Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Fashionably Practical: Fusing Fashion & Technology

1,449 views

Published on

Part of the Summer Series, Design of Wearables.

Published in: Design

Fashionably Practical: Fusing Fashion & Technology

  1. 1. Fashionably Practical: Fusing Fashion + Technology Kyle Chan, CCA and Jen Costillo, Rebelbot
  2. 2. Aesthetic Futures “Technology and fashion are a perfect match. The fast-paced progress of technology complements fashion’s ever evolving aesthetic.” – Bradley Quinn, (2012) Fashion Futures, London, Merrel
  3. 3. Agenda • Different Worlds • Case Studies • Design Process
  4. 4. Worlds Collide
  5. 5. Different Worlds SW/UX HWRF Mech/ID CLR/M AT PROD/ FIN PROTO Con/D ev TECH FASHION
  6. 6. Evolution
  7. 7. SW/UX HWRF Mech/ID Technology’s View
  8. 8. SW/UX HWRF Mech/ID • Fit – Biomechanical – Sizing • Form – Profile/Sleekness – Placement • Function – Environment – UI/UX – Displays Mechanical Challenges
  9. 9. SW/UX HWRF Mech/ID • Antenna – placement – Pattern • Power • Persistent connection • Protocol • Certifications – SAR – FCC – PTCRB – FDA RF Challenges
  10. 10. SW/UX HWRF Mech/ID • Volume of hardware • Power – Battery – Charging • Computing – Memory – speed Hardware Challenges
  11. 11. SW/UX HWRF Mech/ID • Algorithms • User Experience and Interface • Data Collection Software Challenges
  12. 12. Development Process Waterfall Method
  13. 13. • Aesthetics • Glamour • Craft • Seasonal • Experienced SEASON TARGET CUSTOMER MARKET Fashion’s View CLR/M AT PROD/ FIN PROTO Con/D ev
  14. 14. • Markets • Brands • Market categories • Price points • Seasons • Fashion Collection CONCEPT TO PROD. Market and Seasons
  15. 15. The Human Experience
  16. 16. • Long development time • Availability of materials • Managing many products • Production • Desirability COLOR/ MATERIAL ASSEMBLY FINISHING PATTERN PROTO- TYPE CONCEPT DESIGN Fashion’s Concerns
  17. 17. CONCEPT • Target market • Context/environment • Purpose/specific usage • Form vs function vs fit balance REALITY • Target market ≠ market segment • Price point • COGS • Fashion cycle • Production and distribution • Fabric and technology Product Concept and Realities
  18. 18. Model for Development for Wearables Gilsoo Cho, (2010) Smart Clothing: Technology and Applications Boca Raton, CRC Press
  19. 19. Model for a Successful Wearable © 2014 Kyle Chan and Jen Costillo
  20. 20. Proposed Model: Smart Clothing © 2014 Kyle Chan and Jen Costillo
  21. 21. CASE STUDIESApple “Smart Garment” patent related to Nike + iPod, 2012
  22. 22. WEARABLES ECOSYSTEM
  23. 23. WEARABLE CATEGORIES • Body signal and environment monitoring • Entertainment and/or social media • Photonic • Extra Functional • Artistic Smart Clothing Categories:
  24. 24. Social Emoting Wearable NECOMIMI • Brainwave sensors show your emotions • Awkward • Obvious in any setting
  25. 25. Geometry Darling Bag • High-end accessory • Flexible fashion statement • Understandable form • Photonic with extra functions SWITCH EMBASSY
  26. 26. The Core • Sensors: Smart Activewear ATHOS CLOTHING - Embedded in fabric - Muscles exerting force or stretching0- EMG - Heart rate - Breathing rate.
  27. 27. Haute Couture/ RTW CUTE CIRCUIT • iMini Skirt • £ 3,750.00
  28. 28. • Materialize 3D printed • Blending Social behavior and conceptual fashion Cutting Edge ANOUK WHIPPRECHT
  29. 29. BREAK
  30. 30. Starting Out Going from nudity to a product • What is your concept? WORKSHOP
  31. 31. 2/20/2014 32Costillo Exercise 1 • Who is your target market? DEFINE
  32. 32. Exercise 2: What do they need? DEFINE
  33. 33. ASSESS Fashion Strategy • Garment styling • Biomechanics • Textiles & Trimmings • Sizing & Fit • Device(s) placement
  34. 34. Exercise 3: make a mock up REFINE
  35. 35. Exercise 4: Antenna location? Where is there not RF in the way 36RF • Using the paper model, where could the antenna be located • Where to add the antenna without impacting mechanical or manufacturing design
  36. 36. Exercise 5: Power Strategy • Using the target market, what does their user story look like? • What would charger look like? • How long between charges? 2/20/2014 Costillo 37 What is acceptable to the consumer? 12 hours 1 day /constant use
  37. 37. Exercise 6: What Data Do You Share?
  38. 38. Making it last TESTING FASHION: • Durability and Sustainability • Fabric choices and care • Re-use
  39. 39. Waterproofing 2/20/2014 Costillo 40TESTING
  40. 40. Sweat Proofing • Choose Materials Carefully • Corrosion • Color-fastness • ISO formulations – ISO 105 – ISO 3160 – ISO 1164 • Homebrew • Lots of field testing 2/20/2014 Costillo 41TESTING
  41. 41. 2/20/2014 Costillo 42 Environment Proofing TESTING • Salt Water • Arid climate • Sun exposure • The Environmental Oven is your friend
  42. 42. TESTING Exercise 7: What are your big testing challenges or unknowns? • Name two ways around it. • Other Issues?
  43. 43. FUTURE of WEARABLES • Conductive fibers, dyes and textiles. • Print-as-needed components/items • Environmentally sensitive Dyes • Photo-reactive coatings • Seamless mechanics • Licensing
  44. 44. • Prototyping – Lilypad – Flora – Metawear (requires enclosure) • Sensors – Invensense – Nuerosky Resources
  45. 45. THANK YOU • Jen Costillo Jen@rebelbot.com • Kyle Chan kchan2@cca.edu

×