Designing an Event Email Marketing Strategy December 16, 2009 Rebecca Nevin – Interaction Designer, Blackbaud Internet Sol...
<ul><li>Email Overview </li></ul><ul><li>Anatomy of an Effective Email </li></ul><ul><li>Event Email Strategy </li></ul>Ag...
Overview <ul><ul><li>Email is a promotion catalyzes for peer-to-peer fundraising success </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Email ...
Participants are Becoming Multi-channel Fundraisers
Average Gift Expectations
Connection Between Social Media & Email
Participants find social networking tools from emails
Anatomy of an effective email message
“ From” Address Lines <ul><li>The &quot;From&quot; line should reflect an identifiable organizational figure </li></ul><ul...
Subject Line <ul><li>The Top 10 List </li></ul><ul><ul><li>One of the most consistently successful approaches (and it almo...
Subject Line: Descriptive and Inviting (Honest) <ul><li>Keep subject lines clear and simple – NOT promotional </li></ul><u...
<ul><li>Content - Think About the Audience </li></ul><ul><li>Use dynamic content </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The more specific t...
<ul><li>Content </li></ul><ul><li>Use stories to engage readers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Share stories and encourage particip...
<ul><li>Compelling Call to Action </li></ul><ul><li>The call-to-action should compel readers to do something </li></ul><ul...
<ul><li>Compelling Call to Action </li></ul><ul><li>Give participants a “To Do List” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Update their pi...
Best Practices for Email Design <ul><li>Design for the preview pane of email applications </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Only the t...
Design for Mobile Devices <ul><li>Increasingly, participants will be reading email via Blackberry or iPhone </li></ul><ul>...
<ul><li>Email Editing Do’s and Don’ts </li></ul><ul><li>Never copy and paste text or images directly from Microsoft Word o...
More Email Editing Do’s and Don’ts <ul><li>Always resize and compress images before inserting into your message </li></ul>...
More Email Editing Do’s and Don’ts <ul><li>Be careful when selecting text to edit/replace </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If you sel...
Example
Test, Track, Review and Adjust <ul><li>Always send a test email to several  email service providers (Yahoo, Gmail, Hotmail...
Event Email Strategy
Site Launch Phase <ul><li>Should happen at least 6 months before the event date. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ideally, in a 12 mo...
Acknowledgement Emails <ul><li>Take advantage of your registration and donation acknowledgements </li></ul><ul><li>Use the...
Recruitment Phase <ul><li>1 - 4 months after site launch </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If you’re on a 12 month cycle the recruitme...
Fundraising Phase <ul><li>1 month after launch – Event Week </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If you’re on a 12 month cycle the fundra...
Event Phase <ul><li>Event Week </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Email as often as needed </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Content should focus ...
Stewardship & Planning Phase <ul><li>Event Week – Site launch </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If you don’t launch your site until 6 ...
Questions?  Answers? [email_address] @tweetrebecca www.netwitsthinktank.com
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Net Wits Web Seminar Fundraising Event Email

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Know-How on Designing an Event Email Marketing Strategy
Join us as we talk about maximizing the impact of this fundraising staple. We will cover topics including email timing, frequency, and design.

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Net Wits Web Seminar Fundraising Event Email

  1. 1. Designing an Event Email Marketing Strategy December 16, 2009 Rebecca Nevin – Interaction Designer, Blackbaud Internet Solutions Read our blog: www.netwitsthinktank.com
  2. 2. <ul><li>Email Overview </li></ul><ul><li>Anatomy of an Effective Email </li></ul><ul><li>Event Email Strategy </li></ul>Agenda
  3. 3. Overview <ul><ul><li>Email is a promotion catalyzes for peer-to-peer fundraising success </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Email is a training tool you can use to coach your event participants </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Email is a way to stay in touch year round with your event donors & participants so their affinity for your organization stays strong and they continue to support your organization year after year </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Participants are Becoming Multi-channel Fundraisers
  5. 5. Average Gift Expectations
  6. 6. Connection Between Social Media & Email
  7. 7. Participants find social networking tools from emails
  8. 8. Anatomy of an effective email message
  9. 9. “ From” Address Lines <ul><li>The &quot;From&quot; line should reflect an identifiable organizational figure </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t use a random name that people are not familiar with. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t assume everyone knows your Executive Director’s name. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Play it safe and use the organization’s name. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Avoid numbers or symbols in the “From” line — they may trigger spam filters </li></ul><ul><li>Use consistent “From” name and “Reply-To” addresses to build your sender reputation </li></ul>If readers don’t recognize you, they are likely to flag your message as spam
  10. 10. Subject Line <ul><li>The Top 10 List </li></ul><ul><ul><li>One of the most consistently successful approaches (and it almost always gets opened). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Readers are curious and know they won’t have to sift through paragraphs of copy. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Top 10 Reasons </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Top Five Priorities </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Top Four Concerns </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>The Research Subject Line </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Feature a compelling statistic in the subject line and make it relevant to the reader. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A research headline is less promotional, promises valuable information, and enhances your credibility as a knowledge resource. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Example: “56% of Those Living in Poverty are Women. Help Them Beat the Odds” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>The Quiz </li></ul><ul><ul><li>One of the fastest and easiest ways to engage your audience. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Include one intriguing question in the subject line, followed by the answer in the body of the email. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Example “1 in how many men will get prostate cancer?” </li></ul></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Subject Line: Descriptive and Inviting (Honest) <ul><li>Keep subject lines clear and simple – NOT promotional </li></ul><ul><li>Limit subject lines to 50-60 characters maximum (Mobile devices only display the first 15-25 characters) </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid using $, ! or ALL CAPS in the subject – could trigger spam filters </li></ul><ul><li>Look inside your own junk mail folder – and don’t do what they do </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>Content - Think About the Audience </li></ul><ul><li>Use dynamic content </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The more specific the message the greater the impact </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide content that is appropriate for the participant type you are speaking to </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>For donors show them how their donation makes a direct impact, get them to engage outside the event, sign up for newsletters. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Target different content to company leaders, team leaders, individuals, and families </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Go beyond and segment your list to target content event more specifically (Custom fields, age, sex, etc) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It helps reduce unsubscribes </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. <ul><li>Content </li></ul><ul><li>Use stories to engage readers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Share stories and encourage participants to share stories to engage readers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use statistics, testimonials, case studies, and expert opinions to support a point </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Demonstrate a clear purpose and a clear call to action </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Each email should have one main point, with a clear call to action </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Give readers a compelling reason to act now </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Content should be related to the Event Fundraising phases you are in </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure you promote your event’s social media </li></ul>
  14. 14. <ul><li>Compelling Call to Action </li></ul><ul><li>The call-to-action should compel readers to do something </li></ul><ul><li>Give participants a sense of excitement and urgency </li></ul><ul><li>Use specific action-oriented language </li></ul><ul><li>User verbs to keep it active – write sparingly and make those few words count </li></ul><ul><li>Instead of “You should sign up soon” try “Sign up by Friday and get a free armband” </li></ul>
  15. 15. <ul><li>Compelling Call to Action </li></ul><ul><li>Give participants a “To Do List” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Update their picture and story </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Create YouTube video </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Email </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Facebook </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tweet </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Offline </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Have weekly/monthly contest or raffles </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Give away gift cards </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sponsor a YouTube video contest </li></ul></ul>
  16. 16. Best Practices for Email Design <ul><li>Design for the preview pane of email applications </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Only the top 2-4 inches (or 500-600 pixels) of your email will be viewable in the preview pane </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Recipients will rarely open an email to view your full message (so you must respect the preview) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>One giant image is not good idea </li></ul><ul><ul><li>It may look pretty, but if the image is blocked by the browser, you no longer have a message </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Never put important information (or the call to action) in an image </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Again, if the image is blocked, the message will be lost </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If you are going to do this, always recap the information within the email text </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Avoid large blocks of text — use headlines for increased “scannability” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Try to limit total length to around 300 words </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Amount of content “allowed” depends on your audience and past relationship </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Remind recipients to add organization to their address book/safe sender list </li></ul><ul><li>Test HTML email in multiple email clients before sending </li></ul>
  17. 17. Design for Mobile Devices <ul><li>Increasingly, participants will be reading email via Blackberry or iPhone </li></ul><ul><li>Design emails for mobile reading </li></ul><ul><li>Mobile readers are more likely to scan, not read </li></ul><ul><li>Include compelling call to action in your subject line </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid “top heavy” images in the design </li></ul><ul><li>Use “ALT” tags on images </li></ul><ul><li>Test messages on handheld devices </li></ul>
  18. 18. <ul><li>Email Editing Do’s and Don’ts </li></ul><ul><li>Never copy and paste text or images directly from Microsoft Word or another word processing program </li></ul><ul><li>Use the “Paste from word” icon in the HTML editor, “Clean” the code before pasting, or try pasting into Notepad and then copy/paste into the email </li></ul><ul><li>Pasting directly from Word tends to transfer some of the underling code which will distort your message </li></ul>
  19. 19. More Email Editing Do’s and Don’ts <ul><li>Always resize and compress images before inserting into your message </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sphere allows you to easily insert images into messages but it isn’t a robust image editing tool </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It’s best to use a 3 rd party graphic software to prepare the image before uploading </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Always include important content within body content – not just in images </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Many email services block images by default and your reader may not decide to display the images </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To ensure your most important message are viewable include them in the first part of the message (top of content) </li></ul></ul>
  20. 20. More Email Editing Do’s and Don’ts <ul><li>Be careful when selecting text to edit/replace </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If you select more than jus the text you are trying to edit (like a blank space) you may inadvertently delete the underlying code and distort the formatting </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Use only Web-safe fonts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The most common are Arial, Verdana, Georgia, and Times New Roman </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If they aren’t web safe they may not work in some email service providers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If you have a font that’s not web safe and you must use it, it is safest to use it as an image. </li></ul></ul>
  21. 21. Example
  22. 22. Test, Track, Review and Adjust <ul><li>Always send a test email to several email service providers (Yahoo, Gmail, Hotmail, Outlook) </li></ul><ul><li>Review the Spam report Sphere sends and make adjustments </li></ul>
  23. 23. Event Email Strategy
  24. 24. Site Launch Phase <ul><li>Should happen at least 6 months before the event date. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ideally, in a 12 month cycle the next year’s site would launch 1-2 months after the previous year’s event </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1 email on launch day and consider another 2 weeks later (only for those who still have not registered </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Make sure you remind returning participants to use the same username and password they used the previous year </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Will allow then to review reports of their donor history </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduces duplicates and keeps your date more accurate </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Focus on recruiting your past Team Leaders and Company Leaders </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Once you get your leaders they can do the recruiting work for you </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Make sure you have opt-in options on your Registration and Donation forms </li></ul>
  25. 25. Acknowledgement Emails <ul><li>Take advantage of your registration and donation acknowledgements </li></ul><ul><li>Use the advanced confirmation option and create an email using all the best practices discussed in this presentation </li></ul>
  26. 26. Recruitment Phase <ul><li>1 - 4 months after site launch </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If you’re on a 12 month cycle the recruitment phase can be longer ! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1 email every 2-3 weeks (per audience type) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Turn top fundraising individual into Team Leaders </li></ul><ul><li>Continue focusing on recruiting your past Team Leaders and Company Leaders – aim for 80% or more retention </li></ul><ul><li>Content should focus on helping team leaders recruit team members </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide recruiting email templates </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Encourage leaders to create personal emails and give them tips on how to create an effective email. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Give recruitment incentives for motivation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Show how recruitment pays off for team fundraising success </li></ul></ul>
  27. 27. Fundraising Phase <ul><li>1 month after launch – Event Week </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If you’re on a 12 month cycle the fundraising phase can be longer! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1 email every 2-3 weeks (per audience type) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Content should focus on helping team leaders support their teams and participants to raise money </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide training on how to personalize the fundraising page/use tools </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tips how to use social networking to raise more money </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide fundraising email templates </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Encourage participants to create personal emails and give them tips on how to create an effective email. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Give fundraising incentives for motivation, weekly raffles, YouTube video creation contest, etc </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Give participants specific facts they can use to show the value of a donation to their potential donors </li></ul></ul>
  28. 28. Event Phase <ul><li>Event Week </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Email as often as needed </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Content should focus on last minute fundraising and event logistics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>No better time for the “Compelling Call to Action” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide tips for last minute fundraising </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Remind participants that it’s okay to send a second email to their friends and family who haven’t yet donated </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Give participants information on event details, parking, how to turn in offline money </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Encourage participants to send Tweets, or Facebook updates and images during the event (don’t forget the hash tags) </li></ul></ul>
  29. 29. Stewardship & Planning Phase <ul><li>Event Week – Site launch </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If you don’t launch your site until 6 months before the event this could be your longest phase ! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1 email every 3-4 weeks (per audience type) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Reach out to donors </li></ul><ul><li>Content should focus event success, wrap up, impact and building long term loyalty </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Keep the fundraising going for at least 1 more month </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Remind your participants to thank their donors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Publically praise high achievers, inspiring stories, and unique achievements </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide the final event stats </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Collect feedback on everything </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Plan for next year </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Get your site launched sooner </li></ul></ul>
  30. 30. Questions? Answers? [email_address] @tweetrebecca www.netwitsthinktank.com

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