system tournament was held in Baku of DYuS chess trainers versus first category players. Gary fulfilled the norm for a USSR candidate master (c.2150). And the specialists were beginning to size up Gary. Amongst the trainers‘ team was A. Shakharov who would become one of Gary's instructors in Botvinnik's school. Botvinnik’s School Indeed already in June 1973 Gary had played in his first serious All- Union event, the Youth Team Championship at Vilnius. In the final tournament the ten-year—old meeting candidate masters did not lose, despite all his opponents being older. Among the attending trainers was Aleksandr Nikitin who paid particular attention to Gary‘s play. The result — a month later the boy was invited to a session of Botvinnik’s School. Mikhail Botvinnik had been world champion I948-1957. l958—l960. 1961-1963 and was certainly the USSR‘s greatest player. His school. begun in 1963, had included talented pupils like Anatoly Karpov; all parts of the country were represented. The main work of the school was conducted by correspondence. The pupils met their teacher in short sessions two or three times a year. normally during school vacations. A fresh, individually-tailored tough assignment of work would be allocated at the end of each session.
  6. 6. 4 In the beginning . . . Kasparov said “In 1973 when I was still a boy whojust liked playing chess Mikhail Moiseyevich (Botvinnik) invited me to join his school. There is no price I could name forthe things I got from the course during the next five years. He does not . . . impose his views on his pupils. “Botvinnik confirmed in me the view that Alekhine’s chess was my sort also. When I became Soviet Junior Champion in 1977 Mikhail Moiseyevich congratulated me. Then he suggested that I go through my winning games; I was severely criticised at some points in them. But he made me happy with the remark that the quality of my play gave him great hopes for me. " Botvinnik wrote “It was clear from the beginning that he stood out among other boys because of his ability to calculate variations very skilfully andfor many moves ahead. But Gary was a very excitable boy. I had to insist he think before making a move. I also used to say: ‘Gary. there is a danger that you will become a new Larsen or Taimano v‘. Even at It mature age these esteemed grandmasters sometimes make a move first and then think. “ Baku Young Pioneers 1973-74 Baku‘s team of Young Pioneers (six boys, one girl) qualified for the All-Union final of the Komsomolskaya Pravda event by winning one of the zonal events at Kiev during the 1973-74 New Year break. Baku scored 27-8, ahead of Kiev 22'/3, Zaporozhye l9, Tashkent l8, Dnyepropyetrovsk 11 and Stavropol 7'/ ;. For their team both Rostik Korsunsky and Gary Wainshtein won all five games. G. Wainshteln-V. Vasilyenko (Dnyepropyetro vsk) French C03 1e4 e6 2 d4 d5 3 @112 lDc6 4 5M3 5i}h6 5 95 T6 6 .9.b5! 9.d7 7 flxcé . fi.xc6 8 -‘ab3 3M7 9 JU4 f5 10 h4 3.27]! Ud2 b612e3 fi. b7 I3 . Qe3 3M 14 lac] £26 15 fih3 $11516 lflez ‘!9xe2+ I7 ‘Qxe2 . Qxe2 18 ‘éxez 0-0-0 19 Qgs ibxgs 20 hg Edffl 21 g3 g6 22 Elm §f7 23 Eahl fig7 24 $3 %d7 25 g4 fg+ § ‘ * . ‘ § 90 _ : , ’ § § V ; ‘ $? Q’ . ‘ s V is V A 26 @xg4 sex 27 b4 a6 28 a4 ®d7 29 b5 as? ! (1) 30 c4! dc 31 Eel fies? 32 Exes! Ads 33 an Eee7 34 em Egf7 35 Beds 3g7 36 d5 ed+ 37 ®xd5 fies 38 e6+ écs 39 9.d4 Eggs 40 Exh7 1:0 Not a badly played positional game for a 10 year old! In the beginning . . . 5 “Komsom0lskaya Pravda” Final 1974 Ten year old Gary Wainshtein was a member of Baku‘s Young Pioneers‘ team, headed by grandmaster Bagirov, competing with young pioneer teams from Moscow, Leningrad, Cheliabinsk, Riga and Chernovtsy in Moscow at the end of March 1974 for the Komsomolskaya Pravda prize. Each team of six boys and one girl had its grandmaster-trainer who ‘ played a clock simultaneous against each of the other teams. Gary beat Averbakh, drew with Kuzmin and lost to Tal (a truly memorable experience) to Taimanov and to Polugayevsky. A special report on Gary read “His basic chess failing is over- exuberance leading to his reaching aver-optimistic asst'ssments hastily. This results in mistakes which are not always sorted out due to his fat: /Iy recording. But he is stilljust a child; he n‘ill. su('cee(Iin beearning more solid without any forcing. Gary should have an experienced chess teacher (or even better, grandmasters) who. one must hope. will care/ it/ ly sort out all his games. " USSR Junior Championship 1975 Easily the youngest of the 42 competitors, which included 23 candidate masters, to participate in the USSR Junior Championship at Vilnius (Jan. 1975) was I I year old “Garik“ Wainshtein. He won his first three games, thus played most ofthe leaders, and finished a meritorious 7th. The winner, Evgeni Vladimirov from Alma—Ata, was 17 years old. Top ten in the 9 rounds Swiss event: /2_J4567890Rest 1 E. Vladimirov it '/3 I 1 '/2 I 1 2‘/2 7'/2 2 E. Kengis ‘/2 * 1 ‘/2 I '/ ~ '/ .~ ‘/2 2 6'/2 3 V. Sokolov 0 ‘Ir 1 0 5‘/ .= 6V: 4 L. Yurtayev 0 '/1 0 it 1 I '/2 1 2 6 5 A. Yermo| insky 0 0 * I ‘/2 4‘/2 6 6 R. Gahdrakhmanov 0 it I 5 6 7 G. Wainshtein ‘/2 ‘/2 l 0 0 ‘k ‘/ ~ 3 5'/2 8 S. Dvoiris 0 '/ w ‘/2 0 '/ ~ * 4 5'/2 9 S. Pekker 0 0 * 5‘/2 5'/ z 10 E. Magerramnv ‘/5 ‘/2 * 4‘/2 5'/2 The following game from thejunior championship was included in the first western press report on Gary, by l. conard Barden in The Guardian. February 24. 1975. We quote:
  7. 7. 6 In the beginning . . . Whatever happens to the world title in 1975, most experts predict that Karpav will be Fischerlr successor- this year, in I978, or in 198]. But who will be world champion after Kttrpov? . . . in my opinion there is a very elear favourite for world champion in 1990. He is ll-year-old Gary Wainshtein from Baku. coached by IM Bagirov. youngest player in the USSR junior championship and younger! candidate master since Karpov. In English rating terms. Wainshtein is 11 l90player (2120 on the 15/0 scale) and improving fast. E. Einoris-G. Wainshtein Sicilian B59 1 e4 c5 2 5238 5Dc6 3 :14 ed 4 Qxd4 [M6 5 5Dc3 d6 6 R62 e5 Now Gary prefers to push the e-pawn just one square forward. 7 ®b3 fle7 8 0-0 0-0 9 f4 a5! Reacting to White's seldom seen, and dubious, move in the theoretically approved manner. 10 a4 5z)b4 11 £13 9.d7!'. ’ The manoeuvre 9.c8-d7-c6 is employed by Gary frequently in the Scheveningen. Here it repre- sents a theoretical novelty. Black also stands well after ll £86. 12 $hl 9.c6! 13 ‘Ads? A rather obvious blunder, simply giving up a pawn for no reason. Having already ceded the d5 square to Black‘s pieces, White has nothing better than 13 gel (If 13 fe de 14 . Qg5 Exdl 1) 13 Eac8 with a tough fight ahead, where the chances are roughly equal. 13 . . . .Q. xd5 14 ed :24 15 9.92 é1bxd5 16 g4 5Dc7 17 g5 45Dfe8 White's aggressive posturing does not intimidate the young Baku lad who simply surrounds his monarch with protection and concentrates on using that beautiful passed pawn on e4. 18 id2 Q26 19 h4 f5! The white king has borrowed the Emperor's new clothes, and if he captures on f6, his nakedness will become obvious e. g.: 20 gt‘? .9.xf6 21 h5 flxbl 22 Ebl l! ’h4+ 23 ®g2 Ea} T as 24 f5 is met by 24 e3! 25 9.xe3 E'c4+ 26 EB §xf5 W. 20 9.93 d5 21 (:4 FZSC7 21 de 22 . Qxc4 gives White excellent prospects. 22 ibé Hdfil 23 c5 Now the pressure on the Black centre has been released, and the connected passed pawns are free to roll. That White can regain material equality is irrelevant. 23 . . . EH7 24 5Dxa5 9.xc5 25 . Qxe7 £Dxc7 26 5Dxb7 £27! Sitting on a splendid diagonal besides blockading the a-pawn. 27 a5 d4 28 fi. c4+ arts 29 a6 d3 30 b4? There is no possible role for this tortoise on the queenside. A last desperate idea is 30 §a5!? 30 . . . E’d4 31 M3 l§’e3 32 Ua2 Eacsl Setting up a pretty exchange sacrifice. 33 Qdé Ecd8 34 5Db7 (2) n / 34 . . . d2! Intending 35 Eh3 mate. 35 @h2 Ed3l Fleeing one attacker, the brave rook jumps right into the arms of another! 36 . Qxd3 Wxd3 37 ‘ll'a3 ‘il7xa3 38 §xa3 e3 39 Eaal e2 40 Eh] 31:8 41 5Dd6 elfl 42 5Dxe8 Ef2+ 0:] In the beginning . . . 7 A wild draw from this junior championship: S. Dvoiris-G. Wainshtein Sicilian B89 1 e4 c5 2 QB é1c6 3 d4 cd4 «'»Dxd4 5M6 5 @c3 d6 6 . @.c4 c6 7 _Qe3 9&7 Ee2 a6 9 0-0-0 EH10 fi. b3 0-0 11 g4 5Dxd4 12 §xd4 b5 13 g5 ~5Dd7 14 ‘Qh5 Ed8 15 @dSl? ECO gives 15 e5 and 15 fig]. 15 ¢Dd5 was analysed by Aleksandr Nikitin in 1968. 15 . . . ed 16 . Qxd5 Q95 17 f4 If 17 . Qxa8 9.g4 18 flhrt .9.f3 gives Black the better chances. 17 . . . g6 17 9.g4 18 l! ]h4 Eac8 19 c3 fi. f3 would have been possible. 18 EH4 @313 (3) , / 4 1% “a x % ¢/ /// ,,a 19 9.Xf7+ ®g7 20 §l'h6+ ®xf7 21 ¥‘§’xh7+ $e8 22 ‘ll§’xg6+ <$d7 23 Wf5+ $e8 24 lLYg6+ $117 25 Ed3 36:4 26 Ehdl R117 27 WI17 3x24 28 Exd6+ $98 29 Q’h8+ flffi 30 §xd8+ Exd8 31 §xd8+ A V §F s JG s
  8. 8. 8 In Ihe beginning . . . ®xd8 32 ‘Qxf8+ @117 33 flg7+ @138 34 gh8+ Q17 35 gf6+ figs 36 gd8+ QII7 37 gd7+ $36 38 §e8+ $75 39 Qd7+ Eefi 40 ‘Qxe6+ ®xe6 41 b3 ¢Dxli2 42 c4 be 43 be 5Dg4 44 EC” $13 45 a3 ill] '/2-% Baku “City Cup” This knock-out micro-match (of two games with ties resolved by 5-minute blitz games) compet- ition brought together l28 master, candidate-master and first category players in autumn, 1975. The final — a keen struggle — ended in a victory for the 6th class pupil over the chess master. Here is the decisive game: 0.Pav| en|1o-G. Kasparov King’s Indian E71 1 d4 ¢Df6 2 c4 g63 QC3 _Qg74e4 d6 5 h3 0-0 6 . Qe3 e5 7 d5 5flh5 8 .9.e2 fS! '.’ 9 9.xh5 gli 10 ‘Qxh5 f4 11 fldl Qd7 12 0-0-0 @f6 13 E62 H2314 5Df3 c515 ®h1a616 g4 . id7 17 @114 I15 18 5Df5 b4 19_5Dxd6 Ue7 20 5Jf5 fi. xf5 21 el? bc 22 .9.xc3 5Ad7 23 as an 24 rs nabs 25 ads (4) , 2 7 %5%. W / fly '7/ fl%7%%%V% 2 /2 /2 %§ 25 QIJ6! 26 fihdl 51)xd5?! 27 §Xd5 94! 28 f6 . QXf6 29 E15 ixc3 30 Exf7 fixh2+ 31 Hxbl 9.xb2 32 Ee7 ef 33 fiel f2 34 EH fld4 0:1 The violent flare-ups from the l(ing‘s Indian Defence are a Kasparov characteristic. Issue 42/1975 of the weekly 64 reporting the above event wrote that Kasparov, previously known as Wainshtein, now bore the maternal family name. Grandmaster/ Young Pioneers 1975 The Kornsomolxkaya Pravda Grandmaster/ Young Pioneers event was staged in Leningrad, November 1975. Gary drew with grandmasters Viktor Korchnoi (l978 and 1981 challenger), Lev Polugayevsky and Gennady Kuzmin, beat master Boris Katalimov and lost to ex-world champion Vassily Smyslov and world champion Anatoly Karpov. Detailed results: Moscow 54 (Smyslov 38 from 42 — 6 clock simuls. on 7 boards — plus his team's 16 points notched from other grandmasters), Leningrad 49'/2 (Korchnoi 37% plus I2), Kuibishyev 42 (Polugayevsky 37 plus 5), Cheliabinsk 42 (Karpov 37 plus 5), Baku 39 (Bagirov 33'/3 plus 5'/ ;), Voroshilovgrad 371/; (Kuzmin 32 plus 5'/ ;) and Alma-Ata 30 (Katalimov 281/; plus I%). This was the first crossing ofrwards between Karpov, then the newly crowned world champion. and Gary Kasparov. The game: A'. Karpov-G. Kasparov Sicilian 392 1 e4 c5 2 -an as 3 d4 cd 4 £axd4 %f6 S 5303 1166 R62 e5 7 @b3 $.87 23 , fi.g5 nets 9 14 efl0 mm acts 11 0-0 0-0 12 em b5 13 ms 5De5 14 -‘»2)d4 flc4 15 Efl b4 16 5Dd5 Qxd5 17 ed flffi 18 Edl Ubfi 19 fie} EC7 20 £94 Efe8 21 flgl g6 22 a3 a5 23 ah ab 24 Ex-a8 Exa8 25 b3 9.26 26 élcé ‘Exec’: 27 do (5) 2 2 Q 2:3,/ U/, ,/V 1%8%yflA% V y y / /%7/ W %a; %afi g/ / / . 27 . . . fies? "I had such a good position! " cried the young Baku boy after the game. Black actually did have the initiative, and after 27 . ¢.b5 White would have had an uphill battle to draw. Now the picture is radically altered. 28 £115 RC3 29 En Eel 30 ‘QB 9.d4 31 fi. xl'7+ $117 32 EC4! Kasparov had not seen this ‘shot‘ beforehand. The double threat — male on f8 and the capture of the bishop at 2:6. forces Black to go in for a losing endgame. 32 . . . ExgI+ 33 Sfixgl .9.xf2+ 34 ®xf2 9.xc4 35 In the beginning. . . 9 be $117+ 36 $92 EH14 37 Eds yrs 38 EM b3 39 ch $112+ 40 an gen 41 Eei $414+ 42 egi $114+ 43 em BM 44 l¥e7+ @h6 45 l! 'f8+ 1:0 Here is Kasparov's draw with Polugayevsky: G. Kasparov-L. Polugayevsky Sicilian A08 1 e4 c5 2 5Df3 e6 3 d3 d5 4 Qbdl lflcfi 5 g3 9.116 6 igl 5Z]ge7 7 0-0 0-0 8 Eel RC7 9 ‘H22 (9 a3! intending C3, b4) 9 b6 10 h4 5AM 11 Glfl (ll fldl intending a3 is more patient. ) ll de 12 E’xe4'. ’!! Qxcl (l2 Eb8!) 13 32138 Qxal 14 (A63! 5Df5! 15 Qxf5 ef 16 9.g5 I'617 Exal lg 18 5z3xg5 g619 Eel! hfi (6) 4, 2 Z , yvx 2M%a%%W 8% %y/ % % 2|) HC6! EM! (If 20 hg 2| wxg5+ ens 22 ‘ll’{h6+ egg 23 . Q.d5+ lExdS 24 ‘Ego-l ®h8 25 fie7 wins. ) 21 ‘B96 Hxcfi 22 ixcé flxeb (22 El7 is met by 23 .9.d5‘ L! .g. 23 ®h8 24 Q14.) 23 Exefi ®g7 24 £28 f4!'. ’ 25 g4 (Gary preferred to strengthen his position rather than to win a pawn by 25 fixg6+ $h7 26 §c6.) 25 . Q.d8! '/3:‘/3.
  9. 9. 10 In the beginning. . . Botvinnik, commenting at the time on this game. boldly asserted “In the hand: of thir young man [fer the future of chess. " USSR Junior Champion 1976 '/3-point better on the Buckholz tie—breaking system brought Gary the USSR junior title at the beginning of I976. 38 youths under 18 contested the 9-round Swiss system event held in Tbilisi. Details: I. G. Kasparov 7-2 (includes draws with E. Lanka, E. Sturua and P. Gabdral<hmanov published); 2. E. Sturua 7; 3. P. Gabdrakhmanov 6'/9; 4. A. Vasilyenko 6'/3; 5-8. E. Lanka, S. Lputyan, A. Harit0nov and L. Yurtz1yev 6; 9. A. Yusup0v 5'/ ;. Maya Chiburdanidze, women's world champion- to-be, won the girls‘ championshipheld alongside, G. Kasparov—M. Myerkulov Sicilian B36 1 e4 c5 2 5z]f3 5zc6 3d4cd4 6}xd4 g6 5 c4 5Af6 6 581:3 £Dxd4 7 E’xd4 d6 8 ig5 .9417 9 ‘l¥ld2 0-0 10 . Qe2 9.136 11 Eel B21512 f3 arcs 13 113 a614a4 $71815 h4h516 id] _Qd7l7g4!'. '(7) w . V§ . ‘ I-s %% & 1, /2. 17 li5(l7 hgl? ) 18gh gh(l8.. . 51)xh5 l9 9.xe7l)19 Rho _@. c6 20 ab 21 ch fixbs 22 . Q.xg7+ $xg7 23 Egll EH8 24 figs fie5 25 Exes de 26 5311115 1§’Xh5 27 $116+ @g8 28 Hg5+ ems 29 flxc5 EH3 30 fie. ‘ Hd731 e5 5208 32 ‘EC6 E727 33 Ec5 5Dg7 34 9.62 4106 35 @404 $18 36 We? » $511+ 37 s$e2 Eh! 38 Eh6+ égs 39 l§’gS+ dyhs 40 ¥xhS+ @g8 41 Wg4+ @118 42 86 f6 43 §h5+ 1:0 L. Yurtayev-G. Kasparov Sicilian B22 le4 c5 2c3 t'z]f6 305 5Dd54d4cdS fled HC7 6 E¥e2 Qjbé 7 . Qh3 d5 (7 d3l? ) 8 ed ‘Ends 9 &f3 I’¢c6 10 0-0 d3 11 ‘E123 5Aa5 12 581:3 a6 13 51195 5Axb3 14 ab .9.f5 15 Qae-1 5Dxc4 16 I'43xc4 He6 (8) w‘ '7 l7 1!’g3 Hgé 18 .9.f4 1§’xg3 I9 hg Hes 20 52335 b5 21 b4 f6 22 QJh3 e5 23 fi. e3 Ecé 24 f4 ficfi 25 5z]c5 fixc5 26 he _Q. g4 27 fe fe 28 Ef2 h6 29 éfl Q07 30 $01 §ig6 31 ‘éJd2 .9.c8 32 t¥Jxd3 Exg3 33 fie] 9.h7 34 $Sc2 Exg2 35 Exgl . @.xg2 36 .0.d4 EH7 37 3x95 EN 38 ‘S? h3 a5 39 e4 Ed8 40 _@. e3 b4 41 ms. V2?g6 42 En RC6 43 E112 Eixdl 44 . Qxd2 V$f5 0:1 2 A Thirteen Year Old Abroad AGE ‘ 13 World Cadet Cup Nyeplokho — not bad! 'l'hat‘s how the Russian fortnightly. 64, greeted Gary's performance in the 3rd World Cup for Cadets, juniors born after 3l. 12.58, staged at Wattignes(near Lille in France), July 5-13. I976. Gary shared third place score in the 9 round, 32 player Swiss event. No junior as young as thirteen has represented the Soviet Union at sport abroad in a “Western“ country before Gary Kasparov. World Cup for Cade/ .1’. Walligniex 4-13,7,/976 I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 Rm! 1 N. Grinberg ISL * l ‘/3 I 1/; 1 1 2'/3 7'/1 2 M. Chand| er NZD 0 it I '/3 l l '/3 3 7 3 l. Rogers AUS 1/; 0 it '/ a 0 1 1 1 2 6 4 M. Petursson ISD 0 ‘/ a V; ‘k 1 0 4 6 5 G. Kasparov URS '/3 0 1 t 0 l/ ~ 4 6 6 A. Groszpeter HUN 1!: 0 0 6 6 7 J. vanderWiel NDL 0 0 1 1 ‘I: 0 '/3 2 5‘/ ; 8 l’. Nikolie . lUG 0 0 l I it 0 3 5'/ ; 9 A. Chia SIN 0 it 5'/ ; 5'/2 10 D. CramIing SVE 0 '/3 0 1 '/ ~ '/3 1 * 1% 5 11-12: G. Fran7.0ni (SWZ), /. Sélc'-gny (l-'RA) 5; I3-l5: . l.l‘. l.e_| cunc (FR/ ), O. Foisor (ROM). S, Semkov (BLG) 4; 16-20: 1.. /trnold (FRO). l). [)unne(lRl, ). l. Morovic (Clll), .l. Weber (LUX), D. Roos (FR/ ) 4; 2|—23: T. Salen (NOR), J. Hodgson (ENG). l). Walker (SCO) 3; 24-25: A. Sendur (TRK). .l. Waters (WLS) 3'. 26-27: A. Yahia (JRD), A. (i. 'illL‘ (BEL) 2; 28: / .Wundcrl (051) l. Kasparov beat Dunne, D. Roos, Sendur and Gallo.
  10. 10. I2 A Thirteen Year Old Abroad There was a neat combinative finish to Gary's round eight game: G. Kasparov-l. Rogers Sicilian B33 1e4cS2@l'3 5Dc63d4cd4 5axd4 Qffi 5 5Ac3 e5 6 Qdb5 d6 7 9.g5 a6 8 51323 . Q.e6 (8 b5!? - Sveshnikov Variation) 9 QJC4 get} 10 @193 9.%7l1.¢. xt'6 flxfé 12 9x4 l)—0(l2 _@_g5 13 fix: -.6 fe 14 gg4 5Dd4 led to a protracted struggle in Rohde-Dan Cramling, World Junior Ch 1977.) 13 . Qb3 Qd4 14 0-0 fig5 I5 5Dcd5 t'41xb3 16 ab g6 17 éhl .9.h6 18 Ed3 f5 19 efgf20 f4 $h8 21 Zadl l%’h4 22 ‘§e2 el‘ 23 that . Q.f7 24 fld3 . fi.h5 25 5Dxd6 flxdl 26 I5Axc8 9.h5 27 @ce7 f3 28 gf em (9) 2/9, ”/ %®/ /. 1 ”/ /a . 2% e 29 Q“! Hh4 (If 29 _Qxf4 30 Wd4+) 30 Wd4+ (Intending 31 5i1g6+ to win the black queen. ) 30 ‘EH6 31 QXT6-l Exfé 32 41xh5 EI7 33 QdS f4 34 Eel l-0 1976 Games Gary's reply to Lputian‘s Samisch King's Indian, from the Caucasus Youth Games held at Tbilisi, is an inspiring example of Black‘s counterattacking and combinative possibilities: S. Lputian-G. Kasparov King’s Indian, Samisch E83 I d4 QT6 2 c4 g6 3 531:3 .9.g74e4 d6 5 f3 @c6 6 . ¢.e3 a6 7 Bd2 §l>8 8 Eb] 0-0 9 b4 White’s move promises both an interesting and complex struggle. White usually plays 9 51]ge2, strengthening the central point d4, and only then initiating operations on the queenside. By playing 9 b4 here, White actually provokes Black‘s reply and the following sacrifice of a pawn. 9 . . . e5! 10 d5 5Dd4 ll Qge2 c5 12 dc be! 13 5z]xd4 ed 14 . @.xd4 fie8! l4 c5 15 be 5Dxe4 l6 fe ‘Hh4+ appears quite tempting, but after 17 édll §xbl+ I8 Qxbl Hxe4 l9 . Qxg7 ! Vxbl+ 20 ‘Mel _Qg4+ 21 ®d2 W! xcl+ 22 t&xcl ‘37xg7 23 cd Ed8 24 c5 ECS 25 ixafi Exc5+ 26 $b2 the complications are concluded and an endgame reached which is favourable for White. 14 Hell! poses White a more difficult problem: to find the correct path in the minefield‘ Perhaps the proper decision was 15 .9.d3. 15 ie2 c5! 16 be 5Bxe4 Brings out Ll possible weak- ness of White's 8 Ebl. 9 b4 plant 17 fe l. !!h4+ 18 g3 On 18 El? there would have followed 18 9.xc3 19 9.xh4 Exbl+ 28 @f2 9.xd2 21 flxbl dc with a serious advantage for Black. 18 . . A fixbl+ 19 fin (I0) / //, .9./ ,E/ %/ 7/ / A’ 4 at S ''_§ 19 . . . Eb2!! 20 gh §xd2 21 . Qxg7 V$xg7 22 ®e3 id 23 @113 Exc3+! 24 @xc3 dc The combination has given Black a technically won endgame, despite the material equality. 25 fi. d3 .9.b7 26 Eel Ees 26 f5 27 e5 _@. e4 28 . fi.xe4 §xe5 would also have sufficed. 27 a4 f5 28 EM .9.xe4 29 fibfi f4 30 fixaé f3 31 ill . Qf5 32 3217+ @h6 33 ®d2 f2 34 . @.e2 9.g4 35 3413 fie] 36 317 . @.f5 37 a5 9.xd3 38 Exfl El‘! 0-] Oleg Romanishin, Ukrainian grandmaster, guest of honour at the Komsomalskaya Pravda zonal event at Baku, early November 1976, played a clock simultaneous against 16 of the participating A Thirteen Year Old Abroad 13 juniors. He lost two games, both to candidate masters. Here is one: O. Romanishin-G. Kasparov Bird‘s Opening A03 I {-4 d5 Garik‘s dislike of the 1 e4 e5 openings discourages him from employing the From Gambit (l e5l? ) as White can then take the opportunity to transpose to the King‘s Gambit with 2 e4. 2 QB 5Df6 3 e3 . Qg4 4 b3 A Nimzowitsch-Larsen type attack. 4 . . . Qbd7 5 . Qh2 c6 6 flez El! c7 7 0-0 . Qxf3l? Black eliminates his ‘enemy number 1’ before it reaches an aggressive post at e5. 8 9.xl‘3 e5! The passive 8 e6 would allow d3, 511bd2, e4. Kasparov. even at the age of 12 displays that obsession with the centre which has become such a characteristic of his later games. 9 d3 After 9 fe 5flxe5 Black has a very comfortable game. but the c-pawn cannot be allowed to advance with impunity. 9 . . . idé 10 g3 0-0-0! Black plays boldly, inspired by White's insipid opening play. 10 0-0 would have given him a fully equal. but much less interesting, game.
  11. 11. 14 A Thirteen Year Old Abroad ll c4!? White sets up a ‘Mujannah’ formation. This pawn structure, dating from the 10th century, is not popular, but was occasionally employed by Staunton and Nimzo» witsch. The bolstered c- and f-pawns are placed to try to contain the opponent’s advance in the centre. 11 . . . dc 12 be After 12 dc? abs! intending ef, Black is in a good position to try to win in under 20 moves, e. g. l3 fe Exe3+ l4 Eh] (l4 §f2? $.05!) l4 -5Dxe5 15 _Qg2 @e4! 12 . . . h5! 13 ‘Ed h4 14 ®c3 hg 15 hg ef 16 ef (ll) 16 gf §de8!‘. ’ l7 Eael may have been no worse, but Black can still employ the theme he demonstrates in the game. I '/ V/ /’/ /, Q 7 Ea: I6 . . . g5!! A brilliant conception, not because of the obvious l7 fg . ¢.xg3, where Black has an over- whelming attack, but because he boldly opens up the long diagonal of White's bishop at b2. The sheer Chutzpah is also quite impressive. 17 QM! Has Garik missed something? 17 . . . 113x94! 18 de On 18 _Qxh8 @xg3 is crushing, while 18 _¢. xe4 Ehg8 is still very unpleasant. I8 . . . Ehg8 19 e5 9.c5+ 20 @g2 gf 21 g4 axes Z2 ¥f5+ ‘$117! 23 §xd7+ 23 E’xe5 would have allowed mate after 23 §xg4+! Now White has no compensation for his material deficit. 23 . . . @xd7 24 ®h3 5z)b6 25 R16 Ed3 26 Eacl 13)d7 27 ial f5 28 QM 9.e7+ 29 %h5 Eg5+ 0-] not waiting for the finish 30 ®h6 fid6+ 3] s$li7 <'2)f8+ 32 éthél Eho mate. (Notes by E. Schiller) 1977 USSR Junior Championship Gary Kasparov crushingly won the USSR Junior Championship at Riga in January I977 as the following part table of the 9 round, 36 player, Swiss event shows: 1 2 1 G. Kasparov t 2 A. Cliernln ~k 3 L. Eolyan 0 4 Z. Lanka 0 l 5 B. Taborov ‘/3 6 A. Yusupov 0 1/; 7 R. Gabdrakhmanov 0 8 V. Kuporosov '/3 9 Y. Pigusov 0 10 Z. Sturua 0 “x°» ~w 0 A Thirteen Year Old Abroad I5 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 Rex! 1 I l 1 4% 8|/2 0 ‘/2 ‘/2 1 '/2 4 61/; 1 '/2 0 1 3'/ ; 6 * ‘/2 41/2 6 * 1 '/2 3'/2 6 ‘A’ '2 1 3 6 ‘/2 * ’/2 I 3'/2 5% ‘/2 0 ‘/2 it 0 4 5'/ ; ‘/2 0 if 5 51/1 0 1 * 4'/ g 5'/1 Kasparov beat L. Gitsin (3) in round I, V. Romanchyenko (4'/ ;) in 2, E. Kengis (5) in 6 and drew with I. Yefimov (4’/3) in round 3. From round 4: L. EoIyan-G. Kasparov Caro-Kann B18 1 c4 c6 Garik frequently adopts vari- ations from the opening repertoire of his trainer, Botvinnik. who used the Caro Kann so effectively in his l958 world championship match with Smyslov and his 1961 match with Tal. 2 d4 d5 3 QC} de 4 €Dxe4 9.f5 5 5flg3 flgfi 6 . Qc4 e6 7 iblez 5M6 8 0-0 . @.d6 9 f4 ‘HM! A Boleslavsky idea. Instead Keres-Golombek, Moscow 1956, went 9 H67 10 f5! ef ll l9xf5 . &xh2+? 12 ®hl 0-0 13 g3! 9.xf5 14 E_xf5 . ¢.xg3 l5 Exf6! clearly winning. 10 Eh] Not 10 f5?! ef ll id3 5Ae4!. After 10 id} 9.xd3 ll ‘§’xd3 gt’) equalises. 10 . . . h5! 115 el' 12 QM ixf4 13 Exf4 M! I4 921+ em 15 taez h3 16 EH4 I'lg+ 17 $xg2 . Qh5 18 5AM @416 [9 Qxhi 5Dxh5 20 Wdl g6 21 9.g5 ®g7 22 d5! f6 23 HKI4 c5 24 Heft b5 25 Exh5 §xh5 26 Exf6+ é7h7 27 fle2 (12) as-Z .0 V 27 . . . Eff}! 28 V: ¥xt‘8 If 28 V¥Ie7+ E17 29 ‘gxd7 Exg5+! 28 . . . ‘§xd5+ 29 é7g3? White wilts under the constant pressure to maintain the cut and thrust. 29 ®l"2 gives good drawing chances, eg. 29 §Xg5 30 Wc7+ or 29 Exh2+ 30 ®el while 29 Hd4+ 30 £63 iIxh2+ 31 figl is unclear. 29 . . . §xg5+
  12. 12. 16 A Thirteen Year Old Abroad 30 $114 §g2! 31 367+ @g8 32 1!e8+ ®g7 33 ‘ge7+ E17 34 Ee5+ 1l! If6+ 35 E’x1’6+ ezxra 36 9.xh5 QC7 37‘.9.d3 @d5! 38 311 e4! 39 . @.xc4 5Zte3 40 ®h3 g5! 41 Eel g4+ 0:]. From round 5: G. Kasparov-E. Pigusnv QGD, Exchange D36 1 d4 d5 2 QB tBf63c4e64 5Dc3 5Dhd7 5 ed ed 6 flg5 .9137 7e3 e6 8 9.d3 0-0 9 Wc2 §e8 10 0-0 Q18 11 Eae] (Reminiscent of Botvinnik! ) 11 Qg6 (11 4)e4!) 12 5Ae5l 51)d7 13 £. xe7 ¥xe7 14 f4 -’»Dd1‘8 15 e4! 5Jxe516fe . ¢_e6 17 ed .9.xd5 18 5flxd5 ed 19 9.15 ‘§’b4 20 Ed] h6 21 E12 Ee7 22 Ed3! fic7 23 EM 3137?! (Better to keep pressure on d4 by 23 Earl. ) 24 fig3 Qefi 25 Qefi é7h8 26 1:3 @114 27 Eg4! Exhz 28 $h2 ‘MM 29 . @.d3 @137 (I3) . . 2% /2% W ’/ /. ’/ %fi’/ / 30 Ef61 (threatening 31 Uxh6+) 30 figs 31 fixgs hg (lf3l gf 32 Eh5) 32 ‘§xg5l ®g8 33 EM! ‘$213 34 H3! g6 35 ixgé ‘€xf3 36 Eh7+! ®f8 37 gl" 1:0 / From round 6: E. Lanka-G. Kasparov Caro-Kann B19 1 e4 e6 2 d4 d5 3 ‘Bell de 4 ~’4)xe4 .9.f5 5 5Dg3 .9.g6 6 h4 h6 7 513B @117 8 h5 _@. h7 9 9.113 §. xd3 10 Bxd3 e6 11 £112 5Dgf6 12 Be2 Ed 13 e4 . €i. d6 14 5315 This position is often met in tournament praxis. Black cannot achieve equality easily if he chooses 14 0-0-0 15 5Axd6+ ‘§xd6 16 9.215 fide8 17 Qe5 B67 18 f4. 1n the 8th game of the 1974 match between Spassky and Karpov in Leningrad, 14 _Qf4 was played and after 15 . @.xf4 1¥xf4 16 ®e3 Ec717 0-0-0 b518 cb ch19 ébl 0-0 20 g4 5De4 21 Zhgl -9)g5 22 5Dxg5 hg Black managed to survive after great hardship. 14 . . . 0-0! A bold decision. Black's king- side pawn structure might be smashed as a result of a pawn storm with g2-g4-g5, This plan takes time, however, and Black is already prepared to begin his own storm by b7-b5. 15 5z)xd6 A% A , ‘I, : '’/ '’’/ . . , , % %% I / /4 ”%aa @g%a% a as 16 KM? A poor move which loses an important tempo. Theoretical debate centres on 16 0-0-0 b5 17 eb cb 18 <$b1, and if Black defends the pawn with 18 Edi then after 19 5De5 5Db6 (The endgame after 19 @xe5 20 de E64 21 Exeéi @xe4 22 . fie3 favours White. ) 20 f3 ¢'13c4 21 kc] the threat of g2-g4-g5 is very unpleasant. In the event of 18 §fc8 19 g4 (not 19 Exb5? Eab8 20 ‘! e2 Ebfi 21 RC1 3De4!) 19 I‘Bxg420 Ehgl f5 21 @e5 ®dxe5 22 de ‘1§’xe5 23 Uxe5 ~’vhxe5 24 _@. c3 White has the advantage after either 24 Exe3 25 be, or 24 Ec5 25 f4 5Dg4 26 Ed7 e5 27 1e. Of course, Black doesn't have to take the g-pawn. By playing 19 BC6! 20 5De5 -"43xe5 21 de Ec2+ 22 ®al Qe4 he obtains a solid position. If White replies to 18 Efc8 with 19 5De5, then once again Black is able to find real counterplay: 19 $427 20 ficl QXCS! 21 de Qd5 22 Ed4 (22 g4 9C4) 22 b4 23 Eg4 ®h8 and the threat of 24 Eab8 and 25 58:23 may turn out to be effective. It is possible that White must force a draw with 24 . &xh6 gh 25 Edl ®h7 (dangerous is 26 f6 27 Ego flg8 28 ef1!h7 29 ®al) 26 !1d3+ one 27 ttrdz. 16 . . . b5 17 $1] be 18 ‘§1xc4 Hd5 19 We2 flbs Black hastens to get to an cndgame and thereby risks losing a large part of his advantage. 19 3fb8 would have been good, eg. A Thirteen Year Old Abroad I7 20 b3 a5 or 20 RM Eb4!. 20 b3? This gives his opponent an opportunity to initiate a queenside attack. By 20 $xb5 cb 21 see §fc8 22 @d3 White could have activated his king for the defence of important squares. 20 . . . a5 21 5De5 a4 22 fih3 E1118 23 ‘Hxb5 eb 24 1'43c6 §e8 2513a ha 26 EC] 5Db6 27 ~'3De5 It is not worthwhile to remove his knight from a position in which it can temporarily limit the activity of his opponent's rook. Also possible, but by no means obligatory, is 27 t§e2 5z)bd5 28 Ed} fiec8 29 fihhl E216 30 5Ae5 Exel 31 fixcl 5Dxh5 32 Ec8+ @h7 33 513x17 @hf4+ 34 _Qxf4 5Dxf4+ 35 t&e4 5Dxg2 36 Eh8+ Qgé 37 -‘»Dxh6 Ebé 38 lDg4 §b2 39 5De5+ $ig5 40 §g8 with a draw. 27 . . . Eec8 28 Eb] Qe4 29 ie] @d5 30 EM @d6! This forces the rook off the seventh rank since on 31 Ed7, 31 fiaél traps the rook. 31 §b2 §ab8 32 §xb8 Exb8 33 5Dd7 White would also be in trouble after 33 £213 §a8 34 . @.d2 lDb5 35 Ed} fic8. 33 . . . Eb] 34 3:23 am It was still possible to make a mistake: 34 @b4? 35 Exa4 Qcz? 36 fla8+ ®h7 37 lZf8+ étgs 38 5r3g6+ ®h7 39 Eh8 mate.
  13. 13. /8 A Thirteen Year Old Abroad 35 §d3 35 Exa4 leads to the loss ofthe exchange after 35 @d2+ 36 @e2 é)c3+ 37 é7xd2 5.Bxa4. 35 . . . Ea] 35 5Af4 would have been immediately decisive. since if the rook retreats Black plays 36 @d2+. 36 g3 Ex-a2 37 5Ac5 23 0:1 From round 7: G. Kasparov-Z. Kengis Queen's Pawn Game A47/A48 1 d4 5DI'6 2 QB I16 3 EM 5ib7 4 e3 e5 5 5Dbd2 g6 6 c3 _Qg7 7 h3 0-0 8 9.92 QC6 9 0-0 d6 I0 a4 36?! White has played the opening modestly and Black has obtained a sufficiently comfortable position. At this point I0 5Da5. inviting 11 b4. doesn‘t look bad. e. g. I I cb I2 Cb Q3661} ‘yb3 e5! or I3 Ebl a5!. After the move actually made by Black and White-‘s reply, the weakness of the b6 square makes itself felt. II ‘The-4 b5 ll 9d5 I2 9.lt2 b5 is weaker because of 13 Qed2l b4 |4e4 QXI6 I5 d5. I2 Ga3 b4 I3 eb Qlxb-4!? After I3 eb(l3 ed‘? I4 b5) 14 (M4 White has a positional advantage. With the text move Black attempts to solve the problems which have arisen using tactical means. 14 dc l'z3fd5! Of course not I4 dc I5 Eel /4)fd5 I6 . Qe5 when White has Ll clear advantage. 15 ed! 9.xh2 Tempting. But stronger was 15 5:]xf4 16 cf _QXb2 I7 ybfl! 9.xf3! I8 _Qxf3 flxal I9 de (19 fixax ‘gxdo yields nothing. and neither does I9 ‘gxbéi 3138 20 de Exbéi 21 edy §xd8 22 Exal Exa4) I9 Hxe7 20 9.xa8 §_d4 with definitecompensation forthe pawn. At this moment Black, evidently. was hoping for even more . . . I6 .9.h6l 388 (I5) Kengis steadfastly decided to win the exchange. unimpressed by either 16.. . lacfl l7I§’d2 b3xe2+ I8 I! 'lxe2 flxal I9 _@. xf8 ‘gxdb 20 9.xe7 with an extra pawn for White. or I6 ed I7 fixfx Hxfti I8 ‘HCIZ fig‘! I9 5Dd4 with a positional advantage (I9 RC3 20 ‘IWCI RC8 21 [AC4 is not dangerous). / é Kg}. /// %A Q «.5 7// //1, W/5% %a%a@ I7 d7ll Wxd7 I8 Ute-I _Qxa1 I9 Ill/ xal 05'. ’ Having lured the black queen on to the d7 square. White had counted on regaining the exchange after the superior 19 £': )f6(I9 f6 20 e4) by 20 ®b6 Eco 2] faxax. with a clear positional superiority. Kengis found a resource to continue the struggle for material advantage (19 e5 20 e4? ~’AI'4! etc. ) but, apparently. forgot the important diagonals and Sqllures. 20 éexeS ‘Q96 21 [1)g4 f6 22 RC4! E98 23 e4! 1-0 The next game is from a training match with a local rival. played in Baku during I977. E. Magerramov-G. Kasparov Queen's Gambit Declined D58 I -‘BI3 I’/ M6 2 d4 96 3 c4 d5 4 5Ac3 fi. e7 5 figs MS 6 RM 0-0 7 e3 I16 8 Ebll 9.b7 9 ixffi flxffi 10 ed ed 11 Ed] I had chosen this well—known , 1 Ir» . .. rink . .i. ..r>. '. A Thirleert Year Old Abroad /9 position of the Tartakowcr vari— ationinordertotestaninteresting idea connected with the sacrifice of a pawn. If ll id} Black solves all the opening problems with ll C5! 12 dc é‘id7 leading to equal play after 13 0-0 é3xc5 orif I3 cbgiving Black a strong initiative by I3 5Dc5 14 E/ C2 ®xd3+! I5 Em] Ebfi. 11 Ed] is an attempt to restrain Black‘s counlerplay. but . . . II . . . C51? I2 dc ®d7 13 c6!'. ’ 13 ch would meet the needs of the position better, but faced with a theoretical novelty Magerramov decided to play more safely. 13 . . . 9.xe6 I4 ! Dd4’. ' After I4 9.52 QCS I5 HC2 ECS one could certainly not speak
  14. 14. 20 A Thirteen Year Old Abroad of White's “advantage“. This most natural move by the knight unexpectedly leads into difficulties‘ 14 . . . .Qxd4! 15 §xd4 On 15 ed, 15 ‘§'g5 would be unpleasant. l5 . . . €'4Jc5 16 Ed] &'13e6 17 2.12 M! 18 ed Black would have a strong initiative in the event of IS @e2 Eg5l l9 Qxdél Q)xd4 20 ZXJ4 fiad8l 18 . . . §e8 19 f3 (16) After 19 as :21r4+ 20 iez (20 Ee2 5Dxd5!) 20 5Axg2+ Zl Efl . Qd7! it is hardly possible to repulse Black's attack eg. 22 $xg2 ‘$g5+ 23 Sfl . Qh3+ 24 Eel Hg? “ With the move in the game White prepares to evacuate the king to f2, not worrying about the discovered check, nor fearing I9 lQh4+, viz. 20 g3 Eff: 21 @f2! A terrible blow! The next few moves are forced. 20 gf After 20 Hxffs I’/ Zg5+ White has no prospects. 20 . . . Hh4+ 21 E12 5Dxd4+ 22 £92 5Dxf3+ 23 éfl flh3+ 24 §g2 12)h4 25 Egl Ead8 26 ‘gel? The best chance was 26 ‘lé9a4l 5:3xg2 27 Exg2 E65 28 ‘¥g4 Hxg/1 29 . Q.xg4 f5 30 Rf} g5. White's position would be difficult, but a fight would still be possible. 26 . . . Ed3! 27 Ell 5Df3l ([7) an XV %y %y ’ 7% W» / /L I/ //.51// %W White's pieces are just about stalemated — a rare situation. If 28 . ¢.xd3 3Bxh2 mate or 28 5hd5 Edl+! 29 fixdl Qxh2 mate; 28 Hg3 is met by 28 3Ad2+ 29 fie] Exg3 30 §xg3 51f3+ 31 Q1? Glxgl. 8 % 28 Eli] Ede} 29 Egl em; 30 Eh] b5! Intending 31 b4; if 31:13 a5. 0-] 3 Age Fourteen: I AGE Junior Qualifying Artur Yusupov won the double-round qualifying I4 tournament held in Leningrad in April l977 as Kasparov turned fourteen. This event was to decide who represented the USSR in the coming Junior (under 20) World Championship to be held in Columbia. And Yusupov went on to win the world junior title. USSR Junior Qualifying I. ('nin_trrarl April I977 II2 '. ) A. Yusupov G. Kasparov Z. Lanka E. Magerramov L. Zaid A. Haritonov A. Yermo| insky S. Dolmatov *x°—xx» “°‘X°#§ '/2 ‘k ‘/2 '/2 0 l 0 '/ ~ eo~IaUIaL»Nr- As usual Gary played extremely energetically. Here is his ending with Yermolinsky (white) (/8): Play went 50 ®g4 51 fif6 Eli3+ 52 é’Jg2 Eg3+ 53 22:12 fig]-+ 54 éhl RC5 55 E212 film 56 éhz Eh3+ 57 avg] [15 58 Ef8 EB 59 322+ figs 60 33xg3+- é’; xg3 61 Qfl a4 62 Eel g4 63 @113 a3 64 ®c4 ties 65 tabs cam 66 mm égs 67 ®c2 g3 as was a2 0-1 . .‘. u_°°#X""~ 3 4 4 5 5 6 6 7 7 ‘/3 I 0 I I V? ‘/2 '/2 0 7 I '/ ~ '/ w I 0 0 I I 0 6 ‘/2 ‘I I I I 0 ‘/2 0 ‘/1 I 6 0 ‘k ‘k 0 ‘/3 I I I ‘/3 6 I I ‘/3 ‘k t '/3 I I 0 6 I 0 0 ‘/3 0 i ‘k I I 6 0 0 '/ _~ 0 I 0 0 ‘A’ ‘A’ 4 '/1 '/2 ix % 2 V
  15. 15. 22 Age Fourteen: I Round 3 from the same event: G. Kasparov-L. Zaid Sicilian. Najdorf B97 1 e4 c5 2 5Df3 d6 3 d4 ed 4 -’«Dxd4 t'41f6 5 5Dc3 a6 6 _QgS e6 7 f4 3% 8 Ed2 ¥xb2 9 @b3 ‘§a3 10 .9.xf6 gf 11 9.022 Qd7 12 0-0 I15 13 ‘IQCI4 b5 14 QEIJI @3415 c4 b4 I6 f5 3167 I7 fe fe 18 5D1d2 Hc6 19 a3 ba 20 Qhl Ebs 21 Zxa3 ll! b6 22 ‘gal #295 23 c5! dc 24 QC4 ¥$’c7 25 Qhd2 @xe4 26 Qhxe-4 Eb4 27 e5! (third pawn to be sacrificed) 27 ft: 28 Ed]! .9.d7 29 Ex-a6 h4 30 h3 §g8 (/9) Ma 7/7/ éxé . . . % %a%a% 31 §xe6l %d8 31 9.xC6 32 . ¢.h5+ 32 Exe5 Excdl? 33 ‘§9d5I If 33 .9.xc4 Exefi 34 flxgx . Qd6l 33 . . . Exg2 34 QXC4 E13 35 Il’la8+ ‘l§’c8 36 Ié'laS+ fies Ii‘ 36 H67 37 ‘£9Xc7+ ESXC7 38 EXC7. 37 9.f7+ é/ f8 38 ie6+ 271:7 (Or 38 @208 39 . QXd7"') 39 'i‘_’laII @Jh6 40 WcI+ 9.125 4] Exg5! €’! 'e6+ 42 9.115 2613+ 43 tag: 1-o l0" 13> tB*_. Youth Games, Moscow 1977 The Youth Games, staged in Moscow, July 3-13 1977 between teams of six juniors from the sixteen Soviet republics (including Moscow and Leningrad), was not a Kasparov sensation point—wise — he scored 4‘/3 from 7 games on board one for Azerbaidzhan (best result S. Dolmatov 6‘/3-1 ‘/1) — but possibly an important learning step. Ukraine won preliminary section 2 by 15-3 ahead of Azerhaidzlmn (Gary's team) ll‘/3. Izstonia 5 and Kirgizstan 4‘/3. In the match with Iistonia Gary had a desperate struggle with a possible future rival: . I.EhIvest-G. Kasparov Caro-Kann B13 1e4e62e4d53eded4cd19Jf6 5 5Ae3 G.3xd5 6 d4 5De6 7 -%f3 .9.g4 8 W113 fi. xf3 9 gf 52116 10 933 06 ll Eg1.Q. b412 flb5 ads 13 Exg7 Whfa 14 fill 5Dxe3 15 . Qxc6+ Iélxefi 16hc . ¢.l‘8 I7 Eg5 9.9718 §h5 WXI3 19 Zxb7 0-0 20 Kb] . Qf6 21 Ed] l£‘lh3+ 22 t$e2 ®h8 23 ‘EM e5 24 HQ ‘I£’Ie6 25 d5 ‘&a6+ 26 «$991 fi>. g7 27 fixfl (:4 28 fIxl‘8+ EXIX 29 EH04 .9.xe3+ 30 tiidl 9.1.57 31 a4 Eie8 32 E1125 ‘¥5’f6 33 ll‘/ [14 Eds 34 $23e2 1§c3 35 EM lé9c2+ 36 @111 1‘! d3+ 37 @521 (20) 37 31:8! 38 RES Hxdi 39 Exg7 ‘iixg7 40 . Q.f6'. ’ (40 I; !iC8+ ‘H118 4] ‘l!7c3 I16 42 tfifll? $$ih7! wins) 40 ‘E9d1+! 0-1 (Time — 45 moves 2‘/4 hours). %%%; aW W ’ / 2 2/ Va In one semi-final section Georgia and Azerbaidzhan each scored I0-8, ahead of RSFSR 9‘/3 and Age Fourteen: I 23’ Byelorussya 61/3. The Kor/ uhov- Kasparov game was to he one of the subjects of an article. headed Zvimai Sz'z'kne. r.r in Shakmaty Riga No.12/I981. written by leading trainer Vladimir Zak, critical of the clock handling. Georgia beat Ukraine 4‘/ /;-l ‘/3 in the final play-off for first and second places and Azerbaidzhan drew 3-3 with Moscow for third/ fourth places but lost on tie-break which was influenced by Gary's loss to Dolmatov. World Cadet Championship 1977 16 year old Jon Arnason, already Iceland's national champion. won the first official World championship for Cadets (under 17) held at Cagnes-sur-mer in the South of France. September 8-19. 1977. This 32-player ll-round event was much stronger than the 1976 World Cadet Cup and Botvinnik considered Garik's result - a clear third behind Jay Whitehead (USA) — good. Gary was much younger than most of the other competitors. And he beat the winner. War/ d (‘upfor (‘uil<'I, Cagnc. s'-. tur-rnm' 8-l9.9. I977 1 3 3 I . I.I. .Arnas0n ISD t I 0 2 . I.Whitehcad USA 0 if '/5 3 G. Kasparov URS 1 ‘/5 t 4 M. K-appe GER 0 0 1 5 I. Morovic CHI ‘/3 '/ _» ‘/ _~ 6 A. Negu| t‘scu ROM 0 0 0 7 M. Sant0 Roman I’I{A 0 ‘/5 ‘/3 8 J. Pajak CDN 0 9 N. Short IiN(1 10 / .Sendur TRK 0 1. 1 J. I)elancy (| RI, ), (i, Snppe (ARG). A. (irecnfeld (ISL), .. F. Sequeir. i (1’()R)_ M. Andersen (1)1-ZN). 11.Zuger (SW'/ ,) . , 4 5 (2 7 8 9 0 Rm‘! I ‘/3 1 1 l 3 ‘/3 9 I ‘/3 I ‘/1 5 8 '/ z 0 ‘/3 I ‘/1 I 4 8 * ‘/3 I 4 7'/ ; * ‘/ ~ I ‘/ _~ 4 7 ‘/3 it 1 I 4 ‘/3 7 '/ _~ 0 * 0 5 6 ‘/ z 0 t 6 ‘/3 6 ‘/1 0 ‘/2 0 at 5 ‘/3 6 0 l * 5 6 12: ('. McNzib (SCO). M. I)r. 'tsko (.1110) (1: 13-20: M. Bergstmn1 (SVI-I). nssnn (NOR). 21-24: / .1.ope/ (COL). I). Wcider (l’()l. ), C. I)ep1tsqti. 'ile (AUS). Jane (iurwell (W15) 5; l. I"i)uca| tll (I~'RA). S. '|'rinidade (HRS). M. I.esl<i (FR / ). R. N,Hcrtholec(NI. I)). $. Cil1zt7,7.ai (TUN). R. l1rcver (I! l’, L). Y. (indin (LUX), Ii. I)i Cent (1 I‘/ )
  16. 16. 24 Age Fourteen: I J. Arnason-G. Kasparov Sicilian, Scheveningen B85 1 e4 e5 2 QB 96 3 d4 cd 4 5Dxd4 Qfé 5 Q03 d6 6 9.92 a6 7a4 QC6 8 9.23 §. e7 9 0-0 0-0 10 f4 ‘QC7 ll élll Eds (ECO B85 gives ll Qa5. ll 9.d7, ll $118 and 11 5Dxd4) 12 ‘gel (if I2 if} Q65) 12 51)xd4 13 . ¢.xd4 e5 14 fe de 15 9.93 .9.e616 ‘$g3 B3517 Eadl? ! (17 9.g5 $h8 18 . Qd3 intending 513d5 is more active. ) 17.. . Exd1l8 Exdl Ed8 19 Exds flXd8 20 . ¢.h6 g6 21 h3 flhfi 22 9.93 . Q.d4 23 El? .iixe3 24 E’xe3 (21) 24 91:4! 25 b3 EH4 26 ¥d3 ®g7! 27 9.11 «ans! 28 yrs (If 23 Exdct 5Bg3+! 29 egi ed 30 5L‘1e2 52Jxe2+ 31 _Qxe2 @f6 the bishop ending is unpromising for White. ) 28 ‘E’d2 29 ‘E113 H12 30 ®h2 QM 3] ‘QB Etxcz 32 5bd5 . Q.xd5 33 ed Edl 34 fled f5 35 Hg3 hti 36 d6 Exd6 37 ECS @h5 38 $.92 Qlfé 39 Hes e4+ 40 EM ‘§'e7 0-]. One report commented that Gary and Ivan Morovié made a most effective team at table football! USSR v. Australia, telex Telex matches can be long drawn out affairs. But Gary Kasparov avoided this bleak prospect in the USSR-Australia Telex-Olympiad 8 board match (September 24, 1977) by beating Guy West on the junior board as follows: G. Kasparov-G. West Sicilian B40 le4 c5 2 QB ibis 3 5)e3 e64d4 cd 5 G3xd4 N14 6 es @115 7 . ©.d2 ®xc3 8 be 9J8 9 . ©.d3 d6 I0 t§e2 am (22) ll Qlxefil $116 12 5Ac7+! 1-0 Even that had taken 4'/3 hours to play and transmit. The top five boards were all drawn but the USSR three bottom boards all won. “I was fourteen when I realised that chess was going to be my life. “ — Kasparov, 1982. 4 Minsk 1978 AGE I978 saw Kasparoi/ ‘s dramatic leaps forward. He I4 was first in a strong tournament at Minsk. and then first in the Otborochnii at Daugavpils which led to being easily the youngest to play in the Top League of the USSR Championship. One immediately thinks of Capablanca‘s advance (beating Marshall in l909, winning San Sebastian in l9l l aged 20-22), Tal‘s progress to the world title 1957-60 (aged 21-23), Fischer US Champion beginning of I958 to Candidate 1959 (age 14-15) for comparison. The first thrust went almost unremarked in many foreign periodicals. The young man from Baku playing in the 8th A. P.Sokolsky Memorial Tournament at Minsk in January, personally internationally unrated, beat his first grandmaster, Lutikov, in equal combat. He came first ahead of 14 rated players who averaged 2414 points; against these Sokolsky Memorial, Minsk I978 I2,i4567H91IIJ, ?45/>78 l(3.Kasparm1 —-v1~ll1.00lll‘. ~l'~llllll3 2 V. Kupn. -icliik 2530 1: w 1 1. 1. 11.1 1.1 1 1 1 1 1. 1. 1.1 121/1 3 M. Shereshevsk_ 2450 0 0 . 1. 1. 1.1 1.1.; .1 1.1.1.1 1 1 1 1 11 4 A. Kapengut 2405 o 1,. . 0 .151 1 1 0 1.1 1 1 101/: 5 Va. K|ovan 2490 1., 1 11.. .!) 1.1 -:1 1.1 1 101/; 5 E. Moclia| ov 2450 1 1.. . , . 1 0 .1 1.1., ;; .1 1 :1 101/. 7 V. Didisl1k0 2415 1 .0 . 1: 0 o 1 1 1 0 1.1 1 1 91/, 8 / .l. utikov 2540 0 o . .1 1. .1 1. 1. 1. . .01 1 1 1,. 91/, 9 S. Yul'erov 1450 o . . 1. .1.1 0 . .01 1.0 1 1 1 9 l0A. Roizman _oo. ..1,. o111.~. ..11.1oo1118% 11 A. ZaklI-arov 241.0 1.0 0 011.01. .1..1,. 1111. .1 31/, 12 S. Begun 2Js0oo1,. u1,. ,0,.1,. .1..1.11.1018 13 V. Smirnov 2275 1.. D 1,. 0 0 1. o 1..0 u .1.. . 1 1 1 1 1 s l4V. Litvinov 7o0o1., .n111..10o0.o0117 15 B. Maryasin 225001.o». o011.o11o1.o1~11.1. 7 “N-Kazan 2340o1.001.». o0o0«.0o1nan.4 17 V. Veremeiehil( 2300 o 1. o 0 0 .0 0 0 01.10 01 1: w 0 3'/2 lBA. Lyi1boshits _000o0o011ooon0o1.11.2%
  17. 17. 26 Minsk I978 score (l0-4). Gary’s performance earned him the USSR title ofMaster of Sport. He over~fulfilled the required norm by 3'/2 points! A bewildered spectator at Minsk began to berate the Byelorussyan chess organisers: “Our masters are losing to kids! There's something wrong . 4 . " The usually taciturn Janis Klovan standing nearby was provoked to retort “You're getting upset about nothing. You'll hear more about that kid. " The nature of Kasparov‘s success demanded such responses. His wins stemmed from full-blooded struggles evolving from Gary‘s tremendously energetic style backed by a constantly creative, (i. e. innovative and improvising) approach. . . our chief figure is 15 year old Gary Kasparov ofSpartak, Baku. He has studied in our school for five years and matured in all areas. At the time of the February examination session in 1978, I found myself without an assistant. Gary successfully filled this role in the parts concerning opening analysis‘ “In January of that year, Gary participated in Minsk in a formidable tournament, the Sokolsky Memorial. where he took first place. Here is an example of the ‘chief figure’ of our school. " - Botvinnik in Sm11'c’I.1’k)' Sport, April 9th 1978. G. Kasparov-A. Roizman Spanish C61 (Noley by M. Botvinnik) 1 e4 e5 2 QB ~‘«Dc6 3 _Qb5 ‘$0.14 4 5Dxd4 ed 5 0-0 9.c5 6d3 c6 7 _§. c4d6 8 f4 Characteristic of Kasparov's style of play: he begins active operations at the first opponunity. 8 . . . Q31?» 9 e5 de Probably 9 5Zd5 was sharper, not allowing the opening of the f—file. 10 9.xf7+ Now Black will have to forego castling, on top of which White will have a better pawn structure, but most important of all — the turmoil is beginning. The first attack, however, is successfully turned back by Black. 10 . . . @xf7 11 fe ENS 12 cf gf I3 5Dd2 figs Black demonstrates that he too has play — along the g-file. 14 @104 £07 15 9.14 age 16 ‘ge2 Hg‘! 17 El? Eag8 Black plays for the attack himself but his king remains in a precarious position. 17 <$g7 was called for, followed by $h8. 18 Eael Enviable comparison: White is not endangered by an attack on the pawn at g2, since he can seal the g—file with a minor piece. Therefore Black puts the h-pawn into the games 18 11503) at “/2 / 2 V / . . ,/ , %,maea2 I9 £125! As soon as his opponent feels secure. White unleashes an un- expected stroke — to reply I9 fixgfi isn‘t on, because of 20 Qxfol and Black‘s position is torn asunder. The hopeless position of his king begins to tell. %W --s s II! 19 . . . ‘E4!d8 20 WM Q06 21 h4 Burning his bridges — the bishop has nowhere to flee. But what‘s next? 21 . . . .9.d5 (24) , j / ¢ / / {I/ yr /4 Black, it seems, had suspicions only about one danger: 22 . Qxf6 Exf6 23 yeil with the unstoppable threats of24 ~’9Jxf6 and ®g5+r But now there follows a new and already decisive blow! The only Minsk [978 27 possibility to continue the struggle was 21 _@. g4. 22 gm Transgressing the standards of positional tenets. White exposes the position of his own king . A . but it is important that the rook on go turns out to be in danger A it is this which decides the battle 22 . . . @7g7 Belated retreat. ()n 22 hg there would have followed 23 h5. It was hardly possible to prolong the resistance by 22 . Qxe4 bccattsc of 23 gh Ii6g7 24 fixc4. 23 gh lg 24 lye-5+ 92Jh6 25 hgfi gh 26 Efs <&7xg6 27 t$h2 1:0 A dynamic game! Kasparov comments: “To the analysis by M. Botvinnik Isltould like to add a few beautiful variations. " "Black could defend the h-pawn which was attacked by the move 22 g4! with 22 Ehli. Against this there was prepared 23 Sixfol Exg4+ 24 lélxg-1 hg 25 £xe7+! $xe7 26 ®t:5+. or 23 fixfol 24 g5 . @.Xe4 25 Exe4 $g7 26 ace SIB 27 $h2 — Black's position is very bad, but he could still continue to resist. " “After 19 9.35! Black had the curious -counter-attacking move l9 $113. which would have been best refuted by 20 Qxfo jixfo 21 ‘yxf6-H with mate in a few moves, or 20 Hxg2+ 2l Bxg2 _Qxg2 22 Exe7+! ."
  18. 18. 28 Minsk I978 G. Kasparov-S. Begun QGD, Semi-Tarraseh D42 1d4d52e4e635De3 5Af64£'4]f3e5 5 cd 5Dxd5 6 e3 5z3c6 7 _@. d3 9.97 8 0-0 0-0 9 %xd5 Glancing at the I-Iricyclopedia of (‘hers Openings one may discover that 9 5Dxd5 does not give White an opening advantage. But the same conclusion is reached in this manual about the other possible continuations here — 9 I‘be4, 9 Ee2, 9 Eel and 9 a3. 9 . . . Exd5 10 e4 Ed8 11 de . §.xc5 The position arising after 11 5Db4 12 Rel .9.xc5 is considered to be equal. but is this really so? For example 13 a3 QC6 14 b4 _Qd4 15 5z3xd4 5z3xd4 16 . ¢.b2 -'4)xe2+ 17 Exe2 and, notwithstanding the simplifications, White retains the initiative. 12 e5 . tP. e7 13 Ee2 @114?! It would have been better to exchange knights with 13 5Ad4. 14 Rb] 9.d7 15 a3 5Dd516 Ee4 g617 9.h6 Eefl 18 h4! (25) M32 A , .:_/ ,%a? 2 18 . . . E116 19 h5! f5? It is not simple to defend against White’s violent attack. On the natural 19 Exb2 there would have followed 20 E212 Eb5 21 Eg4 Ea4 22 Eg3 _Q. f8 23 . ¢.xf8 Exf‘8 and now not 24 hg‘! fg 25 ixgé Ef4!, but 24 Ed2l with the intention of transferring the rook to the kingside via d4. Of course it seemed to Black that 19 f5 sucessfully solved the problems of defence. Indeed, after 20 ef £Dxf6 the storming pawn at h5 is lost. Nevertheless, Black‘s evaluation at this point, as at his 13th turn, proved to be superficial. 20 ef 32x16 21 Eel! 5Dxh5 22 5595 flbs 23 9.xg6! (26) % 2,9/A . .%4% , 9;”), 4/291 7’'/ /%V / /// /fly / / On 23 hg, 24 Ee4 . @.f8 25 Exg6+ 5Dg7 26 55Jg4 wins. 23 . . . £216 24 fi. xh7+l Crude, but correct. White mates after both 24 $xh7 25 Ebl+ and after 24 5Dxh7 25 Ee4. 1:0 / /2.3. %a% , . s Gary’s first ‘one to one’ win over a grandmaster, played in the last round: G. Kasparov-A. Lutikov Old Indian A46 1.14 are 2 cars :16 3 ages 9.g4 4e4 ‘BN7 (4 e6; 4 c6) 5 e5 h3g8 (5 de 6 de 9.xf3 7 Exf3 5Dxe5 8 Exb7 i) 6 h3 ixf3 (6 .9.h5 7 g4 igé 8 114 intending e6) 7Exf3e68 _W. f4 (8 ed! ed 9 d5 c5 10 . Qf4) 8 d5 (8 e6 9 ed Qdfél 10 0-0-0 fixdé 11 9.e5! i) 9 e6 fe 10 _Qd3 5Dgf6 11 Ee2g6(1 1 Eb6 120-0—0 0-0-0 13 Exefi Exd4 14 Exc6+ bc 15 iafi mate) 12 Exe6 . Qg7 13 0-0 4Dh5 14 §. g5'. ’! Qdfs (After 14 .9.xd4!’. ’ I planned 15 3Dxd5 ed 16 .9.b5 @f6 17 Eadl Eb618 9.xd7+. but at home saw 16 a6 intending 3Zle5) I5 Eg4 Q16 16 E92 Ed6 17 Eael (intending f4, f5) 17 e6 (If 17 ®f7 18 9.h4l5De619 9.g3. e. g. 19 Qxd-4 20 E63 Eb4 21 a3 or 19 Ed7 20 .9.e5 followed by f4, f5) 18 @214 @177 19134 136 (19 Exb4? 20 QCS) 20 Ed2 Ee8 21 . Qf4 Ee7 (21 Ed7 22 c4 dc 23 RXC4) 22 b5 E33 (22 C5 23 dc be 24 c4) 23 QC3 c5 24 5Db1! E214 (24 E134 25 EXIJ4 Cb 26 . Qd6', 24 Exa2?? 25 5Dc3) 25 dc be 26 c4 lz)8d7 (26 dc 27 5Dc3 or 26 d4 to exploit the position of Blacks queen) 27 -’»Dc3 E35 28 Ee2 Ed8 (If 28 e5 29 fld2! d4 30 -Qe4 Minsk 1978 29 Ebé 31 5Dg5+) 29 . fig5 Qb6 30 214 de (30 E67 31 Cd ed 32 a5 5i3bd7 33 5Dxd5 Qxdfo 34 9.04) 31 9&4 Ee7 32 a5 (32 flcointending Edl) 32 5DlJd7 33 . Q.c6 513113 34 Edl Exa5 35 5De4 EN! 36 . Qf4 lz]xc6 37 be Q88?! (27) (37 5Dxe4 38 Exe4 _9.d4) "/ "/ / . , / %; %p%, % 2 2,22 38 Ed7! Exd7 39 ed (M6 40 -'/3116+ ®e7 41 Qxc4 (or 41 5r)b7l'. ’) 41 E216 42 . €.d6+ i%: xd743 . t‘>. xf8 . ¢.xf8 44 Ed3+ é7e7 (44 Q57 45 Eel) 45 fidl @d5 46 E94 M7 (46 43c3'.7 47 Eh4+) 47 3De5+ s$g8 48 5Dd7 c4 49 flbl Ed6 50 EM (50 5Dxf8!’? Inc} 51 Eat? inxbl 52 £2)xe6+ $17 53 lZig5+ $e7 54 Eb7+ and Exb1winning)50.. .c3 51 -5Dxf8 ®xf8 52 Exh7 Ef4 53 Exf4 53x14 54 «$711 25 55 E27 ads 56 §xa5 ®f7(Setting a trap: 57 @e2 @f4+ 58 $43? c2 59 §c5 ! Dd3 60 Exc2 5z)e1+) 57 g3 1:0 (Notes based on Kasparov‘s in Shakmaiy Riga)
  19. 19. 5 Top League! AGE Otborochnii at Daugapils 15 The Otborochnii (Qualifying) Tournament stage of the 46th USSR Championship held in the Latvian town of Daugavpils had 64 grandmasters and masters competing in a l3~round Swiss system event for one place in the Top League (final) Tournament and a further eight players for places in the (semi-final) First League Tournament. The fifteen year old ‘Ba/ rirzrk_V‘ schoolboy, Gary Kasparov, took the giant step into the Top League by virtue ofa streak of5‘/3 points from six from rounds 2-8 and a superior Bucholz tie-breaker. And this meant into the top echelons of world chess. Gary's co-winner, Igor lvunov. who started with two losses and then reeled off six straight wins before being contained by Gary in 40 moves in round 9, had to be content with a place in the First League, shared 14th place there and thus failed to reach the Top League. What such minute differences lead to! (1// mrnrli/ ill. D1l1I_t, '(l)‘[7f/ .1‘ 36.6 — I-1.7. IWN I 3 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Rm’! 1 G. Kasparov t ‘/2 ‘/2 ‘/1 ‘/3 1 ‘/2 1 4V: 9 2 Llvanov 2415 ‘/ ~ ‘k 1 '/ _v ‘/ _~ 6'/ » 9 3 V. Kupreichik 2530 '/ _~ 0 ‘k ‘/3 '/ ~ 1 ‘/3 5'/3 81/; 4 / .Mikhalehishin 2460 | /» 1/, 1/; it 1 ‘/ ,~ 5‘/ ; 8‘/2 5 A. Kapengut 2465 1/, 1/; ‘/3 it '/1 6'/ ~ 8'/ ; 6 A. Panehenko 2495 0 0 it ’/ ; X 8'/ ; 7 V. Tseshkovsky 2550 ‘/3 0 ‘/3 1' 1 (i'/ _- 8‘/ z 8 L. A1burt 2510 I) ‘/3 0 it ‘/5 7 8 9 S. Makarichev ‘/ ~ ‘/ w VV * 6'/ ; 8 Kasparov also bcat_R, Korsunsky (R3), S.1.putian (R5). M. '1‘. seit| in (.7480) (R6), S. I’alatnik (2490) (R7). drew with Yu. Niko1itycvsky (2475) (R4), and lost to R. Holmov (3540) (R2). From round 1: G. Kasparov-A. Panchenko Sicilian B67 12:4 c5 2 5213 l£)c63 d4 cd 4 5Dxd4 5Df6 5 {AC3 d6 6 9.gS e6 7 Ed2 a6 8 0-0-0 . ¢.d7 9 f4 b5 A popular, but dubious, system. 10 , ¢_xf6 gf(l0.. .Exf6?1le5de i2 Qdxb5) ll @xc6 ixco 12 .9.d3(or 12 Ee3, or 12 Eel! ) gives White a stable advantage. The route I chose is not had either. 10 Qxcfi RXC6 11 9.d3 R67 12 e5 de 13 fe Qd7 Weaker is 13 Qd5 I4 .9.xe7 Exe7 15 5De4 0-016 Ehfl with the threat of 03161! 14 9.xe7 Exe7 15 £124! . §.xe4 A game with Yermolinsky in Leningrad 1977. complicated un~ favourably for me: 15 ECS 16 Ehel Ea717 fixer: EXC6 18 E12 E05 19 Ee3 0-0 20 t? )e4 Exe5 21 Eg3 Eaatl! and White was left missing a pawn. But the matter lies not in the strength of 15 Ec5, but rather in the following mistakes by White. Thus, instead of 18 E12, better is 18 Eg5 or 18 Ed6, and instead of 16 IIhc1intcr- esting is 16 fixcfv Exco 17 %e4 0~0 18 4116+! In this game. Panchenko chooses a much more principled continuation, accepting White's pawn sacrifice. even though afterwards Black will have to experience an unpleasant attack. 16 -‘2xc-4 -‘7xe5 Tap League. ‘ 31 17 Ed4 f6 18 l23d6+ $18 19 fihfl ézgtl (28) It isn't easy to defend after 19 0317 20 Eb6 5Dxd6 21 Exdé $17 22 Eel e5 23 Eco either. / W2 / . - . V2 ’ 2,/ ///2, %V W 20 g4! h6 21 h4 4317 Worthy of attention was the sacrifice of the exchange: 21 Ed8l'. ’ 22 Q15 Exd4 23 I/ xc7+ E17 24 Exd4 éJxe7, but perhaps the most resistant was 21 Efil. 22 Ee4! E18 23 Q15 E98 24 Q. )d4 e5 On 24 ~5_‘c5 there follows 25 g5, and now 25 mg, 26 hg Ego is no good because of27 Exgo 5Dxg6 28 5Dxc(a Eels 29 gfl 25 @315 h5 (29)
  20. 20. 32 Top League! Black is cramped. 26 fig] Eh7 After 26 5Ah6 there is already the decisive 27 15Axg7l $xg7 28 gh+ etc. 27 ‘QIJ7 érhs 28 gh H96 29 5Bxg7!! §’xa2 It's easy to be convinced ofthe strength of White‘s threats after 29 fixg7 30 Exg7 ®xg7 31 Wg2+ ®h8 32 Egl. 29 EC4 doesn't change anything after 30 ébll 30 3997 Eg8 Or 30 ‘$211+ 31 @d2 §d8+ 32 ‘Hxd8+. 31 ‘lé9xf6 ‘i! al+ 32 ®d2 Ua5+ 33 $02 Egxg7 34 §xg7 flxg7 35 figl 1:0 From round 7: G. Kasparov-S. Pa| atnik Alekhine B04 I e4 5M6 2e5 @d53d4d64 @f3g6 5 RC4 3Db6 6 EJJ3 a5 7 a4 .9.g7 8 figs e61? A new idea, promisinga sharper struggle than the traditional 8 d5 9 f4 or90-00-0 10 Eel @0611 C3 f6 l2 ef ef I3 5z1e6 with better chances for White. 9 M de 10 fe c5 11 0-0?! 0-0?! Black did not take advantage of White’s inaccuracy: ll ¥xd4+! l2 Exdzt cd l3 EXW (l3 Qxf7 0-0 14 Qdo Exfl+ l5 éxfl . Qd7 l6 Qxb7 Qaél) l3 . Qxe5 14 Efl -’»Dc6 released Black from all his difficulties. More precise would have been 11 c3 cd 12 0-0! etc. 12 c3 5Dc6? Now White's initiative becomes menacing. It was necessary first to exchange on d4. After l2 ed 13 cd 5flc6 White could have continued 14 QB f6 15 @c3! fe l6 flgfi ‘; ’/e8 17 de 5Axe5 l8 5z)xe5 Exfl+ 19 ‘Mxfl . Qxe5 20 Eel with good play for the pawn. I3 @941 l¢1d7 13 cd l4 _Qg5 Ed7 leads to quick ruin: l5 5Df6+ . ¢.xf6 16 9.xf6 dc l7 gel. 14 .9.e3 5Ae7 15 9.g5! Black hopes to protect the weakened kingvside with his knight, but White’s reply forces further weaknesses. 15 . . . cd 16 cd h6 17 11:4 g5 18 . ¢.f2 The attempt to immediately destroy Black‘s position fails to a counterblow: 18 . fixg5‘l hg 19 Eh5 Qxe5! I8 . . . Qgé 19 0Jbc3 E07 20 £ic2 b6 21 9.e3 9.a6 22 Ef2 5Dh8 (3 / ’¢ fly ¢. .., W/ /W ' Preparations for this move by I7-f5 would have facilitated Black‘s defence. 23 . QxgS! The beginning of a decisive attack. 23 M! also seems good: 23 gh 24 ‘E'g4 f5 25 ef zaxro 26 Qxf6+ Hxfé 27 Exfo Efxfé 28 We-.4! fid8 29 ‘i! h7+ $f8 30 ~'5Db5 with a very strong attack. 23 . . . hg 24 Hhs f5 25 523xg5 EN! The most obstinate defence, since immediately losing are both 25 Efd8 26 §xf5! and 25 fifc8 26 Uh7+ $13 27 5z3xe6+. 26 ifsl! The sacrifice of a second bishop finally destroys the defence. 26 . . . Exfs After 26 ef 27 @d5 36:8 28 e6 Rfé 29 ‘Hh7+ @f8 30 e7+ is decisive. 27 Exfs ef 28 5DdS ‘i! ’e8 Top League Tap League. ’ 33 29. yh7+ éfx 30 ‘i! 'xfS+ t$g8 Or 30 5Bf7 3l @e6+ ®g8 32 Ego 31 Hh7+ $13 32 E33! 32 52)c7 also wins, but I wanted to conclude such a game with a direct attack. 32 . . . §c8 On 32 Ugé there could have followed 33 Ef3+ $§e8 34 ‘Ei’g8+ -5t3f8 35 Exf8+! .Qxf8 36 @f6+, or 34 9J8 35 5Dc7+ ®d8 (35 $67 36 fit’/ +!) 36 51]ce6-+- $67 (36 $58 37 Exf8+) 37 Uxgo 5Dxg6 38 §f7+ ®e8 39 Q3127-l‘ $d8 40 lDge6+ $c8 41 53x38 etc. 33 313+ 3Df6 33 -‘M7 34 fixf7+ iHxf7 35 QXI7 Ecl+ 36 fit? Efl+ 37 ®g3 Exf7 also leads to material loss after 38 Wh4l 34 1.3: Ugé 35 Exf6+ Slxffi 36 -5De6+ $’e8 37 5Dxf6+ 1:0 A 15-year old young man could find his emergence into the Top League, the final tournament of the championship of the world's strongest country, a daunting task. He was to face seventeen international title-holders — sixteen of them grandmasters. One had to strike a balance between awe and confidence. There were three specific targets in the Top League. Naturally to be first was one; another was that the first nine players would have places in the following (47th) Top League. If that became impossible there was a need to avoid ending in the bottom three positions as these would be cast back into the next Otborochnii and at least to stay in the First League. Gary started with solid draws against Geller, Bagirov (perhaps a missed chance there) and Makarichev. Wins over Polugayevsky and Kuzmin in rounds four and six aroused dreams. But the next three rounds constituted a bad patch — losses to Timoshchenko and
  21. 21. 34 Top League! Razuvayev. The need to battle to survive had the effect on Gary ofgiving a natural rein to his talents and abilities: a win over Belyavsky (only conceded at an adjournment session after round 14), a hard draw with Gulko, and then a miscalculated combination v. Mikhalchishin leading to a forlorn struggle ending on move 86. Played in round 4: G. Kasparov-L. Po| ugayevsky Sicilian, Paulsen B43 1e4c52 5af3e63d4cd4£Dxd4a6 5 QCS EC7 6 . Qe2 b5 7 R13 RM 8 0-0 -‘5Dc6 9 lDxc6 dc Polugayevsky rarely plays the Paulsen system, but he had specially prepared the variation for his game with Kasparov. A little- investigated position has been reached. Garik is not perturbed and unleashes his own novelty. It is true that it turns out to be defective, but in the end the boldness of the youth pays off. 10 e5?! More solid is 10 a4. 10 . . . Hxe5 11 He] QC7 12 £115 £97! 13 Exe6 g6! 14 Eel Eds? The experienced grandmaster commits an error. He should accept the sacrifice, as after 14 gh 15 9.g5 c5 White is hard put to demonstrate its correctness. 15 W3 C5 16 . Ql'4! @136 17 ‘E’g3 gh 18 9.c7 Worse is 18 E’g7? because of 18 tags 19 Exe7+ am: 20 Wxh8+ é7d7 with an advantage for Black. 18 . . . E26 19 . ¢Lxd8 Exg3 20 hg ®xd8 2| Eadl+ ®c7 22 5Dd5+ . ¢.xd5 23 Exds I16 24 Exhs fih7 A dynamically equal position has been reached. The game should, in all probability, end peacefully in a draw, but Polugayevsky tries for the win and commits an inaccuracy. 25 Ehes $d7 26 E593 Eg7 27 fid3+ ®c7 28 E23 Egé 29 EF3 9J6?! (31) ‘ %/ %-S% ’/ V/ W’/ / 3 c3! @d7 31 Ed3+ $07 32 E28 5297 Finally the knight enters the game, but at an inopportune time. Better was 32 _Q. e7. 33 Eeds t21c6 34 E8d7+ ébé 35 §xf7 . @.e7 36 E93 .9.d6 37 f4 c4 38 ®h2 . Q.c5 39 §e2 b4 40 §e4 be 4| be 212 42 fixc4 . Q.xg3 43 ®h3 Rel 44 a4! Q35 45 §b4+ $05? A blunder. but even after 45 @c6 46 E5 9.xc3 47 Exa5 Black would be unable to avoid losing. 46 35+ 1:0 This was Kasparov’s first win against one of the strongest players in the world. At Bugojno, four years later, he recalled with fondness this encounter, and even Polugayevsky smiled. From round 6: G. Kasparov-G. l(uzmin Spanish C97 1 e4 e5 2 -5M3 5Dc6 3 . @.b5 2164 9.214 %f6 5 0-0 fi. e76 fie] b5 7 9.b3 d6 8 (:3 0-0 9 I13 Q2510 . Qc2 (:5 11 d4 UC7 12 d5 5Dc4'. ’ 13 a4! 9.67 14 b3 Qa5 15 ab ab 16 5Dl)d2 @b7 17 .9.b2 g6 18 c4 Qh5 19 ch . QxbS 20 QC4 f6 21 Ed2 EH18 22 9.03 . @.f8 23 zahz 5z3t‘4 24 5Dg4 ig7 25 h4 Wes 26 / »Dge3 . @.xc4 27 be jihfi 28 Exa8 Exa8 (32) . ,ay aga W%m% %A 29 id]! At last the ‘Spanish' bishop re- enters the game. The black knight on f4 becomes an object ofattack. 29 . . . §a3 Top League! 35 30 g3 3Ah5 31 ‘QM was 32 §. xh5 fixe3 The white knight must not be allowed to reach f5! 33 fixe3 gh 34 Wgl @118 The attempt by this knight to re-enter the game ends in sorrow. 35 Be2 lDf7 36 Wxh5 E36? 37 EB! HID7 37 QXC4? is not on because of 38 Qg4+ $h8 39 fixf6! or 38 @f8 39 36:84’ ®g7 40 95! E37 41 Hxf6+ ®g8 42 . Qd2 Exe4 43 ihé Hg() 44 Hd8+ 52)xd8 45 Ef8 mate. 38 l! !g4+ M8 39 ES We7 40 Exh7 E34 41 .9.d2 1:0 From round 13: G. Kasparov-l. Dorfman Spanish C92 1 e4 e5 2 QB 5Dc6 3 §. b5 a64 9.24 QT6 5 0-0 . ¢.e7 6 Eel b5 7 RIJ3 d6 8 c3 0-0 9 h3 RII7 10 d4 E6811 4Dbd2 9.f8 12 a4?! (12 RC2) 12 h6! (I2 Qbtl? l3 ab ab 14 fixa8 9.xa8 15 de de 16 . Qxf7+ ®xl‘7 l7 Hb3+ $e7 18 3213+ iii) 13 d5 @b8 14 c4 c6 15 ah ab 16 flxafl fi. xa8 l7 dc b4 (17 be 18 5Axc4 ixcfv 19 9.214 about equal) 18 . @.a4 taxes 19 an unis 2o g4l? (20 tags g6 intending §c8 with a small advantage to Black) 20 EC8 21 Qg3 5Dd8 22 g5 hg 23 3flxg5 EXC4? (23 . .._ 03:6 24 é3xe6 fe 25 ¢Dh5 EC7! ? ) 24 QJJ3 HIM? (24 EC7 25 5z3h5 IBh7! oo) 25 ECZ (25
  22. 22. 36 Top League! Ef3!'? ) 25 lDd7! 26 9.93 @c5 27 .9.xd4 ed 28 . @.d5 .9.e7 29 h4 Qdeé (29 ixg5 30 hg 5Ade6 31 g6 fg 32 . Q.xe6+ Qxefi 33 $04 gel? 34 §xb4 i) 30 . Qxe6 fe 31 E04 d3? (33) (31 d5) ; / % .7. l Ue4! 9.c5 36 $xe6+ ®h8 37 ®g2 E14 38 Hc8+ ®h7 39 Exes 1:0 46Ih USSR Ch (Tap League), 'Il. 'zI'Iisi 2-27.12.78 I 3 J 4 5 6 7 X 9 0 I 2 .7 4 5 6 7 8 I M. 'I'aI 2625 '7: ~ : I ‘ 7, ‘7: I I I II 2 V. TsesIIItovsky 2550 vr '9 I ‘ 0 1 I ‘/1 I ‘/1 II 3 l, .Polugayevsk_v 2620 / » , K» » » ‘7'~ V; ‘/5 I I ll) 4 T. Georgadze Z535 « I ': 7 " ‘7': 9‘/ : S O. RomanisIIin 2610 V: I 1 0 9 6 E. GeIIer 2590 : ‘n’: I ‘ '~ I 9 7 A. Bt-Iyavslty 2530 ~ 0 3 I 9 I3 E. Sveshni| u)v 2565 ~ ‘/2 '/ v '/ z 9 9 G. Kasparov — 0 . ~ I I 8‘/ : I0 V. B2girov 2505 ; ‘~ '71- I 8 II S. MakaricI| ev 2495 / - 8 I2 G. TimosI| cIIenko 2530 8 I3 B. Gu| ko 2565 8 I4 Y. Razuvnyev 2465 7‘/ » I5 A. MikhaIcIiishin 2460 , / /1 7', : I6 V. Tukmalmv 2570 . '» 7‘/ ~ I7 I. l)urfman 2550 7‘ V; » , _ I 6!! - 18 G. Kuzmin 2560 ~ 1- ~ 0 9 6 Gary’s 9th place meant he was in with this class of player for at least another year. He had consolidated his gains of 1978. “He is an astonishingly talented junior. The result of his first performance in the Top League is an outstanding sporting achievement. It is reasonable to assume that Garik will make further big progress. " Thus summed up Tal in an interview. Tap League! 37
  23. 23. 6 Banja Luka — First Leg AGE international grandmasters. His Minus even a FIDE rating Gary was given the opportunity to play in this Yugoslav event in a field 16 of sixteen in which fourteen players were very good remarkable performance here should forever enshrine the tournament among the epics of chess. Banja Iu/ <0, I. !.4 ~ 2.5. 79 (J / 3 .1’ 4 5 6 I (i. I(asparnv '7’: I I 1 I I II‘/ z 2 U. /ndL-rsson '7‘ / ~ I I I l ‘ i 9|/ ; '4 . l.Smej| tal I I ‘L I ‘/7 I I 9'/ z 4 T. Pctrosian ‘/7 ‘~ "~ "7 I I : 9 5 A. Adorjan , I iv . - ' ‘,7 I 8'/ ; 6 M. I'neLevic' ’- I ‘ ’- ' » l 8 7 A. ./ lalanovié ‘7/: ‘7" ‘ ' ‘ ‘ ‘é 7‘/ z 8 W. IIrowne 2540 0 ‘,7 / - 0 I '4 , ,~ la 7‘/1 9 F. .I3ukié 2495 0 0 '~ ‘~ ‘~ I H M ‘7; 7 10 (ini| .(‘arcia 2490 17, 77, . a 1 ‘,7 0 0 is 1 6V; ll M. Vuk| t 2485 0 ‘7: - 0 s ‘,4 1 l7" ‘7_ I 6'/1 I2 D. Maroié 2470 0 0 . i7, i. a la ‘/7 ‘» V. 6'/ ; I3 S. Marja nnvié 2505 0 0 I II ‘x n I ‘~ I 6'/ ; I4 B. Kurajiea 2515 ‘/3 0 7 I ‘» '7» I) 1 '~ ‘7 6 I5 R. IIernandeL 2500 0 ‘- 7 ‘~ 7'- ‘.7 "7 - u ‘,7 6 I6 M. SiIian. -vié 2355 0 ‘7 ~ 0 0 ‘7 0 i M o -I Gary's progress: round I - 7 " ‘— draw with Perosian: 2 - beat -~_ «v 4. . Sibarevtc (local master): 3 - beat . 7.. .» Browne; 4 - beat Hcrnandc7; 5 - bluish - _, _.-/ ‘.4 . , . . . . beat Marovic; (7 - drcw with -/ ) Smcjkal; 7 beat Marjanovié; X - '- hcut Kneievic; 9 - beat Bukié; ”""l'~‘. I"l<“ , 10- heat Vukié (9 points v already liclgr: uli- an International Master normll; ,; ugnJnU. ll— drew with Andersson: I2-drew ‘, .Sur: i|c7o with Matanovic (already sure of first place); 13 ~ drew with Garcia (an International Grandmaster normll); I4 - drew with Kurajica; 15 drew with Adorjan to finish 2 points ahead of the next. is there such a precedent in chess history? Robert J Fischer at Zurich 1959 (3rd to Tal)? Boris Spassky at Bucharest 1953‘! Both were 16. Played in round 3: G. Kasparov-W. Browne Queen's Indian E12 ld4 l'43f62c4e63 Q]f3b64a3c5 5 d5 9.261? 6 HCZ cd (6 ‘l5e7!‘? ) 7 ed 116 (More exact move order is 7 g6 8 5Dc3 . §.g7 9g3()-() 10 . ¢.g2 d6.) 8 5Ec3 5zbd7'! ! 9 .9.f4! 9.e7 10 g3 0-0 11 . Qg2 E0812 0-0 Qh5'. ’l (12 b5 is met by 13 b4l; I2 flf8!'. l) I3 _Qd2 f3Dhf6 I4 Efcl its 15 2141 (Preparing 93b5, ic3, e4. f4 and eventually c5.) 15 5Dg4 16 5Db5 . Qb717 e4 a6 18 523213 Ebs 19 h3 @5516 If 19 ages 20 am! 20 .9423 A fantastic line is 20 5?c4 b5 21 ab ab 22 53-715 Who 23 5Dc(> _€i. xc6 24 9.215 ! Vb7 25 do yxco 26 e5 de 27 5Axe5 HCB 28 Qc6 fixe-1+ 29 fixcl mix 30 tabs b4('! ) 3: maxi: Exa5 32 Hxf7+ @h8 33 Ee8!l 51xe8 (if33 hf: 34 Web! Qxetl 35 5517+ 9i9h7 36 . Q.c4+ and males) 34 .9415 Qdfé 35 ‘E4/gX+ with smothered mate to follow. But the whole Variation has to be discarded because of 30 ‘lillaol. 20 . . . ‘£967 21 5zd2 9.08 22 if] Holding up b5 and c4. Normal play for Black is to battle Banja Luka — Firs! Leg 39 . to hold up White‘s e5. Browne seeks complications. 22 . . . g5?! lf22 @e5 23 f4 ~’«Ded7 24 Ed3 planning @113. Ee3, Eael, e5 strategically winning, 23 QB h6 24 -91c4 White has the advantage through the possibility ofe5 and because of Black's weakened kingside. 24 . . . b5 25 ab ab 26 e5! «’»Dxd5l? (If 26 be 27 efor 26 de 27 5Dcxe5 5flxd5 28 -'/ Dxf7l. ) 27 ®xd6 .9.xd6 28 ed ‘Eds 29 Q95! (N14! (If 29 @xc3 30 QC6.) 30 Bdl Qxe5 31 fixe5 fixe5 32 fixe5 (ECG 33 l¥e3 t'»Dxe5 33 f6 34 . Qxf(>! 34 ‘l§’xe5 c4 35 9.g2 ieti Though material is level and Black has good queenside pawns, the issue is decided by White's more active pieces and Black‘s kingside weaknesses. 36 Jam b4 (34) W ll'37 ‘llllhfa 38 Ee7. % %8 . / / / .7 37 9.04! C3 38 . ¢.h7+! <. ’?Jxh7 39 19x06 1:0
  24. 24. 40 Banja Luka — First Leg G. Kasparov-D. Marovit': QGD Orthodox D6] lc4 e62 5z1f3d53d4 Qf64 5Zte3 §. e7 5 Jigs 0-0 6 e3 £z)bd7 7 Ec2 c5 This is considered the best reply. On 7 c6. 8 Ed] proves unpleasant, as it will be difficult to achieve the advance e6-e5. 8 0-0-0 It is well known that 8 cd achieves nothing in view of 8 5flxd5 9 fixe7 Exe7 l0 9.d3 g6 11 do l’/ Axc5 12 Ecl 3Dxd3+ as in the Alekhine-Capablanca match, 1927. 8 . . . @215 9 Qbl h6'. ’! One can hardly recommend this move, which weakens the position of his king. 9 cd 10 ed dc seems more natural, eg. 11 _fi. xc4 é3b6 12 flb3 id? with complicated play. 10 Ml? dc It is risky to accept the piece sacrifice. After 10 cd lled hg l2 hg @e4 13 Qxe4 de 14 c5 White has a dangerous initiative. ll 9.xc4 5Db6'. ‘! It is already too late for 11 cd. After 12 ed -’/ Db6 13 9.b3 . Qd7 14 @e5 §ac8 15 Eh3! White has the advantage. 12 . Qxf6! gt" On 12 flxfé l3 5De4 is rather unpleasant, for example 13 cd I4 Qxf6+ gf l5 Exd4 @xc4 l6 flg4+l @h8 17 Hxc4e5 18 5Dg5!fg 19 hg e4 20 ECS WM 21 a3! with a decisive attack. 13 9.e2 cd 14 ed 9.d7 Black‘s position seems to be in danger, but if White acts slowly, Black will create counter-play on the queenside. 15 fih3 121244 16 Eg3+ ens I7 ‘gdl 0Jxc3+ I8 be @h7 At first I thought that Marovic would attempt to play 18 ¥f5+. In this case the simple 19 $132 §g8 20 Exh6+ ‘QM 21 EM, however, would retain the White advantage with a material bonus. [9 . fid3+ f5 20 AZ: -5 fi. b5 (35) This is the only defence to 21 Qg4. It seems that Black has turned aside all meaningful threats but the following move clarifies the situation. 2 , ,. I.%e %7 ‘W / _ 2 2 . 2% 21 fif3! lg/ Iy strgngest move ofthe game, an per aps of all 15 of my tournament encounters. It creates a horrible threat of g2-g4. 21 . . . f6 2l 9.f6 does‘t work because of 22 g4 . Qxe5 23 gf! .Qxd3+ 24 ‘E’xd3 §ad8 25 f6+! ®h8 26 l§e3 with an inescapable mate. The direct method of discouraging g2—g4 also meets with a strong tactical refutation, for example: 21.Q. xd3+ 22 ‘¥xd3 h5 23 g4! hg 24 Exffi! flb6+! 25 ®e2 ef 26 yxr5+ $h6 27 Egll with no comfortable defence against 28 £Dxg4+. 22 @c4 EC7 The problems ofthe defence are not solved by 22 Hat» because of 23 ‘¥e2 and the multiple threats (d5, _¢. xt'5+, Ue3) cannot be repulsed by Black. 23 Bel .9.xe4 On 23 ‘@d7 24 d5! is best of all. 24 . @.xc4 e5 25 Exfs Marovié defended brilliantly in time trouble, however, and came close to taking the half-point. 25 . . . 9.23 26 Q94 ®h8 27 §h5 Wh7 28 Bxh7+ The simplest path to the goal was 28 fid3 Exezt 29 . @.xe4 $g7 30 de fe 3] fid7+ fit’! 32 §xl7+ ®xf7 33 fixhfi with an easy win. 28 . . . ®xh7 29 de @g6 30 g4 fe 31 Ed7? A mistake, which should have cost me a half-point. The simple 31 fixe5 would have won without any real difficulty. For example: 31 fixf2 32 Ee6+ $g7 (If 32 Efé, then 33 h5+) 33 fid7+ @f8 34 fixhé. The move in the game. which creates the threat of id}. also looks reasonable, but Marovié finds an excellent reply . . . Banja Luka ~ First Leg 4] 3] . . . §ae8l Bringing his last piece into the battle and defending against the threatened 32 id3+. Thinking for more than 20 minutes, I was amazed to find that a direct win was nowhere to be seen and decided to play on my opponents time pressure. 32 §xb7 Exf2 33 §xa7 Now Black has a lot of checks, but the draw can only be obtained by a quiet move — 33 Ed8!. In this case White can either force a draw by perpetual check, or carry on the struggle. After 34 . @.f7+ Exf7 35 Exa3 fif2 36 Eel with an objectively drawn position. But Black would still face many difficult obstacles. This is well demonstrated by the following variation: 36 Edd2 37 Exe5 Ec2+ 38 Qbl fib2+ 39 éal! Ebd2 40 §a6+ $g7 41 §a7+ ®f6 42 Ef5+ fixf5 43 Ea6+, winning. All the same, I think that if Black plays accurately he has drawing chances, but Marovic now made a mistake, and as a result the ‘psychological’ ploy turned out to be effective. 33 . . . 9J8 34 §a6+ ®h7 35 Efs Here Black overstepped the time limit. but it is easy to see that his position is hopeless. The game taught me a good lesson. I learnt how one hasty move can be costly. But all‘s well that ends well.
  25. 25. 7 47th Championship AGE 16 G. Kasparov appeared for the first time on a FIDE rating list, the 1.7.79 supplementary list. with 2545. Spartakiad, July 1979 Gary Kasparov played board 2 for the Azerbaidzhan team, behind Grandmaster Bagirov and ahead of Masters Magerramov, Korsunsky . . . in the Spartakiad (USSR internal Olympic Games) held at Moscow. In the preliminary section Gary mct: Round 1: A. Gips| is (b) Latvia (2500) 1/3.23 2: bye 3: A. Veingold (w) Estonia 2450 0.41 4: I. .Polugayevsky (b) RSFSR 2635 1.37 5: O. Averkin (w) Moldavia 2435 ', /3.44 With only 14 points from 36 the Azerbaidzhanis were placed in the third final section fighting for overall places 13-17. Gary‘s results in this final: Round 1: bye 2: A.1(udryashov (w) Turkmcnia (—) 1.58 3: E. Mnatsakanian (h) Armenia 2425 1.33 4: M. Govbinder (w) Tadzhikslan (-) '/1.42 41 5: A. Butnoris (b) Lithuania (2410) l. The Ukraine Republic team won the Spartakiad. Azerbaidzhan finished overall 13th. Gary's personal score was 4 wins, 3 draws and 1 loss. Played in the preliminaries: G. Kasparov-L. Po1ugayevsky Sicilian B30 1e4c52%13d63d4cd45Dxd4 ‘M6 5 @c3 e6 6 fie3 a6 7 g4 ! Dc6 8 g5 Q)d7 9 Egl R97 10 h4 0-0 11 h5 White has clearly demonstrated his predeliction for a sharp struggle. But it is not easy to create real threats against the black king, even if his army approaches the very gates of his opponent's fortress. 1] . . . 'Zlde5 12 Qxc6 Etxcfi 13 f4 b5 14 H13 Probably an inaccuracy. More interesting is 14 .9.d3 and on 14 ib7 15 flg4l. If 14 b4. however, then possibly even 15 lAd5l? ed 16 ed 321517 17 EB and White's attack can become very dangerous. 14 . . . £117 15 . @.d3 5AM! Here, too. on 15 b4, 16 %d5! ed 17 ed $21718 E'e4 g6 19 hg hg 20 0-0-0 is tempting. 16 f5 ef 17 ems 19lxd3+ 18 cd @c8! 19 M5! E68! (36) On 19 g6. 20 5Dd5! is good. Polugayevsky plays very convin- cingly and it is no longer proper to speak of White's advantage. In fact White must be accurate, in order not to fall into a worse p0Slt10n. 47 (I1 Championship 43 2| ef . Q.Xg5 22 Exg5 §xe3+ 23 @d2 E13 24 I2)c4 9.xe4 25 de Ee8'. ’l After 25 ft: 26 §h5 Ea7 27 Eel the game would have ended in a draw. Falling into time- pressure. Polugayevsky ruins his position with this and the following YHDVCS. 26 EC] 115?! 27 e5! 116 28 Eh5 The curious “sacrifice" of a rook by 28 f6 leads to an immediate draw: 28 §f2+ 29 ads E134- as the king cannot go to either the c-file or the e-file (because of fixfé). or to d4 (30 $d4? hg 31 Eh] §f4+ and §h4). 28 . .. Exes? (37) an % A A, as
  26. 26. 44 47th Championship Directly into the awaiting net! He had to play 28 $xg7 29 Zgl+ é7h7 30 f6 §g8. after which 31 Exh6+ would have given White the better endgame. 29 f6! An effective winning stroke! 29 . . . Ef2+ 30 $d3 Ef3+ 3] @d4 Ee4+ 32 @xd5 Ee8 33 EXI16 §f5+ 34 ®d4 §l'4+ 35 ECS Ee5+ 36 @b6 Ee6+ 37 EC6 1:0 Played round 5 of the finals: G. Kasparov-A. Butnoris Bogo-Indian E11 1 d4 @f6 2 c4 e6 3 @f3 .9.l)4+ 4 5Dbd2 0-0 5 e3 b6 6 . fi.€l3 9.b7 7 0-0 d5 8 33 9.xd2 9 . Qxd2 (9 43)xd2!? ) 9 5Dbd7 10 cd 9.xd5(l0 ed ll b4 : ) 11 b4 c512 §cll cd (12 . Qxf3 l3 @xf3 cd 14 ed :7/1') 13 @xd4 523e5 I4 9.236 (l4 9&2?! [£164 15 fiel "43d6! “-) 14 5De4 15 9.21 @g5? (15 5Dd6 I6 ‘lQe2 : )16f4.' Hgé 17 fe é3c5 18 ig3 5Z)xa6 (38) Top League, 47th (Not 18 an-.4 as 19 E62 I'4lxa6 20 EM Hxe5 21 Eg4 wins. ) / /V %7 / /'W% 4 , / ¢ 2 19 Q5! i 3208 20 @d6 E07 21 EM lI5 22 G4 9.28 23 . Q.h4 EC” 24 E63 whfi (If 24 51107 25 fig} Hh7 26 Eg5 g6 27 ‘Hail wins. ) 25 E“ QC7 26 305! E f5 27 El EXd6 (Or 27 e5 28 $041+ @117 29 fig ef 30 {Di}! Edi-F 31 Ell ii) 23 f7+ QII7 29 $.97 e5 30 Exit} ef 31 flxdé ‘QXd6 32 3113 ‘Q87 33 WC4 @h6 34 Exf4 (34 f8‘l¥! ‘QXIB 35 ‘QXC7 g5 36 §d3) 34 Q96 35 ‘E08 ydfi 36 WlI8+ $g6 37 f85.+ I23xf8 38 E’xl‘8 Edl+ 39 ‘é? f2 l!5’d2+ 40 @333 Eel+ 41 EM 1:0. One has to be impressed by the inexorable progress that characterises Kasparov's career. Gary confounds those of us who chartjunior's overall rise as a burst upward followed by a plateau of consolidation, followed by a new thrust, new plateau and so on. Gary continually progresses. For him to stand still would be to fail. In the Top League (final tournament) of the 47th USSR individual championship held in Minsk, November 29 — December 27 1979, Gary received the third place bronze medal. He had been 9th in the previous event (Chapter 5). At the start of the Minsk event his expected score (based purely on his Soviet rating of 2510 — 36 below the championship average) was 7.6 points. So Kasparov made 2.4 points extra. Gary beat Tamaz Georgadze in round one. Commentator Salo Flohr found the game puzzling. No sacrifices. Kasparov played at Karpov, as Petrasiari. But very effectively. In round 2 another masterly positional 47th Championship 45 win as Black against 2 c3 v. Sicilian specialist, Evgeny Sveshnikov. A very disciplined version of Kasparovl? Then in round three, this: G. Kasparov-A. Yusupov Spanish C30 l e4 e5 2 5M3 @c6 3 . &b5 a64 ia4 [N6 5 0-0 5Axe4 6 d4 I15 7 9.b3 d5 8 de . @.e6 9 .9.e3 A little investigated continuation which is not at all bad. 9 5ZJa5 was considered to be a sufficient response, but in Kupreichik- Slutsky, USSR l979, White had an advantage after the simple l0 1¢)d4 Ed7 ll flel 5Dxb3 12 ab 9.67 13 b4. 9 . . . .fie7 10 5Dbd2 0-0 11 C3 Inoffensive is 11 £'43xe4 de 12 fixeo fe 13 51)d2 HIJ5 14 ‘§’g4 3Axe5 15 Wxett §ad8. Besides, in this variation Black has the inter- esting possiblity 12 ef. eg. 13 . id5 Qxei or 13 Qd5 %b4 14 Uxd8 Eaxd8 l5 .9.b3 C5. 11 . . . .tl. g4 In my opinion, more promising was 11 @xd2 l2 Wxd2 E’d7. 12 5Axe4 de 13 @d5l ef In the endgame arising after 13 flxd5 14 9.xd5 ef I5 fixcé fg 16 évxgz fiad8 17 a4, White has a clear advantage. This was already demonstrated in a game from the Alekhine-Teichman match, in Berlin 1921! 14 Exes fg 15 9xg2 $d7 16 flhél (39) 17 f3 h5? Black defends unsuccessfully. Unsuitable was 17 @h8 I8 fg fig8 l9 h3 h5 20 Exf7 hg 2l ¥e4!. but better was 17 . fic5+ 18 éhl Eae8. 18 Hadl ‘Uf5 19 fg Exes 19 Qxgzt 20 §d7 leads to a difficult ending. Taking on e5 leaves Black with the hope of equalizing the game in the event of the tiniest inaccuracy by White. Thus 20 Ext7 $h8! yields nothing, or 20 E15 Hail-F 2l fihl §ad8 22 Edfl @h8. 20 idel! Uc5+ 21 Qhl Ead8'. ’ This loses a piece, but is very difficult to point out any kind of useful continuation for Black. After 21 fiae8 22 fif5 Ede 23 Exf7 Ext‘! 24 gh+ sé7f8 25 fig] . é.h4! 26 wgs+ ®e7 27 lyxr/ + ®d8 28 Ed] §el+ Black has good drawing chances. Stronger is 23 gh+ ®h8 24 fixf7 Exf7 25 . iixf7
  27. 27. 46 47th Championship §f8 26 fig] with an unstoppable . ¢.b3 E15 31 ®g2 a5 attack. White also has a decisive 32 Exf7 attack after 21 _Q. h4 22 §f5 ‘Bd6 The simplest method of breaking 23 Eefl. up Black‘s tightening resistance. 22 §f5 @116 32 . . . EXIV 23 fid5 Egfi 24 Exe7 Exd5 25 33 ®g3 a4 34 9.xI7+ $xI7 35 @h4 . ¢.xd5 llg 26 ‘$e4 Exes! 27 fixe4 égfi 36 b3 a3 37 c4 be 38 be ®f5 39 Ed8 28 §xc7 h5 29 _Qc2 Bd5 30 ®xh5 ®e4 40 ®xg4 $d4 4] h4 1:0 Six successive draws came from rounds 4-9. Next in round 10 Gary blundered away what should have been a decisive advantage and lost to Konstantin Lerner; then he survived pressure to beat Rafael Vaganian, one of the Soviet Union's most talented grandmasters. Gary was then shaken by a loss first to Yuri Anikayev through an impulsive move, followed by a further one to Aleksander Belyavsky by a good position going sour. He pulled himself together to finish with wins over Viktor Kupreichik and the 1978 Junior World Champion, Sergei Dolmatov, and draws with Yuri Balashov and Mikhail Tal. Gary had scored four wins, six draws and only one loss against the eleven grandmasters in the event. 47/h USSR Ch {Tap imagur). Minsk 29.]/ .-J7./3.79 I 2 3 4 5 6 S 9 (I 3 4 5 It 7 N I E. Ge| ler 2550 0 1‘: ’~ ‘.1 '~ ‘I: ‘/2 “z I I ~ I '/ ~ ‘n: ‘H: I I II'/ ; 2 A. Yusnpov 2440 ‘~ t ‘» 0 I I I L ‘: : I ‘/3 I I ‘5 0 101/; 3 Y. Ba| aslIm 2600 “- ‘E 0 ‘: ‘r ‘~ ‘. ‘~ ‘. '- '. ~ I ‘V: ': ‘z I I I0 4 G. Kasparov 2545 ‘x I ": 0 I I ‘~ I 0 0 : ‘.9 I '. ~ I 0 ‘.9 I0 5 T. Georgadze 2535 "v 0 ": 0 n I ‘: I '/ ~ 0 v 0 I I ‘~ ‘~ I 9'/ ; 6 V. KupreiclIik 2540 "3 0 ‘I 0 0 t 0 I I ‘.2 I ‘; ‘J; 0 I I 9V; 7 S. Makarielrev 2500 ‘V ‘» ‘» ‘v "1 I it 0 I 0 1» ‘~ I ‘z- ‘, ~ ‘/ _- I 91/; 8 R. Vaganian 2570 ‘Q 0 ‘. v 0 0 0 I t I ‘/ ~ , I ‘H I I I ‘» 9 9 K. I.erner 2475 0 ‘v ‘v I ‘g 0 0 0 a I ; ‘.4 I ‘. «. 1 i. . I” 31/: I0 A. Belyavsky 2595 0 '« I I ‘; I l 0 t 0 0 0 I I ‘I 8 II Y. Razuvayev 2470 0 ‘ ‘~ ‘. ~ 0 0 “v I '~ V: : '/ _~ I ‘iv ‘/ ~ ‘/ ~ '. '- II 12 N. Rashkavsk_v 2500 '- ‘- ‘. - ‘~ ". - 0 "~ _ ‘» I . - I ‘‘. ~ 0 ‘~ ‘v / ‘ '/ x 8 I3 0.Romanishin 2560 0 0 0 ‘. ,» I 0 ‘. ~ 0 ‘/ _~ I ‘.9 '— a I I ‘/ ~ 0 I 8 I-1 S. Do| maIt» 2495 ‘ ‘. ~ ‘~ 0 0 ’; 0 l’: 0 I 0 I 0 o ‘_» I I ‘ 7'/1 I5 M. TaI 2615 ‘V 0 ‘. » 0 ‘» ‘.9 0 ‘V; I ‘A ~ 0 ‘.3 n 0 I I 7'/ ; I6 I’. .Svcshnikov 2545 ‘. _~ 0 _~ 0 ‘~ I ‘w» I) 0 0 ‘ "z 0 I a I ‘I 7 I7 Y. Aniltayev 2455 0 ‘/ ~ 0 I ', v 0 ‘. ~ 0 ‘. ’« 0 ‘/ ~ ~ I 0 0 0 w ‘ 5'/ ; I8 V. TsE§IIl(0IrSl<) 2560 0 I 0 "» 0 0 I) ‘v — ‘~ ‘~ ‘~ 0 '4 0 ‘» ‘it n 5|/1 Skara Teams 8 Rating 1.1.80: Kasparov 2595 (Karpov 2725) AGE Gary I(asparov's score (91.6%) and quality of play, when he played for the first timein a full USSR 16 team (of 8 players, 2 reserves) as second reserve — in the final ofthe European Team Championship at Skara, Sweden, January 1980 - helped lift his team to a clear cut victory (USSR 36’/2-19'/3, Hungary 29, England 28'/2, Yugoslavia 28, Bulgaria 27'/ ;, Czecho- slovakia 26, 1srael25 and Sweden 23 V3) despite some surprisingly lack- lustre performances within the team (Karpov +0=4-I, Tal +0=4—l, Petrosian +0=5—0, Polugayevsky +3=3—0, Geller +2=4—0, Balashov +2=4—0, Romanishin +3=2—l, Vaganian +3'=3-0, Yusupov +3:l—0 and Kasparov +5=l—0). Gary's details: Round 1 S. Webb (w) ENG 2425 I 2 . I.Pinter (b) HUN 2535 ‘/3 3 N. G.Renman (w) SVE 2425 1 4 N. Spiridonov (w) BLG 2470 I 5 J. Pribyl (b) CZE 2395 I 6 did not play 7 M. Vukit': (b) JUG 2460 I N. Spiridonov-G. Kasparov is about equal. Torre Attack v King's Indian A48 7 5Axd4 cd 1 QB g6 2 d4 5N6 3 9.g5 .9.g7 8 flxdxt 0-0 4 QIJIIZ e5 5 ixfé . Qxf6 9 c4! 6 £13.24 . e.xd4 II9 e3 one 10 I1!d2 as 11 Iacz 6 who 7 taxr6+ Iyxrs 8 e3 b6 e6! = =/7.
  28. 28. 48 Skara Teams 9 . . . 5£. c6 I0 9152 (I6 11 ‘AC3 Q66 I2 l34'. ’l Better is 12 e3. e. g. 12 a6 13 9.e2 ‘£115 14 0-0 fiab8 2/= . I2 . . . ‘§’b6l I3 Zdl'. ’l If I3 5Dd5 . §.xd5 14 ed -'? d4! 15 Edi e5 16 de Efe8! I7 ‘§’xd4 fixe6+ IX RC2 Eacéi I90-0 ‘§’. ‘<d4 20 Exd4 Exel +. Or I3 _§. e2 Q‘. d4 14 0-0 fiacfi or 14 ‘Hd4!'? . 13 . . . f91e5 I5 . ii. e2 If I5 ef Exf5 I6 ‘ydlll (16 I4? Eaf8l 1) I6 HXCI4 I7 §xd4 sane i. while the immediate 15 M can be met by 15 4g4, e. g. I6 h3‘? l He3+! I7 ‘lélxel «’4Nxe3 IX Ed} 51C2+ I9 ®d2 fc 20 5Axe4 . Qf5l T. I5 . . . f4 Not I5 fe’! l I6 QXC4 $.15 I7 @c3 9322!’! I8 ‘¥fxc2 ‘III’Xl2+ I9 <. *id2 I§7f4+ only drawing. I6 ®d5 . Q.xd5 I7 IIlIxd5+ ®g7 I8 0-0 Now Black, if White‘s efforts to liberate his bishop and penetrate with the rooks on the queenside can be contained, would have a clear advantage. Kasparov now suggested 18 %tf6! meeting 19 b4 with 19 fixbzt 20 Ebl 9:43 21 Exb7 §ab8! as the way - ed. I8 . . . fiactl? I9 I)4l HXIJ4 20 Eb] 35933 2I EXII7 $1761 22 h4l'. ’ h6l Not 22 Exa2'. ’ 23 . @.g4! 23 Kdl? Instead after 23 ‘I£'Id2 g5 24 §b3l ‘! I’c5 25 Zb5 Black has difficulty avoiding a draw. 23 . . . §h8! 24 E67 Efcli 25 EXC8 ZXCS 26 ‘QI77 ‘QCS 27 E’b2? (Already time- trouble. Better 27 Ebl 1.) 27 Wbfil 28 gel g5 29 Ed5 06! 30 hg+? l hg 31 Edl lf3I Ed2 EbS! E. 31 . . . ®c7 Even more effective is 31 Eh8 planning ‘$’c7-h7. 32 902? Somewhat better 32 ‘éfc3 but then still 32 §h8. 32 . . . Ebll 33 W34 g4 34 ¥Va3 ‘£¥c5 35 ‘gel g3 36 ET] gf+ 37 EXIZ fihll 38 flfl ‘IéIe3l 39 ‘Ilfxe3 fc 40 2Ic2 5/xc4I 0-I G. Kasparov-Pribyl Grilnfeld D85 Id-4 51f62c4g63 @c3d54cd @xd5 5 e4 I$xc3 6 be 9457 7 Q. )f3 b6?! Usually 7 c5 or 70-0 8 $02 C5 are played. 8 .9.b5+ c6 9 _Qc4 0-0 10 0-0 £26 11 . §.xa6 £Dxa6 12 ‘$24 Simpler, probably, is 12 9.g5 fld7 13 @d2 where the strong centre and unfortunate position of the 5Da6 secure an advantage for White. I2 . . . ECS 13 _Qg5 @b7 14 fife] e6 I5 Eahl c5 A natural and practically forced move. Indeed, I6c4 was threatened and on the preliminary I5 h6, I6 RC3 is unpleasant. 16 d5! If even one preparatory move, say 16 Eedl, then it is easy for Black to seize the initiative with 16 f5. 16 . . . .Qxc3 17 fled! ed 18 ed . Qg7 The strong passed pawn and the unfortunate placement of his opponent's pieces compensate White for the small material loss. It is not easy for Black to defend: if 18 QC7, then 19 . @.e7 fifes 20 Ud7, and on IS @b8 White has the choice between 19 EC4 . ii. g7 20 WXCS, regaining the pawn, and I9 Wh4 with an attack. 19 d6 f6 (41) White would have a pretty good position after 20 .9.f4, but I much preferred a more energetic and Interesting continuation. 20 Ml! _ fg Other possibilities: 20 Ead8 2! wc4+ ens 22 mesh fe(22 fg 23 5Df7+) 23 . Qxd8 fixd8 24 E66 Skara Teams 4 9 W . QM 21 Eb3+ ®h8 22 ®c5l! fe (22 fg 23 d8‘I§) 23 d8E' Iiaxdx 24 Zxd8 §xd8 25 9.xd8 with an obvious advantage for White in both cases. 21 ‘§c4+ @h8 22 -5Axg5 . Qf6 22 . Qd4 loses immediately because of 23 Exd4 cd 24 Exd4+ %Ilt7g8 25 Eco. 23 @e6 -’vDc7 Again forced. Bad is 23 5Db4 24 ‘EM Qco 25 5Dxf8 Exf8 26 (I89 "~Axd8 27 Exd8. 24 Qxfll EXIB 25 fidé The endgame after 25 flxc5 Exg2+ 26 ®xg2 be 27 Eb7 5De6 28 Edo Qf4+ 29 on . ¢.d8 30 Exa7 is clearly better for White, but I wanted more. 25 . . , .€Le7 (42) Black‘s difficulties are illustrated ' by the variations 25 Hbéé 26 Ebdl fidlfi 27 E56 9.g7 28 114, which is almost zugzwang. or 25 9.d8 26 M ‘£36 27 fl9c3+ @g8 28 Iéfcz (not letting out the queen) 28 . ¢.xh4 29 fixg6+! 26 (18%? ! . é.xd8 26 Exd8 loses: 27 fixd8+
  29. 29. 50 Skara Teams created Black's best chance was 30 iLg7 Jl H/ c7 ‘QXC7 32 EXC7 _lI. d4. although even here alter 33 Ell a6 (33 a5 34 a4) 34 Eco EH1 35 ZXI6 .9.xf6 36 Eel White should realize his advantage. Quite unexpectedly. Black gets mated! 30 . . . H36? 31 ‘EM! (4,? ) 1:0 1 E" / /8 . Qxd8 28 En tyds 29 was éaxds / 7% '3. 30 Edl. / * 27 E’ 3 Q 8 ’ ' / ' ' 29 you ®h8 / %/ %/ %/ 30 mt % 3% The forcing variation has eon- ’/ V/ / ’/ ’, cluded and White has regained his 8 '/ piece. In the position that has been 9 Baku — Second Leg AGE Gary duly gained his second and final norm for 17 the International Grandmaster title when the opportunity arose in the event organised by the USSR Central Chess Club in his home city, Baku. March 29 — April I8 I980. (FIDE grandmaster titles are awarded for appropriate scores according to the oppositi0n's strength in two or more category 7 or higher tournaments in which a total of at least 24 games are played. ) The average rating of 2487 made Baku I980 a category ten tournament which meant that the score needed for a grandmaster norm was It) points. As when making his first norm at Banja Luka 1979 (Chapter 6) Gary clearly over-fulfilled the title norm and left no doubts as to his rights to the title. Baku. 39,} « IX.4.WI 3 e 4 5 /1 " . t‘ 1/ ll / ‘ t 4 x r, I GiKasparoi 2595 - ‘ I I I I » I I I I II'/ ; 2 A Iielvatsky 2590 C I I I I I I I II 3 K ' 2475 II 0 0 I ‘ I I II'/ z 4 zsto - I I I I I~ 8'/ I 5 A IItIlaICIIi§I| ilI 2-I90 ‘ ‘ II ‘- I ‘ ‘ 0 I I 3'/1 6 I'. . Torre 2510 0 ‘ 0 0 ‘ O I I 0 I I I 0 I X 7 M. (‘IIiIIurdanitILL' 2400 0 ‘ ‘ - 0 V I ‘ I I II 3 I. (i. ‘0m Z5I0 0 0 I 0 I I II 9 . I.i. t»ci. tymt, 2450 0 0 I 0 I . I I I I 7-/ , I0 F. .Magerramo 2435 0 0 ‘ — 0 ‘ 0 ‘ I ‘ I I 7'/ ; II NtI>’ad£'It} Z-II5 0 ‘ ‘ ‘ 0 [I I ‘- ‘ 7 12 V. AntosIiin 2-680 0 I I 0 0 I a I I 0 10/, I3 I. ZaiIsI: 2490 0 ‘ 0 ‘ 0 0 t I ‘ 6 ‘4 l~Vo2t 2510 0 u I n I I 0 . I I 5 I5 S. Martinmit" 2475 0 0 0 0 I 0 ‘ I] 0 ~ 0 0 ‘ t I 4 I6 S. (iarcia 2450 0 0 0 ‘ 0 0 0 0 0 ‘ I ‘ 0 1 JV;

×