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chen2.pptx

  1. — Don Norman “ The best kind of design is not necessarily an object, a space or a structure: it is a process – dynamic and adaptable.”
  2. MIXED METHOD
  3. INTRODUCTION TO MIXED METHOD WHAT IS MIXED METHODOLOGY? EXAMPLES OF MIXED METHOD WHAT ARE THE EXAMPLES? HOW IMPORTANT IS IT? 1 3 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS SIGNIFICANCE OF MIXED METHOD ADVANGES AND DISADVANTAGES WHAT ARE THE CONS AND PROS? 4
  4. INTRODUCTI ON TO MIXED METHOD 1 WHAT IS IT?
  5. According to the National Institutes of Health, mixed methods strategically integrates or combines rigorous quantitative and qualitative research methods to draw on the strengths of each. MIXED METHOD
  6. NOUN AS A TECHNIQUE ABOUT MIXED METHOD II This refers to the ways in which qualitative and quantitative research activities are brought together to achieve greater insight. Integration The act of bringing together smaller components or information stored in different subsystems into a single functioning unit.
  7. EXAMPLES OF MIXED METHOD 2 What are the identified techniques?
  8. Explanatory sequential  You first collect and analyze quantitative data.  This is followed by gathering and analyzing qualitative data.
  9. Example : You can estimate the average number of accidents and determine which areas are classified as high risk. From these conclusions, you can interview drivers in these areas and analyze their responses in a qualitative framework. Based on your qualitative data, you can give possible explanations for why accidents happen in some sections and investigate specific causes.
  10. Exploratory sequential In this inverseapproach, researchers examine qualitative data points and then collect and analyze quantitative data sets.
  11. Example : You can begin by talking to drivers or handing out questionnaires to discover hazardous road sections. This is followed by looking at the number of accidents in these sections to compare the statistics with the general drivers’ sentiments.
  12. Parallel In a parallel approach, researchers collect both quantitativeand qualitativedata simultaneously. The findings are analyzed separately, then their respective conclusions are compared to give a general conclusion.
  13. Example: In the analysis of road safety, you can carry out both quantitative and qualitative research as follows: Qualitative research – You can look at the driver’s comments and issues raised on online platforms such as Twitter. Quantitative research – You can analyze traffic police reports on the frequency of accidents in various road sections.
  14. Nested The nested approach is also known as the embedded method. In this design, both qualitativeand quantitativedata are collected concurrently. However, one type of data takes precedence over the other.
  15. Example : In the quantitative test, you can investigate if the frequency of the drivers’ concerns about a particular road section corresponds with the frequency of accidents in that section. You can include some qualitative questionnaires to support your quantitative findings.
  16. THE SIGNIFICANCE 3 Is it worth it?
  17. • It is useful in understandingtheinformationsystems world which is both social and natural in nature to present a full picture of the phenomenon.  Expandsandstrengthensa study'sconclusionsand, therefore, contribute to the published literature.
  18. • Providesa better and deeper understanding,by providing a fuller picturethat can enhance description and understandingof the phenomena.  Allows a more holisticview in studying information systems.
  19. THE PROS AND CONS 4 WHAT ARE THE RESUTS ?
  20. THE ADVANTAGES
  21. THE BEST OF TWO WORLDS VERSATILITY offerS A more flexibility when formulating research problems EXPANDING 1ST 3RD THE POSITIVES! ensures in-depth and generalizable findings. 2ND leads to more discoveries beyond the initial research problem.
  22. THE DISADVANTAGES
  23. A shortage of skilled personnel due to the complex nature of the quantitative methods available. THE CONS! MISMATCH OF CONCLUSIO NS LACK OF RESOURCE S Collecting and analyzing data may consume a lot of time and resources. SKILL GAPS COMPLEXI TY It can be difficult to plan and apply one method using the results of another. 01 02 03 04 Some research designs, such as the parallel design, may yield contrasting results.
  24. CREDITS: This presentation template was created by Slidesgo, including icons by Flaticon, infographics & images by Freepik THANKS !
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