“all 5 genders must coexist for there to be universal harmony. If one of the genders is separated then the world will beco...
Gender in Nature<br />A note about language:<br /><ul><li>Language has limitations.
Most of the modern concepts around gender were not developed until the second half of the century so many terms do not tra...
For the purposes of this presentation I will use the term transgender
Transgender is “an umbrella term…uniting all those whose gender identity does not easily mesh with their gender assigned a...
Gender in Nature<br />Bullfrog<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nat...
Gender in Nature<br />Red spotted hyena<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expressi...
Gender in Nature<br />Hawaiian gecko<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression ...
Gender in Nature<br />Bear<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature,...
Gender in Nature<br />Clownfish<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Na...
Gender in Nature<br />Deer<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature,...
Gender in Nature<br />Red Kangaroo<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in...
Gender in Nature<br />White-throated sparrow<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Exp...
Gender in Nature<br />Garter Snake<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in...
Gender in Nature<br />Big Horn Sheep<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression ...
Gender in Nature<br />Butterfly<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Na...
Gender in Nature<br />Striped Dolphin<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression...
Gender in Nature<br />Hummingbird<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in ...
Gender in Nature<br />Bat<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, ...
Gender in Nature<br />Spider Monkey<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression i...
Gender in Nature<br />Sea Horse<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Na...
Gender in Nature<br />Snail<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature...
Gender in Nature<br />Beluga Whale<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in...
Gender Across Cultures<br />On nearly every continent, and for all of recorded history, thriving cultures have recognized,...
Gender Across Cultures<br />Lhamana/Two-spirit<br />Native American<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natur...
Gender Across Cultures<br />Hijra<br />India/Pakistan<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple G...
Gender Across Cultures<br />Fa’afafine<br />Samoa<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gende...
Gender Across Cultures<br />Muxe<br />Zapotec-Oaxaca,MX<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple...
Gender Across Cultures<br />Bissu<br />South Sulawesi-Indonesia<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: ...
Gender in History<br />Whether visible or not there have always been transgender people<br />in every color of the human r...
Gender in History<br />Albert Cashier<br />Ireland/United States<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural:...
Gender in History<br />Joan of Arc<br />France<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender E...
Gender in History<br />Dr. Alan Hart<br />United States<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple...
Gender in History<br />Big Mama Thorton<br />United States<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multi...
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It's Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible

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Much of the information presented in this slide show is from the Gender Now Coloring Book and the Gender Now Activity Book: School Edition published by Reflection Press. The goal of the slide show is to provide examples from nature, history, and other cultures that show the reality that multiple gender expression is perfectly natural and has always existed. The information is also linked to popular children’s media such as books and movies that can start the conversation with children. For more resources visit our website: www.reflectionpress.com/genderguide

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  • Much of the information presented in this slide show is also in the Gender Now Coloring Book and the Gender Now Activity Book: School Edition published by Reflection Press. The goal of the slide show is to provide examples from nature, history, and other cultures that show the reality that multiple gender expression is perfectly natural and has always existed. The information is also linked to popular children’s media such as books and movies that can start the conversation with children. For more resources visit our website: www.reflectionpress.com/genderguide
  • A small sampling of the diversity of gender expression in the natural world. Much of the information about the natural world can be found in these wonderful books especially Evolution’s Rainbow by Joan Roughgarden
  • BULLFROG (Kermit/the princess and the frog) there are two different kinds of boy bull frogs. Which means they have 3 genders.
  • SPOTTED RED HYENA- (Lion king) the boys and the girls look and act so much alike, it can be difficult to tell them apart, even if you look closely.
  • HAWAIIAN GECKO- ( go to sleep gecko-balinese folk tale) these geckos are all girls. There are no boys. More all girl species live in the south pacific, French Polynesia and the marianas islands near new guinea.
  • BEAR- (brother bear, goldilocks, jungle book) many grizzly, black, brown and polar bears have bodies that are both boy and girl at the same time. Native American have many old stories about bears who are “male mothers.”
  • CLOWN FISH- (finding nemo) the girl clown fish body is larger than the boy body. And if the girl goes away and leaves the boy clown fish with the little fishes, he changes his body into a girl clown fish.
  • DEER- (open season, bambi) the girl white tailed deer has a boy looking body. These deer have 5 different bodies. Black tailed, red tailed, swamp, sika and roe deer, moose and elk all have more than just boy and girl bodies.
  • KANGAROO- (Winnie the pooh) many red and gray kangaroos, euros, tammar wallabies and quokkas have bodies that are both boy and girl at the same time. That way joey can ride in the mama or papa’s pouch.
  • SPARROW- (everywhere!) these birds have two types of boys and two types of girls.
  • GARTER SNAKE- (out in nature closer than you think!) some boy garter snakes can make the same perfume as the girl snakes and act the same too.
  • BIG HORN SHEEP- (shaun the sheep, babe the pig) some of the boy big horn sheep while looking like the other boy sheep will act much more like the girls. There are some thoughts that this promotes friendship.
  • BUTTERFLY- (velmagratch and the very cool butterfly/book-comes well reviewed, sounds relevant) this amazing butterfly was found in china with one boy wing and one girl wing!
  • DOLPHIN- (daisy the different dolphin, Dolphin Tale) some of these dolphins have bodies that are both boy and girl. This is also true of bowhead whales and fin whales in the deep, deep sea.
  • HUMMINGBIRD- (flit in pocahontes/garden) in Portuguese hummingbirds are called beijaflo, which means to “kiss flowers.” These beautiful birds also have masculine females and feminine males.
  • BAT- (stellaluna/book) bats create long lasting families where everyone takes care of each other. They do not have boy/girl ways to act. Their main concern is with everyone being strong.
  • SPIDER MONKEY- (go, diego, go—rescues spider monkeys,jumanji) it is difficult to tell which ones are girls in these monkeys as well as bush babies, wooly monkeys and muriqui because their bodies look so much like boy bodies.
  • SEA HORSE- (mr. seahorse by ericcarle, little mermaid has a sea horse character) boy sea horses have a pouch where the girl sea horse places the fertilized sea horse eggs. This allows the boy to be pregnant and care for the growing babies.
  • SNAIL- (garden, are you a snail? Book) all snails are both boy and girl at the same time.
  • BELUGA WHALE- (baby beluga) some beluga whales have bodies that are both boy and girl at the same time.
  • On nearly every continent, and for all of recorded history, thriving cultures have recognized, revered, and integrated more than two genders. Terms such as transgender and gay are strictly new constructs that assume three things: that there are only two sexes (male/female), as many as two sexualities (gay/straight), and only two genders (man/woman).Yet hundreds of distinct societies around the globe have their own long-established traditions for third, fourth, fifth, or more genders. Fred Martinez, for example, was not a boy who wanted to be a girl, but both a boy and a girl — an identity his Navajo culture recognized and revered as nádleehí. Most Western societies have no direct correlation for this Native “two-spirit” tradition, nor for the many other communities without strict either/or conceptions of sex, sexuality, and gender. Worldwide, the sheer variety of gender expression is almost limitless.Much of this information can be found online particularly on Wikipedia.
  • WE WHA-NATIVE AMERICAN-(1849–1896) was a ZuniNative American from New Mexico. She was the most famous lhamana, a traditional Zuni gender role, now described as mixed-gender or Two-Spirit. Ihamana were men who lived in part as women, wearing a mixture of women&apos;s and men&apos;s clothing and doing a great deal of women&apos;s work as well as serving as mediators.The anthropologist Matilda Coxe Stevenson wrote a great deal about We&apos;wha, and even hosted her on her visit to Washington D.C. in 1886. During that visit, she met President Grover Cleveland and was generally mistaken for a biological woman. One of the anthropologists close to her described her as “…the strongest character and the most intelligent of the Zuni tribe.”She was a cultural ambassador for her people, and performed the role of Kolhamana, the lhamanakachina of the Zuni. 150 different Native American tribes acknowledge and honor more than two genders.
  • HIJRA-INDIA/PAKISTAN-In the culture of South Asia, hijras are physiological males who have feminine gender identity, women&apos;s clothing and other feminine gender roles. Hijras have a long recorded history in the Indian subcontinent, from the Mughal Empire period onwards. This history features a number of well-known roles within subcontinentalcultures, part gender-liminal, part spiritual and part survival.These identities have no exact match in the modern Western taxonomy of gender and sexual orientation,[12] and challenge Western ideas of sex and gender.[4] Most are born apparently male, but some may be intersex (with ambiguous genitalia). They are often perceived as a third sex, and most see themselves as neither men nor women. Unlike some Western transsexual women, hijras generally do not attempt to pass as women.
  • FA’AFAFINE/SAMOAN CULTURE-Fa&apos;afafine are biological males who have a strong feminine gender orientation, which the Samoan parents recognize quite early in childhood, and then raise them as female children or rather &apos;third gender&apos; children. They grow up as Fa&apos;afafines, who are a gender category/identity altogether different from men and women, and so they have their distinct gender roles specific to them, different from both men and women. It is something which is not discouraged in the traditional fa&apos;asamoa (Samoan society).Fa&apos;afafine are known for their hard work and dedication to the family, in the Samoan tradition of tautua. Ideas of the family in Samoa and Polynesia are markedly different from Western constructions of family, and include all the members of a sa, or a communal family within the fa&apos;amatai family systems.[2]The top left and bottom right images are by the internationally recognized artist, Shigeyuki Kihara. She explores her identity as a Fa’afafine through her work.
  • MUXES/ZAPOTEC-OAXACA, MX-In Zapotec cultures of Oaxaca in southern Mexico, a muxe is a physically male individual who dresses and behaves in a feminine manner; they may be seen as a third gender.[1] Some marry women and have children while others choose men as sexual or romantic partners.[2] According to anthropologist Lynn Stephen, muxe &quot;may do certain kinds of women’s work such as embroidery or decorating home altars, but others do the male work of making jewelry. Many now have white-collar jobs and are involved in politics.&quot;In contrast to Mexico&apos;s majority mestizo culture (where machismo prevails), the isthmus of Oaxaca has a predominantly Zapotec population, and it is widely reported that there is less hostility toward muxe in the region than homosexual, effeminate males and trans women face elsewhere in the strongly Catholic country. One study estimates that 6 percent of males in an Isthmus Zapotec community in the early 1970s were muxe.[5] Other Zapotec communities have similar &quot;third gender&quot; roles, such as the biza’ah of Teotitlán del Valle.
  • BISSU/SOUTH SULAWESI-INDONESIA-Bissu is one of the five genders of the Bugis, an ethnic group of South Sulawesi in Indonesia. The Bissu are commonly termed &quot;gender transcendent&quot; or as &quot;having a ritual role&quot; in the Bugis culture.Calabai is one of the five genders of the Bugis. According to their gender system, a calabai is a &apos;false woman&apos;. So, to be a calabai, the person would be outwardly a man, but, in every other aspect, a woman. However, not being a woman, they do not consider themselves so, and neither do others. Nor do they want to become women. But they are not men either, and have created a special place for themselves within Bugis society.Calalai (masculine female) is a term in the gender system of the Bugis. It denotes a &quot;false man&quot;: a person with the anatomy of a woman, but with the sexuality, roles, occupations, and habits of a male. As they do not want to be an actual male, and are not considered to be a male by themselves or others, they have been given a separate designation.A spiritual leader of the Bissu said “all 5 genders must coexist for there to be universal harmony. If one of the genders is separated then the world will become unbalanced.”
  • A small sampling of the diversity of gender expression throughout history. A wonderful book that contains a lot of this information is Transgender Warriors by Leslie Feinberg.
  • ALBERT CASHIER-ireland/united states-an irish born soldier in the union army during the American civil war. The novel for middle school readers, my last skirt, by Lynda durrant, is based on his life. there have been plans to resore the house that cashier lived in for forty years.
  • JOAN OF ARC-france-visionary, soldier and patron saint of france. She was a peasant girl who led the French army when she was 17 years old. She insisted that she wear men’s clothing to do the work she was called to do. It was, in fact, for this that she was ultimately burned at the stake.
  • DR. ALAN HART-united states-physician, radiologist, tuberculosis researcher, write and novelist. He pioneered the use of x-ray photography in tuberculosis detection, and help implement TB screening programs that saved thousands of lives.
  • BIG MAMA THORTON-united states-rhythm and blues singer, songwriter and musician. First to record elvis’ huge hit “hound dog” and wrote and recorded Janis joplin’s hit “ball and chain.” In 1984 she was inducted into the blues foundation hall of fame for her musical contribution. Although coaxed into dresses during her early career, she later became known for wearing men’s suits and a straw cowboy hat.
  • BILLIE TIPTON-united states- jazz musician and bandleader who lived as a man for nearly 50 years.
  • CHARLEY PARKHURST-united states-Americanstagecoach driver and early California settler. Born female, Parkhurst lived as a man for most of his life and may have been the first biological female to vote in California. The children’s book, Rough Tough Charley is about him.
  • Find more resources on our website www.reflectionpress.com/genderguide and more about the coloring books at www.reflectionpress.com/gendernow
  • It's Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible

    1. 1. “all 5 genders must coexist for there to be universal harmony. If one of the genders is separated then the world will become unbalanced”<br />~ spiritual leader of the Bissu<br />It’s perfectly natural<br />Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />Maya Christina Gonzalez<br />Artist, Author, Educator<br />cofounder of Reflection Press<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />“a people should not long for their own image”<br />
    2. 2. Gender in Nature<br />A note about language:<br /><ul><li>Language has limitations.
    3. 3. Most of the modern concepts around gender were not developed until the second half of the century so many terms do not translate through history, to other cultures, or to nature.
    4. 4. For the purposes of this presentation I will use the term transgender
    5. 5. Transgender is “an umbrella term…uniting all those whose gender identity does not easily mesh with their gender assigned at birth”</li></ul>A small sample of the diversity of gender expression in the natural world<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    6. 6. Gender in Nature<br />Bullfrog<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    7. 7. Gender in Nature<br />Red spotted hyena<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    8. 8. Gender in Nature<br />Hawaiian gecko<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    9. 9. Gender in Nature<br />Bear<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    10. 10. Gender in Nature<br />Clownfish<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    11. 11. Gender in Nature<br />Deer<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    12. 12. Gender in Nature<br />Red Kangaroo<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    13. 13. Gender in Nature<br />White-throated sparrow<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    14. 14. Gender in Nature<br />Garter Snake<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    15. 15. Gender in Nature<br />Big Horn Sheep<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    16. 16. Gender in Nature<br />Butterfly<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    17. 17. Gender in Nature<br />Striped Dolphin<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    18. 18. Gender in Nature<br />Hummingbird<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    19. 19. Gender in Nature<br />Bat<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    20. 20. Gender in Nature<br />Spider Monkey<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    21. 21. Gender in Nature<br />Sea Horse<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    22. 22. Gender in Nature<br />Snail<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    23. 23. Gender in Nature<br />Beluga Whale<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    24. 24. Gender Across Cultures<br />On nearly every continent, and for all of recorded history, thriving cultures have recognized, revered, and integrated more than two genders. <br />A Map of Gender-Diverse Cultures<br />http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/two-spirits/map.html<br />A small sample of the diversity of gender expression across cultures<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    25. 25. Gender Across Cultures<br />Lhamana/Two-spirit<br />Native American<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    26. 26. Gender Across Cultures<br />Hijra<br />India/Pakistan<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    27. 27. Gender Across Cultures<br />Fa’afafine<br />Samoa<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    28. 28. Gender Across Cultures<br />Muxe<br />Zapotec-Oaxaca,MX<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    29. 29. Gender Across Cultures<br />Bissu<br />South Sulawesi-Indonesia<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    30. 30. Gender in History<br />Whether visible or not there have always been transgender people<br />in every color of the human rainbow, <br />in every time in history, <br />in every country of the world, <br />in every class of work.<br />Transgender people are <br />kings and queens, <br />soldiers and artists, <br />ambassadors and doctors…<br />A small sample of the diversity of gender expression throughout history<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    31. 31. Gender in History<br />Albert Cashier<br />Ireland/United States<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    32. 32. Gender in History<br />Joan of Arc<br />France<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    33. 33. Gender in History<br />Dr. Alan Hart<br />United States<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    34. 34. Gender in History<br />Big Mama Thorton<br />United States<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    35. 35. Gender in History<br />Billie Tipton<br />United States<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    36. 36. Gender in History<br />Charley Parkhurst<br />United States<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />It’s Perfectly Natural: Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />
    37. 37. It’s Perfectly Natural!<br />Additional Resources<br /><ul><li>Gender Now Coloring Bookwritten and illustrated by Maya Gonzalez
    38. 38. Incorporates a lot of the information in this presentation into a fun coloring book for kids of all ages. Also available through Reflection Press: School Version Activity Book suited for the classroom and Animal Poster that incorporates all of the animals with kid-friendly terms. www.reflectionpress.com/gendernow
    39. 39. Evolution’s Rainbowby Joan Roughgarden
    40. 40. Transgender Warriors by Leslie Feinberg
    41. 41. Children’s Books from slideshow:
    42. 42. Go to Sleep Gecko – Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What do you hear? – Polar Bear, Polar Bear, What do you hear? – Shaun the Sheep – Velma Gratch and the Way Cool Butterfly – Stellaluna – Daisy the Different Dolphin – Mister Seahorse – Are you a Snail? - Baby Beluga – My Last Skirt – Joan of Arc – Rough, Tough Charley – Charley’s Choice – Riding Freedom
    43. 43. Children’s Movies from slideshow:
    44. 44. The Princess and the Frog – The Lion King – Brother Bear – Finding Nemo – Jungle Book – Open Season – Bambi – Winnie the Pooh – Babe – Dolphin Tale – Jumanji – The Little Mermaid Go Diego Go – Joan of Arc – The Messenger - Pocahontus</li></ul>Multiple Gender Expression in Nature, Cultures, and History Made Visible<br />Maya Christina Gonzalez<br />Artist, Author, Educator<br />cofounder of Reflection Press<br />www.reflectionpress.com<br />“a people should not long for their own image”<br />

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