Free the Children Book Study

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The Free the Children Book Study was created to give English teachers of Grades 9 and 10 a creative and practical resource to accomplish reading requirements and curriculum goals while introducing students to complex global issues.
Using student centered, critical thinking and project based learning activities, this book study helps teachers guide their students through the reading of Free the Children by Craig Kielburger. Consisting of seven detailed lessons and a final class project, this book study is arranged in a simple step-by-step manner. Each lesson is equipped with an overview of the purpose, the resources required, an estimated timeline and various assessment opportunities, providing teachers with all of the tools they need to experience success.
Using English curriculum guidelines and regulations, this study will engross students in Craig’s journey to self discovery, while educating them about culture, social justice issues, children’s rights, child labour, struggles and triumphs, childhood and more. This study will raise awareness among your students, inspiring them to become active global citizens.

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Free the Children Book Study

  1. 1. BOOK STUDY FREE THE CHILDREN BY CRAIG KIELBURGER BOOK STUDYCreated by: Rebecca McAllister, B.A, M.T, Curriculum Development Specialist 1
  2. 2. FREE THE CHILDREN BY CRAIG KIELBURGER LETTER FROM CRAIG Dear Educator, Welcome to the Free the Children Book Study! In 1995 I read the headline: “Battled child labour, boy, 12, murdered.” This article was about a boy named Iqbal Masih and learning about his story led me on a journey that changed my life forever. Free the Children chronicles the first steps in my journey for justice, from the creation of Free The Children in 1995, to an incredible journey through South Asia as a thirteen year old boy and home again. As I explored Bangladesh, Thailand, India, Nepal and Pakistan, I witnessed the realities of child labour and encountered shocking injustice. This dramatically changed my ideas about the world and I vowed to take this knowledge home with me and tell the stories of the children I had met to all who would listen. As co-founder of Free The Children and Me to We, an innovative social enterprise which provides people with better choices for a better world, including socially conscious books, clothes, accessories and more, I am excited to present you with this comprehensive book study to help you bring complex global issues such as child labour, into your classroom while accomplishing curriculum goals for grades 9 and 10 English classes. I am proud to be part of this effort and am deeply grateful to all the educators like you who dedicate their time and energy to fostering a generation of world-changers. Without you, a better world would not be possible. Be The Change, Craig Kielburger Co-Founder Free The Children and Me to We2
  3. 3. BOOK STUDYCONTENTSBOOK STUDY RATIONALE 4PROLOGUE 6LESSONS Lesson 1: Preface, Prologue, Chapter 1: Thornhill, Chapter 2: Toronto 10 Lesson 2: Chapter 3: Dhaka, Chapter 4: Back to Dhaka, Chapter 5: Bangkok 14 Lesson 3: Chapter 6: Calcutta, Chapter 7: Kathmandu, Chapter 8: Varanasi, Chapter 9: Delhi 18 Lesson 4: Chapter 10: Karachi and Islamabad, Chapter 11: Lahore 22 Lesson 5: Chapter 12: Madras, Chapter 13: Sivakasi, Chapter 14: Cochin and Bombay 26 Lesson 6: Chapter 15: Thornhill and Bombay, Chapter 16: What is Childhood? 30 Lesson 7: Student-led Conference 32BLACKLINE MASTERSBlackline Master 1: Literary Devices (BLM1) 35APPENDICES Appendix A: Student Projects 36 Appendix B: Student Participation Rubric 37 Appendix C: General Rubric for Written Work 38 Appendix D: Oral Presentation Rubric 39EMPOWERING STUDENTS TO TAKE ACTION 40 3
  4. 4. FREE THE CHILDREN BY CRAIG KIELBURGER RATIONALE: The Free the Children Book Study was created to give English teachers of Grades 9 and 10 a creative and practical resource to accomplish reading requirements and curriculum goals while introducing students to complex global issues. Using student centered, critical thinking and project based learning activities, this book study helps teachers guide their students through the reading of Free the Children by Craig Kielburger. Consisting of seven detailed lessons and a final class project, this book study is arranged in a simple step-by-step manner. Each lesson is equipped with an overview of the purpose, the resources required, an estimated timeline and various assessment opportunities, providing teachers with all of the tools they need to experience success. Using English curriculum guidelines and regulations, this study will engross students in Craig’s journey to self discovery, while educating them about culture, social justice issues, children’s rights, child labour, struggles and triumphs, childhood and more. This study will raise awareness among your students, inspiring them to become active global citizens. DETAILS: Grade level: Grade 9 and 10 Course connections: Academic English Themes: child labour, childhood, hope, advocacy, humanitarianism, children’s rights, social justice, travel, independence, self discovery, goals, role models, culture, learning Estimated time: seven lessons fitting into 60-75 minute periods Resources required: Computers and internet Newspapers and magazines Class set of Free the Children Class set of travel journals World map, pins and string Chart paper, paper and writing utensils Mural paper and paint Blackline Master (BLM) Assessment Appendix A: Student Projects Appendix B: Student Participation Rubric Appendix C: General Rubric for Written Work Appendix D: Oral Presentation Rubric LEARNING GOALS: Students will: Participate in active and collaborative group work and class discussions. Communicate effectively in written and spoken language or other forms of expression. Demonstrate the ability to think critically. Develop, express and defend a position on an issue and explain how to put the ideas into action. Learn how to apply their knowledge and skills into real life scenarios. Express and organize ideas around complex global issues. Recognize themselves as citizens, communicators and members of a team. Refine their reading comprehension, oral communication and writing skills.4
  5. 5. BOOK STUDY 5
  6. 6. FREE THE CHILDREN BY CRAIG KIELBURGER PROLOGUE: PURPOSE: The purpose of this lesson is to introduce students to the contents of Free the Children prior to any reading. Students will learn about the topics of study that will be explored throughout the study. They will also be given the learning tools and strategies they are encouraged to adopt to help them achieve the learning goals of the book study. ESTIMATED TIME: 60-75 minute period RESOURCES REQUIRED: Chart paper Class set of Free the Children Class set of travel journals World map, pins and string ASSESSMENT: Appendix B: Student Participation Rubric LESSON PLAN STEP 1: TOPICS OF STUDY PURPOSE: The purpose of this step is for students to explore their prior knowledge as they learn about the main topics students will encounter throughout the book study. STEPS: 1 Explain to students that they are about to embark on an exciting book study exploring topics such as culture, social justice, charity and childhood. Through the eyes of a young Craig Kielburger, the founder of Free The Children, they will travel through South Asia on a journey for justice. 2 Throughout the upcoming study, they will explore a series of topics, including: Child labour Self-discovery Culture Travel Children’s rights South Asia Charitable organizations 3 Write these seven topics on seven pieces of chart paper and hang them around the classroom. 4 Have students walk around the room and visit each sheet, writing down what they know about each of the seven topics, along with any questions they may have. 5 When they are finished circulating, walk around the room and visit each topic. Read the comments on the sheets aloud to the students and clarify any confusion. 6 After each topic has been discussed, ask students how these topics relate to each other and ask them to predict what they will be learning about during this book study. 7 Record these theories and predictions on the board and revisit them at the conclusion of the unit of study.6
  7. 7. BOOK STUDYSTEP 2: LEARNING TOOLSPURPOSE: The purpose of this activity is to provide students with the learning tools needed throughout the book study.STEPS:1 There are a variety of elements that will remain consistent throughout this study. These elements are tools set in place to assist students with their learning.2 Identify each of the following tools: World map: o Explain to students that this map is a visual tool, allowing the class to track the countries and cities Craig has visited throughout his journey. o Hang the world map on a bulletin board in the classroom and gather pins and string. o At the beginning of each lesson ask students to identify the new cities Craig has visited in the book with a pin. When Craig moves from one place to the next, connect them with a string in chronological order. Travel journals: o Tell students that their travel journal is an independent writing project where they will record their work and track their learning during the book study. These journals will be a reflection of their own personal journey as they follow Craig through South Asia. o Distribute one journal to each student. o Ask students to write their names on their journals and decorate the covers as they please. Travel groups: o Explain to students that travel groups are 13 small collaborative groups they will be assigned to during the unit. o Each group will be paired with a geographical area that Craig visits. They will be responsible for creating a presentation on their area when it is visited in the unit. This will provide their fellow peers with more context on the places Craig visits. o Divide the students into the following groups: Group 1: Dhaka Group 2: Bangkok Group 3: Calcutta Group 4: Kathmandu Group 5: Varanasi Group 6: Delhi Group 7: Karachi Group 8: Islamabad Group 9: Lahore Group 10: Madras Group 11: Sivakasi Group 12: Cochin Group 13: Bombay o When it is their turn, groups must create a five minute presentation on their area, explaining : geographical features, cultural practice, social justice issues, type of government, urban/rural life, current state of the country and more. o Students have the freedom to structure their presentation as they wish, whether they create a PowerPoint presentation, hold a lecture or use interactive activities. o The presentation schedule is outlined throughout this unit. 7
  8. 8. FREE THE CHILDREN BY CRAIG KIELBURGER STEP 3: STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS PURPOSE: The purpose of this activity is to introduce students to reading strategies that will help them be active readers and achieve success during the book study. STEPS: 1 Explain to students that throughout this book study, they are asked to be independent learners who are active rather than passive readers. The following are three strategies they can adopt to help them with this task: Sticky notes: Encourage students to read with sticky notes in hand. As they read, ask them to use the sticky notes to mark places in the text where: o A strong emotion is evoked. o An important event occurs. o They are confused or need to ask a question. Underlining: Encourage students to read with a pen or pencil in hand. As they read ask them to underline key words, phrases or quotes that: o Are important to the message in the particular chapter. o Speak loudly to them. Connections: Connecting text to prior knowledge and personal experience can help students better comprehend and engage with passages. At the end of all assigned reading, encourage students to make the following connections with the text in their travel journal: o Text-to-self: connect with the text through their own personal experiences. o Text-to-text: connect with the text in relation to another text they have read on the same topic. o Text-to-world: connect with the text in relation to the world around them. 2 After the strategies for success have been explained ask students to discuss the benefits and purpose of each strategy. 3 Distribute a copy of Free the Children to each student in the class. 4 Explain to students that now they must begin their reading and dive into the issues as active, independent learners! TAKE HOME Reading assignment: read Preface, Prologue, Chapter 1: Thornhill and Chapter 2: Toronto. Become familiar with the learning tools and practice the strategies for success while reading.8
  9. 9. BOOK STUDY 9
  10. 10. FREE THE CHILDREN BY CRAIG KIELBURGER LESSON 1: PREFACE, PROLOGUE, CHAPTER 1: THORNHILL, CHAPTER 2: TORONTO PURPOSE: The purpose of this lesson is to review the assigned reading and allow students to become familiar with the genre, literary devices and characters in the book. ESTIMATED TIME: 60-75 minute period RESOURCES REQUIRED: Student copies of Free the Children Travel journals World map, pins and string BLM 1 ASSESSMENT: Appendix A: Student Projects Appendix B: Student Participation Rubric Appendix C: General Rubric for Written Work LESSON PLAN STEP 1: READING REVIEW PURPOSE: The purpose of this step is to review the reading assignment, tracking Craig’s progress and promoting active class discussions around the plot events and complex social issues addressed in the chapters. STEPS: 1 Map It: As a class, map where Craig has been thus far with pins on the world map. Join any travel experiences by a string. 2 Ask students to describe their initial reactions to the book. 3 Divide the class into pairs and ask pairs to review the assigned chapters and discuss anything they tagged, underlined or wrote in their travel journals. 4 Bring the class back together and generate a discussion around what was discussed in their pairs. At this time identify any important events and quotes from the chapters. 5 Important areas of discussion when reviewing the chapters: The formation of Free The Children, the organization. The story of Iqbal. The struggles and road blocks Craig overcomes as he builds Free The Children. The importance of youth voice. The negative impact labeling and stereotypes can have on youth. Why it is important to stand up for what you believe in. The reasons why Craig chose to travel to South Asia. The dangers and benefits someone (especially a kid) must be aware of when they travel.10
  11. 11. BOOK STUDYSTEP 2: GENREPURPOSE: The purpose of this step is to introduce students to the genre of the book allowing them to becomecomfortable with the structure and purpose of non-fiction memoirs.STEPS:1 Explain to students that genre is the term used for a category of literature. Ask students to make predictions around the genre of Free the Children.2 Tell students that Free the Children is a non-fiction memoir and ask them to explain what this means.3 Following this discussion, explain to students that a non-fiction memoir is: A literary genre. A type of autobiography. Structured by content and is therefore focused and flexible. Written from the first person point of view. An account of how one remembers events in their life. A record of events written by a person having intimate knowledge of them and based on personal observation. Limited to a particular phase, time period or recurring behaviour in order to develop the focus fully.4 Following this explanation, ask students to explain, using examples from the text, why Free the Children is a non-fiction memoir.STEP 3: LITERARY DEVICESPURPOSE: The purpose of this step is to introduce students to the literary devices used in this genre. Students willbecome comfortable with literary elements and literary techniques learning how to identify these devices in the literature.STEPS:1 Tell students that each genre utilizes common literary devices that contribute to the flow and structure of the text. These devices are literary elements and literary techniques.2 Ask students if they can define these devices, writing responses on the board.3 Explain to students that literary elements are found in almost every written piece and work to guide the readers’ interpretation helping them better understand the complexity and overall meaning of the story. Here are examples of literary elements found in non-fiction memoirs: Theme Characterization Setting Point of view Plot4 Moving on, explain to students that literary techniques are constructions in the text, used to express artistic meaning through the use of language. Here are examples of literary techniques found in non-fiction memoirs: Simile Symbolism Metaphor Imagery Paradox Irony Foreshadowing5 Following this discussion, distribute BLM 1 and ask students to write the definitions for each of the devices. 11
  12. 12. FREE THE CHILDREN BY CRAIG KIELBURGER 6 Encourage students to search through the assigned reading and find examples of literary elements and techniques, using quotes and passages to support their findings. 7 Ask students to paste BLM 1 into their journals and track the literary devices they encounter during their reading, recording them on BLM 1 throughout the unit. STEP 4: CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT PURPOSE: The purpose of this step is to familiarize students with the characters in the book, particularly the narrator. STEPS: 1 Explain to students that in a non-fiction memoir, the narrator and the author are the same person. Ask students to identify the narrator in Free the Children (Craig Kielburger). 2 Ask students, if they were going to introduce the main character to someone who has never read the text, what words would they use to describe him? Write the words on the board. 3 Following this discussion, ask students to narrow this list down to the top six describing words they feel represent Craig. 4 Using the first word on the narrowed-down list, ask students to find evidence in the form of a quote, an action or a description in their books that shows that Craig fits this description. Ask students to volunteer their findings. 5 Following this discussion, divide the class into pairs and ask students to search their assigned reading for examples of the other describing words. 6 When pairs have completed their work, ask them to share their examples with the class. 7 Following this, address other characters in the book. Ask students to describe the relationship between these other characters and the narrator, how they interact together and their significance in the narrator’s life. Record student responses on the board. 8 Ask students to be cognizant of new characters that are introduced in the book, taking note of the role they play in Craig’s journey. TAKE HOME Reading assignment: read Chapter 3: Dhaka, Chapter 4: Back to Dhaka and Chapter 5: Bangkok. Encourage students to practice their reading strategies. Travel groups to present next lesson: Dhaka Bangkok Complete any unfinished work.12
  13. 13. BOOK STUDY 13
  14. 14. FREE THE CHILDREN BY CRAIG KIELBURGER LESSON 2: CHAPTER 3: DHAKA, CHAPTER 4: BACK TO DHAKA, CHAPTER 5: BANGKOK PURPOSE: The purpose of this lesson is to review the assigned reading, create concept maps of the events in the book thus far, begin discussions around the topic of child labour and discuss the emotional and intellectual battle the main character experiences. ESTIMATED TIME: 60-75 minute period RESOURCES REQUIRED: Student copies of Free the Children Travel journals World map, pins and string Chart paper ASSESSMENT: Appendix A: Student Projects Appendix B: Student Participation Rubric Appendix C: General Rubric for Written Work LESSON PLAN STEP 1: READING REVIEW PURPOSE: The purpose of this step is to review the reading assignment, track Craig’s progress and promote active class discussions around plot events and complex social issues addressed in the chapters. STEPS: 1 Map It: As a class, map where Craig has been thus far with pins on the world map. Join any travel experiences by a string. 2 Ask the Dhaka and Bangkok travel groups to present. 3 Following the presentations, ask students to describe their reactions to the assigned reading. 4 Encourage students to review the assigned chapters and discuss anything they tagged, underlined or wrote in their travel journals. At this time identify any important events and quotes from the chapters. 5 Important areas of discussion when reviewing the chapter: The events that take place when you first arrive in a new country by plane. The emotions Craig experiences when he first arrives in a new country by himself. Craig’s first encounter with poverty. First impressions of child labour. The different types of child labour and the dangers children face in these working conditions. The different perspectives on child labour. Comparison between Craig’s life and the life of child labourers. The sex trade industry in Patpong, Bangkok.14
  15. 15. BOOK STUDYSTEP 2: CONCEPT MAPSPURPOSE: The purpose of this step is to encourage students to recount the events that have happened thus farin the book and demonstrate an understanding of the connections between literary elements using text specificexamples.STEPS:1 There are many driving forces directing the events of the book. Explain to students that in order to understand the relationships between the elements in the book they will create concept maps.2 Explain that concept maps are diagrams of key terms connected by arrows to link one idea to another. These maps will be based on students’ interpretation of the connections in the book.3 Ask students to create a concept map of one of the following elements in the book: Plot events Characters, their relationships and interactions with one another Social justice issues4 Allow students to begin creating their concept maps.5 Once maps are drawn, divide the class into groups of four and tell students they must justify their connections verbally to their group members.6 Following these small group discussions, bring the class back together and discuss their concept maps and the connections they found in the book.7 Ask students to keep these concept maps in their journals and add to them as they come across other relevant information.STEP 3: CHILD LABOURPURPOSE: The purpose of this step is to initiate discussions around child labour by exploring students’ priorknowledge, newly learned information and seeking evidence on the causes and effects of this social justice issue.STEPS:1 There is one common theme weaved throughout the book, the theme that in the beginning fueled Craig to take action for children’s rights. Ask students to identify this theme (child labour).2 Create a KWL (Know - Want to Know - Learned) chart on chart paper.3 As a class, fill in the columns with information the students know, want to know and have learned about child labour from reading Free the Children. Encourage an active discussion as the chart is being filled in.4 Following this discussion, divide the class into pairs.5 Ask each pair to create a three column chart with the headings “Cause,” “Effect” and “Solution.”6 Tell students to search through the assigned readings and identify causes of child labour, the effects on the people involved and possible solutions posed for this issue. Encourage students to use quotes and page references as supporting evidence.7 When charts are complete, promote an active discussion around child labour and student findings.8 At the conclusion of this discussion, display the KWL chart in the classroom and ask students to record their cause/effect/solution charts in their journals.9 Revisit these resources throughout the remainder of the unit, filling in new information as it is discovered. 15
  16. 16. FREE THE CHILDREN BY CRAIG KIELBURGER STEP 4: THE EMOTIONAL AND INTELLECTUAL BATTLE PURPOSE: The purpose of this step is to discuss the sex trade as encountered in the book and compare the difference between an intellectual and an emotional reaction to such an issue. STEPS: 1 Explain to the students that Craig has seen many difficult things on his trip so far, one issue in particular that Craig struggles with is the sex trade. Ask students to react to everything they learned about the sex trade, eliciting emotional reactions. 2 Craig states: “Intellectually, I thought I could handle it. But emotionally, I wasn’t sure I ever wanted to go near such places” (p. 77). In their journals, ask students to respond to this quote, addressing the difference between an intellectual and an emotional reaction in relation to the sex trade. TAKE HOME Reading assignment: read Chapter 6: Calcutta, Chapter 7: Kathmandu, Chapter 8: Varanasi and Chapter 9: Delhi. Encourage students to practice their reading strategies. Travel groups to present next lesson: Calcutta Kathmandu Varanasi Delhi Complete any unfinished work.16
  17. 17. BOOK STUDY 17
  18. 18. FREE THE CHILDREN BY CRAIG KIELBURGER LESSON 3: CHAPTER 6: CALCUTTA, CHAPTER 7: KATHMANDU, CHAPTER 8: VARANASI, CHAPTER 9: DELHI PURPOSE: The purpose of this lesson is to review the assigned reading, discuss the suffering of child labourers and the chance of rehabilitation. Students will also learn about the power of the media and discuss important social issues in a world council. ESTIMATED TIME: 60-75 minute period RESOURCES REQUIRED: Student copies of Free the Children Travel journals World map, pins and string Paper and writing utensils Computers and internet ASSESSMENT: Appendix A: Student Projects Appendix B: Student Participation Rubric Appendix C: General Rubric for Written Work LESSON PLAN STEP 1: READING REVIEW PURPOSE: The purpose of this step is to review the reading assignment, track Craig’s progress and promote active class discussions around plot events and complex social issues addressed in the chapters. STEPS: 1 Map It: As a class, map where Craig has been thus far with pins on the world map. Join any travel experiences by a string. 2 Ask the Calcutta, Kathmandu, Varanasi and Delhi travel groups to present. 3 Following the presentations, ask students to describe their reactions to the assigned reading. 4 Encourage students to review the assigned chapters and discuss anything they tagged, underlined or wrote in their travel journals. At this time identify any important events and quotes from the chapters. 5 Important areas of discussion when reviewing the chapters: Define the media and describe what happens at a press conference. The purpose of a political demonstration. The cultural games Craig discovers in his travels. The life of Mother Teresa and her impact on society. If rehabilitation is possible after traumatic life experiences. Craig’s growing knowledge of child labour. The geography of South Asia.18
  19. 19. BOOK STUDY The treatment of girls. Munnilal’s story and the role he plays in Craig’s journey. Explanation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.STEP 2: REHABILITATIONPURPOSE: The purpose of this step is to discuss the trials and tribulations of the child labourers in the book and therehabilitation measures these children need to recover from their traumatic experiences.STEPS:1 Ask students to think back to the various child labourers Craig has met thus far in the book. Ask them to reflect on the trials and tribulations these children have endured. Encourage an active discussion around this topic.2 Explain to students that many of the child labourers encountered in the book have endured traumatic experiences. These experiences may cause them mental and physical suffering that has lasting effects they cannot recover from without treatment.3 The topic of rehabilitation is brought up frequently throughout the book. Ask students to define rehabilitation.4 Thinking back to the suffering these children have endured, ask students to discuss whether they feel rehabilitation is possible for these children.5 Ask students to search through the chapters they have read thus far for evidence of rehabilitation programs child labourers have entered.6 Tell students to revisit Munnilal’s story beginning on page 129.7 In pairs, ask students to create a step by step rehabilitation plan for Munnilal now that he has returned home. Encourage students to use evidence of rehabilitation programs found in the book along with any knowledge and research they have of rehabilitation programs.8 Ask students to record their rehabilitation plans in their travel journals.STEP 3: MEDIA ATTENTIONPURPOSE: The purpose of this step is to introduce students to the power of the media through Craig’s experiencein South Asia.STEPS:1 At this point in the book, Craig has begun to attract a great deal of media attention, making news headlines around the world. As a result, Craig is asked to participate in his first press conference on the subject of child labour.2 Encourage students to look back in their books and review page 90-95 to relive the events of the conference. Ask students to explain the events of the conference addressing the goals of the conference and the end results.3 Craig states: “I was now much wiser about the influence of the media. I had discovered just how key a component they are in the struggles for human rights” (p.94). Ask students to respond to this statement using quotes and events from the book as supporting evidence.4 When this discussion is complete, ask students to write a news headline and a 200-word article in their journals from the perspective of a reporter who attended the conference.5 Final articles will be handed in for grading.STEP 4: WORLD COUNCILPURPOSE: The purpose of this step is for students to assume the identity of an inspirational figure and participatein a discussion about world issues, separate from their own personal opinion, encouraging them to see issues fromanother angle. Students will also create a “new world agreement” that they will practice in their own life. 19
  20. 20. FREE THE CHILDREN BY CRAIG KIELBURGER STEPS: 1 In this section of reading, Craig has a monumental encounter with Mother Teresa, humanitarian and advocate for the rights of the poor and helpless. As a class, discuss the contributions Mother Teresa has made to society. 2 Craig later states: “I feel strongly that Mother Teresa’s life has a great message for young people. We so often feel powerless to do anything about the many problems in the world around us. We are so often left to wonder whether one person can possibly make a difference. Mother Teresa said yes, we can. Her life was resounding proof that it is possible” (p.105). Ask students to respond to this quote, addressing the lessons Craig learned from Mother Teresa and the impact this visit had on his life. 3 Ask students to name other inspirational people, explaining they ways they have made an impact on society. Record these names on the board. 4 Divide the class into groups of five-seven students. 5 In their groups, ask each person to select one of the names on the board. Ensure that each member of the group has selected a different person. 6 Explain to students that they are going participate in a World Council! In this council, they will assume the character of their inspirational figure and discuss social justice issues from that person’s perspective. 7 Explain the following suggested structure of the World Council: Groups sit in a circle. Each student begins by introducing themselves to the group, providing background information about their inspirational figure. The teacher introduces a topic of discussion. Groups discuss topics for five minutes in the roles of their inspirational figure. Each student is encouraged to talk at this time. The next topic is introduced. Once each topic has been discussed, each group must work together to create a “new world agreement” based on their discussions. This agreement can have up to six points and consist of values the group agrees to abide by moving forward in order to achieve their vision for society. 8 Before beginning the World Council, allow students to research their inspirational figure, becoming familiar with their core values and personal initiatives. 9 When students have completed their research, ask the groups to gather together in circles and announce the beginning of the World Council. 10 Suggested social justice topics: Child labour Rehabilitation Children’s rights Activism 11 When the World Council is complete, ask each group to summarize their discussions and share their “new world agreement” with the class. 12 Ask students to record their new world agreements in their travel journals. TAKE HOME Reading assignment: read Chapter 10: Karachi and Islamabad and Chapter 11: Lahore. Encourage students to practice their reading strategies. Travel groups to present next lesson: Karachi Islamabad Lahore Complete any unfinished work.20
  21. 21. BOOK STUDY 21
  22. 22. FREE THE CHILDREN BY CRAIG KIELBURGER LESSON 4 CHAPTER 10: KARACHI AND ISLAMABAD, CHAPTER 11: LAHORE PURPOSE: The purpose of this lesson is to review the assigned reading, discuss the role the government plays in important social justice issues and the real power of Iqbal. Students will also begin developing speeches on a children’s rights issue to be presented at the student-led conference. ESTIMATED TIME: 60-75 minute period RESOURCES REQUIRED: Student copies of Free the Children Travel journals World map, pins and string Paper and writing utensils Computers and internet Mural paper Paint Newspapers and magazines ASSESSMENT: Appendix A: Student Projects Appendix B: Student Participation Rubric Appendix C: General Rubric for Written Work Appendix D: Oral Presentation Rubric LESSON PLAN STEP 1: READING REVIEW PURPOSE: The purpose of this step is to review the reading assignment, track Craig’s progress and promote active class discussions around plot events and complex social issues addressed in the chapters. STEPS: 1 Map It: As a class, map where Craig has been thus far with pins on the world map. Join any travel experiences by a string. 2 Ask the Karachi, Islamabad and Lahore travel groups to present. 3 Following the presentations, ask students to describe their reactions to the assigned reading. 4 Encourage students to review the assigned chapters and discuss anything they tagged, underlined or wrote in their travel journals. At this time identify any important events and quotes from the chapters. 5 Important areas of discussion when reviewing the chapters: Ethnic and political unrest. The ways the government can contribute to or put a stop to child labour. The policies Craig wants Canada to adopt to help end child labour. Craig’s experience with Jean Chrétien, the former Prime Minister of Canada. The conflicting stories around Iqbal’s life and how this affects Craig. The process behind child labour, who benefits and who suffers.22
  23. 23. BOOK STUDYSTEP 2: THE ROLE OF THE GOVERNMENTPURPOSE: The purpose of this step is to discuss the role the government plays in human rights issues, like childlabour, and research recent events in history to use as examples of this role.STEPS:1 In this section, Craig questions the role of the government in human rights issues like child labour. In Pakistan, he witnesses ethnic and political unrest and a great discrepancy between the laws that have been established by the government and their motivation to enforce these laws.2 Craig states: “By Pakistan law, child labour was absolutely forbidden in these factories, but in practice the employers were never punished” (p.154). Ask students to respond to this statement and discuss how a country is effected by the governments’ lack of commitment to an issue. Encourage students to use examples from the text to support their responses.3 Following this discussion, address examples of political unrest that have taken place in recent history.4 Ask students to use resources found in the classroom (e.g.: newspapers, magazines and the internet) to perform research around these recent events. Ask students to collect a variety of media sources on these events.5 When students have found a variety of sources, ask them to select one recent event and one media source.6 In their journals, tell students to analyze this event and the role the government played in this upheaval.7 When students have completed their journals, discuss Craig’s meeting with Jean Chrétien, the former Prime Minister of Canada. Ask students to reflect on the requests Craig makes of the Canadian government around the issue of child labour and the result of this meeting.8 From Craig’s experience with Jean Chrétien, discuss the interconnectedness between countries and the impact one country can have on another through their laws and regulations and how this relates to child labour.STEP 3: THE REAL POWER OF IQBALPURPOSE: The purpose of this step is to discuss the events of Iqbal’s life, confronting fraudulent stories andfocusing on the real power of Iqbal.STEPS:1 Craig’s journey for justice began when he came across an article about Iqbal in the newspaper in 1995. Ask students to discuss the significance of this moment and the reasons why Craig connected with this story.2 In this section of reading, Craig investigates Iqbal’s life. While he is doing this, he comes across conflicting messages around the details of Iqbal’s life. Ask students to discuss these details.3 Although Craig is confronted with this confusing information, he concludes Chapter 11 by stating: “That was the real power of Iqbal” (p.188). Ask students to search through the chapter for evidence suggesting this real power and discuss this together as a class.4 When this discussion is complete, explain to students that they are going to create a class mural to demonstrate the real power of Iqbal. This mural should incorporate symbols, themes and events in the book to represent the impact Iqbal had on Craig.5 Set up the materials for the mural (e.g.: mural paper, paints, pencils, etc.) and allow students to begin working together to create the mural.6 When the mural is complete, display the final result in the school so other students can learn the real power of Iqbal. 23
  24. 24. FREE THE CHILDREN BY CRAIG KIELBURGER STEP 4: SPEECH WRITING PURPOSE: The purpose of this step is for students to develop a speech around a children’s rights issue they feel passionate about. These speeches will be presented at the student-led conference in Lesson 7. STEPS: 1 Throughout his experience in South Asia, Craig has the opportunity to speak in front of many audiences about child labour. Through speeches he is able to draw attention to this important issue. 2 Explain to students that they are going to create their own speech on a children’s rights issue they care about. These speeches will be presented in the final lesson of this study during the student-led conference. 3 Based on the children’s rights issues they have encountered in the book thus far, begin by asking students to brainstorm different topics for their speeches. Ask them to write all of their ideas on a piece of paper. 4 After students have brainstormed their ideas, discuss these topics as a class. 5 Encourage students to select one children’s rights issue they care about as the topic of their speech. 6 Once students have chosen their topic, have them create a point form plan for their speech in the following structure: Introduction o Thank the people who allowed you the opportunity to speak, thank the audience for listening and point out any key people who deserve special recognition. o Establish who you are, where you are from and a brief summary of what you will be speaking about—keep this brief. Personal story o Share a personal story relevant to what you are speaking about. This will help the audience relate to you. o Use this as an opportunity to hook the audience and draw them into your speech. Issue awareness o Explain the children’s rights issue to your audience. Use supporting evidence from Free the Children along with statistics, facts and professional opinion. Call to action o Discuss your goals and the personal action you plan to take. o Inspire your audience to take action by listing the top three ways your audience can get involved. Closing o Thank the audience for listening and allow for a question period. 7 All speeches must be 3-4 minutes long. 8 Encourage students to begin working on their speeches. All speeches must be completed for Lesson 7 of the unit plan where a selection, or all, of the speeches will be presented at the student-led conference. TAKE HOME Reading assignment: read Chapter 12: Madras, Chapter 13: Sivakasi and Chapter 14: Cochin and Bombay. Encourage students to practice their reading strategies. Travel groups to present next lesson: Madras Sivakasi Cochin Bombay Complete any unfinished work. Work on children’s rights speeches.24
  25. 25. BOOK STUDY 25
  26. 26. FREE THE CHILDREN BY CRAIG KIELBURGER LESSON 5 CHAPTER 12: MADRAS, CHAPTER 13: SIVAKASI, CHAPTER 14: COCHIN AND BOMBAY PURPOSE: The purpose of this lesson is to review the assigned reading, discuss the caste system in India, create a creative writing piece from the perspective of a child labourer from the book and reflect on Craig’s trip through South Asia as he begins his journey home. ESTIMATED TIME: 60-75 minute period RESOURCES REQUIRED: Student copies of Free the Children Travel journals World map, pins and string Chart paper ASSESSMENT: Appendix A: Student Projects Appendix B: Student Participation Rubric Appendix C: General Rubric for Written Work LESSON PLAN STEP 1: READING REVIEW PURPOSE: The purpose of this step is to review the reading assignment, track Craig’s progress and promote active class discussions around plot events and complex social issues addressed in the chapters. STEPS: 1 Map It: As a class, map where Craig has been thus far with pins on the world map. Join any travel experiences by a string. 2 Ask the Dhaka and Bangkok travel groups to present. 3 Following the presentations, ask students to describe their reactions of the assigned reading. 4 Encourage students to review the assigned chapters and discuss anything they tagged, underlined or wrote in their travel journals. At this time identify any important events and quotes from the chapters. 5 Important areas of discussion when reviewing the chapters: The caste system in India, how it came to be and what it looks like now. The different types of child labour Craig encounters. Craig’s feelings of guilt as he compares his own life to those of the child labourers he meets. Necessary safety precautions on the work site. Why children think they may need the help of adults to stand up for an issue like child labour. The advice given to Craig by Alam at the end of the trip. Craig’s feelings as he concludes his travels and returns home. The difficulty Craig might encounter when he returns home after his experience.26
  27. 27. BOOK STUDYSTEP 2: THE CASTE SYSTEMPURPOSE: The purpose of this step is to learn about the caste system in India. Students will discuss how thissegregation contributes to child labour and address what this type of segregation would look like in their owncommunity through a role play activity.STEPS:1 In this section, Craig learns about the caste system, a pronounced social order in India. The caste system consists of the following groups: Brahmins: literate, the “priests” who perform the intellectual and ritual tasks Kshatriyas: the soldiers and administrators Vaishyas: the artisans and commercial class Sudras: the peasants and farmers, the lowest official level The Untouchables: outside the class structure. It is believed they were actually the indigenous inhabitants of India. Many centuries ago, the conquering peoples had reduced them to slavery and assigned them a separate class in society.2 Craig states: “We quickly saw in the children the one thing they had in common—they were almost all from the lowest ranks of society” (p.181).3 Ask students to search through the assigned reading for evidence of the segregation caused by this caste system and discuss this evidence among the class.4 Once students are familiar with the caste system, divide the class into groups of four to six.5 In their groups, ask students to use their creativity and create a role play incorporating the caste system into a scenario from their own community. Characters in the role play will play different groups from the caste system and students will reveal who belonged to what group when the role play is complete.6 After each group has presented their role play, encourage an active discussion around the caste system.STEP 3: CHILD LABOURERSPURPOSE: The purpose of this step is to look back on the child labourers Craig has met throughout his journey.Students will write a creative writing piece of the perspective of one child labourer.STEPS:1 Craig encounters many child labourers in this section. Ask students to review their reading and identify some of these child labourers.2 Ask students to discuss the children’s stories as the class. Talk about the causes, effects, possible solutions to their situation And the feelings of the child.3 Following this discussion, ask students to select one child labourer that they connect with.4 Once this child is selected, ask students to write a creative writing piece, telling the child’s life story from their own perspective. In this story students must address their feelings, misfortunes and hopes.5 Students will write their stories in their travel journals and hand them in for grading. 27
  28. 28. FREE THE CHILDREN BY CRAIG KIELBURGER STEP 4: THE JOURNEY HOME PURPOSE: The purpose of this step is to reflect on Craig’s trip and discuss the prospect of coming home to Canada after such an experience. STEPS: 1 Ask students to reflect on the customs, foods, traditions and ways of life different from Craig’s that he grew accustomed to on his trip. Make a list of these differences on the board. 2 Have students put themselves in Craig’s shoes and imagine what he felt like after spending seven weeks immersed in South Asian culture. 3 Now have students imagine what it would feel like to come home to Canada, to his family, friends and fortunate upbringing. Ask students to describe how Craig would feel at this time, using evidence from the book to support their answers. 4 Tell students that Craig needs help reintegrating back into his home life. He needs help overcoming feelings of guilt, learning how to tell his loved ones about his experience, how to embrace normal life in Grade 8 and how to move forward with Free The Children. Often, if this is not done properly, a person can come to feel helpless and alienated from their normal life. 5 Divide the class into groups of two -four. 6 It is important that Craig does not forget all of the lessons he learned on his trip. Ask each group to create a reintegration plan for Craig. In this plan they must list ideas and strategies that can help him overcome culture shock and allow him to embrace his life at home, they must also include the steps he should take moving forward with Free The Children and the ways he can bring the lessons from his trip into his daily life. 7 When their work is complete, discuss the reintegration plans as a class. TAKE HOME Reading assignment: read Chapter 15: Thornhill and Bombay and Chapter 16: What is childhood? Encourage students to practice their reading strategies. Complete any unfinished work. Work on children’s rights speeches.28
  29. 29. BOOK STUDY 29
  30. 30. FREE THE CHILDREN BY CRAIG KIELBURGER LESSON 6 CHAPTER 15: THORNHILL AND BOMBAY, CHAPTER 16: WHAT IS CHILDHOOD? PURPOSE: The purpose of this lesson is to review the assigned reading, discuss the changes that occurred within Craig along his journey, learn about present day Free The Children and reflect on the meaning of childhood. ESTIMATED TIME: 60-75 minute period RESOURCES REQUIRED: Student copies of Free the Children Travel journals World map, pins and string Chart paper ASSESSMENT: Appendix A: Student Projects Appendix B: Student Participation Rubric Appendix C: General Rubric for Written Work LESSON PLAN STEP 1: READING REVIEW PURPOSE: The purpose of this step is to review the reading assignment, track Craig’s progress and promote active class discussions around plot events and complex social issues addressed in the chapters. STEPS: 1 Map It: As a class, map where Craig has been thus far with pins on the world map. Join any travel experiences by a string. 2 Ask the Dhaka and Bangkok travel groups to present. 3 Following the presentations, ask students to describe their reactions of the assigned reading. 4 Encourage students to review the assigned chapters and discuss anything they tagged, underlined or wrote in their travel journals. At this time identify any important events and quotes from the chapters. 5 Important areas of discussion when reviewing the chapters: Craig’s reflections now that he is home in Canada. Everyone’s reactions to Craig’s return home. Free The Children’s accomplishments since Craig’s return home. The meaning of childhood. The goals and values of Free The Children. The struggles youth experience all over the world. The steps Craig plans to take moving forward. What Free The Children looks like today.30
  31. 31. BOOK STUDYSTEP 2: PRE AND POST ASIAPURPOSE: The purpose of this step is for students to recognize the differences in Craig pre-Asia and post-Asia.Students will recognize the growth and learning Craig has experienced.STEPS:1 Following his trip, Craig states: “I divide my life into pre-Asia and post-Asia…The trip had a profound effect on me, one that changed me forever” (p.231). Ask students to discuss what Craig means by this quote.2 Ask students to revisit the chapters before Craig left on his trip to Asia. In their journals ask them to create a chart with the headings “Pre” and “Post”. Using point form notes compare and contrast Craig before his trip and after his trip. Encourage students to use evidence from the book to support their answers.3 When students have completed their charts, ask them to compare their findings with a partner, discussing how Craig has grown throughout the book.STEP 3: FREE THE CHILDRENPURPOSE: The purpose of this step is for students to learn about Free The Children today and recognize thelasting effect Craig’s trip to Asia has had on the organization.STEPS:1 Craig learns a wealth of valuable lessons on his trip through South Asia that he plans to bring back with him to Canada. Ask students to recount some of these lessons.2 Explain to students that many of the lessons Craig learned on his trip are still reflected in Free The Children today. They are a large part of the reason why Free The Children has been able to help thousands of children around the world.3 Ask students to explore the Free The Children website (www.freethechildren.com) and find five examples of a program, philosophy or value embraced by the organization today that is the result of something Craig learned on his trip to South Asia years ago.STEP 4: THE MEANING OF CHILDHOODPURPOSE: The purpose of this step is for students to reflect on the idea of childhood as it is reflected in Free the Children.STEPS:1 A large theme throughout Free the Children is the idea of childhood. We came across many depictions of childhood as we viewed South Asia through the eyes of Craig. Together, we learned about cultural practices, we encountered social justice issues and we met child labourers. In chapter 16 Craig gives his insight on childhood.2 Ask students to review chapter 16 and recall events from the book and provide explanations behind the meaning of childhood. Discuss findings as a class and encourage debate around this topic.3 When this discussion is complete ask students to write a reflection in their journals around their opinion on the meaning of childhood. TAKE HOME Reading assignment: read Chapter 10: Karachi and Islamabad and Chapter 11: Lahore. Encourage students to practice their reading strategies. Travel groups to present next lesson: Karachi and Islamabad Lahore Complete any unfinished work. 31
  32. 32. FREE THE CHILDREN BY CRAIG KIELBURGER LESSON 7: STUDENT-LED CONFERENCE PURPOSE: The purpose of this lesson is for students to summarize their learning, discuss important social issues and present their work from this unit of study by organizing a student-led conference. ESTIMATED TIME: 60-75 minute period RESOURCES REQUIRED: Chart paper Student work ASSESSMENT: Appendix A: Student Projects Appendix B: Student Participation Rubric Appendix C: General Rubric for Written Work Appendix D: Oral Presentation Rubric LESSON PLAN STEP 1: PURPOSE OF THE CONFERENCE 1 After Craig returns home from South Asia, he dreams of hosting an international conference to bring youth leaders together to share their experiences and ideas and discuss suggestions on how to involve young people in the decision-making process. 2 Explain to students that they are going to organize a student-led conference on issues they learned about throughout this unit of study. The purpose is for students to demonstrate their learning throughout the unit while raising awareness on important social issues. 3 Students must divide responsibilities among themselves, but the conference will be a class effort, encouraging them to work together and support each other. They also have the opportunity to invite guests, such as other classes, parents or community members, to watch their conference. STEP 2: PLANNING 1 The conference will be divided into five sections: Background information on the unit of study. Speeches on a variety of topics addressed during the unit. Demonstrations of class work and information learned throughout the unit. Active debates. Revealing short-term and long-term goals. 2 Each student must participate in two of the five areas and they can organize the conference schedule however they wish. 3 The following are the steps students must follow to plan the conference: Determine what they would like to accomplish with this conference and what they would like their audience to gain from this experience. Decide on what speeches should be presented. (These speeches were started in Lesson 4: Chapter 10: Karachi and Islamabad and Chapter 11: Lahore. Either ask all students to present or select a few students.)32
  33. 33. BOOK STUDY Determine the work and information from the unit to display at the conference and how to explain it. Decide on the debate topics (there should be a minimum of two, five-minute debates). Discuss short-term and long-term goals to be revealed at the conclusion of the conference. Estimate length of the conference and timing allotted to each area. Plan the order of the conference.4 Once students have decided on the topics and materials for the conference, they must determine the roles and responsibilities of each class member. Once this is done, students can move onto the creation phase.STEP 3: CREATING1 When students have decided on their roles and responsibilities, encourage them to break up into their sub- groups and begin their creating.2 Encourage the class to touch base throughout the creation stage for additional support and to confirm everyone is on track.STEP 4: EXECUTING1 When all work has been completed, host a practice conference to prepare for the event.2 Ask students to invite all appropriate guests.3 Ensure all materials are in order before the conference begins.STEP 5: REFLECTING1 Reflect on the events of the conference and what students have learned throughout the book study through an active discussion.2 Ask students to write a final reflection in their journals answering the following suggested statements: What did you learn from Craig during this book study? What did you learn about social justice issues such as children’s rights? What stood out to you during this book study? Why is it important to help others? Explain your personal journey throughout this book study. What message would you like to tell others about something you learned during this book study? What action steps will you take following this book study to give back to your global community?3 When students have completed their reflections, ask them to hand their travel journals in for grading. 33
  34. 34. FREE THE CHILDREN BY CRAIG KIELBURGERBlackline Masters & Appendices34
  35. 35. BL M 1Literary DevicesLiterary elements Definition Example 1 Example 2 Example 3 Example 4 ThemeCharacterization Setting Point of view PlotLiterary elements Definition Example 1 Example 2 Example 3 Example 4 Simile Symbolism Metaphor Imagery Paradox IRONYFORESHADOWING 35
  36. 36. A IX NDPEAP Student Projects Title of project: Student name: Performance Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Factors Produces work Produces good Produces quality Produces high with limited quality work. work. quality work. Producing quality. quality work Sometimes Sometimes on Consistently Always remains on task, task, showing remains on task, on task, showing Using work showing limited inconsistent showing respect exemplary time effectively observance of observance of to boundaries adherence to boundaries and boundaries and and rules. boundaries and rules. rules. rules. Demonstrates Demonstrates Demonstrates Demonstrates limited some considerable thorough Knowledge knowledge and knowledge and knowledge and knowledge and of topic understanding understanding understanding understanding of concepts. of concepts. of concepts. of concepts. Expresses and Expresses and Expresses Expresses organizes ideas organizes ideas and organizes and organizes Communicating and information and information ideas and ideas and effectively with limited with some information with information with effectiveness. effectiveness. considerable a high degree of effectiveness. effectiveness. Presents a Presents a Presents a Presents a fresh predictable somewhat somewhat and original response to the predictable original idea. idea. Originality topic. response to the topic. 36
  37. 37. AP PE ND IX BStudent Participation RubricTitle of project:Student name: Criteria Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Sometimes on task Consistently on task Always on task Inconsistent Respect boundaries Exemplary adherence Behaviour observance of and rules to boundaries and boundaries and rules rules Sometimes brings Consistently brings Always prepared with required materials to required materials to required materials class class Always ready to Inconsistently engages Consistently ready engage in daily Preparedness in classroom activities to engage in daily classroom activities Inconsistently classroom activities Exemplary completes Consistently completes effort displayed assignments on a assignments on timely in completing timely basis basis assignments Inconsistent Active participation in Consistent leader of participation in classroom activities classroom activities classroom activities Willing to volunteer Always volunteers to Classroom Unwilling to volunteer answers to questions, answers questions, interaction to answer questions, read aloud, etc. read aloud, etc. read aloud, etc. Displays inconsistent Displays positive Displays an exemplary attitude attitude and consistent attitude Sometimes unwilling Willing to accept Graciously accepts Attitude to accept feedback feedback feedback and is able Finds it difficult to Willing to work with to use it constructively work with others others Is always willing to work with others 37
  38. 38. C IX NDPEAP General Rubric for Written Work Title of project: Student name: Criteria Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Demonstrates Demonstrates Demonstrates Demonstrates limited some considerable thorough Knowledge/ knowledge and knowledge and knowledge and knowledge and Understanding understanding of understanding of understanding of understanding of concepts concepts concepts concepts Planning, Planning, Planning, Planning, processing and processing and processing and processing Thinking/ critical thinking critical thinking critical thinking and critical Inquiry skills are applied skills are applied skills are applied thinking skills are with limited with some with considerable applied with a effectiveness effectiveness effectiveness high degree of effectiveness Expresses and Expresses and Expresses and Expresses organizes ideas organizes ideas organizes ideas and organizes and information and information and information ideas and Communication with limited with some with considerable information with effectiveness effectiveness effectiveness a high degree of effectiveness Predictions and Predictions and Predictions and Predictions and connections connections connections connections between contexts between between contexts between contexts Application made with limited contexts made made with made with a effectiveness with moderate considerable high degree of effectiveness effectiveness effectiveness 38
  39. 39. AP PE ND IX DOral Presentation RubricTitle of project:Student name: Nonverbal Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Skills No eye contact with Minimal eye contact Consistent use of eye Holds attention of audience, entire report with audience, reading contact with audience, audience with use of Eye contact is read from notes mostly from notes but still refers to notes direct eye contact , seldom refers to notes No movement or Very little movement or Made movements or Movements seem fluid Body descriptive gestures descriptive gestures gestures that enhanced and help the audience language articulation visualize Tension and Displays mild tension Displays little to no tension Displays relaxed, self- nervousness is obvious Has trouble recovering Makes minor mistakes, confident nature with no Poise Has trouble recovering from mistakes but quickly recovers mistakes from mistakes from them Verbal Skills Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Shows no interest in Shows some negativity Occasionally shows Demonstrates strong topic toward topic enthusiasm toward topic enthusiasm toward topic Enthusiasm Student mumbles, Student’s voice is low, Student’s voice is clear, Student uses a incorrectly pronounces pronounces terms they pronounce most clear voice. correct Elocution terms, and speaks too incorrectly and volume words correctly and pronunciation of terms quietly is inconsistent volume is good and volume is excellent Content Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 No grasp of information Student is uncomfortable Student is at ease with Student demonstrates full Student cannot answer with the information expected answers to all knowledge by answering Subject questions about the Student is able to questions all class questions knowledge subject answer only rudimentary with explanations and questions elaborations There is no sequence of There is poor sequence Information is presented Information is presented information of organization in a logical sequence in a logical andOrganization interesting sequence Presentation has four Presentation has some Presentation has few Presentation has no or more spelling and/or spelling and grammar spelling and grammar spelling or grammar Mechanics grammar errors errors errors errors 39
  40. 40. N TIO AC KETA EMPOWERING STUDENTS TO TAKE ACTION An innovative social enterprise, Me to We provides people with socially conscious and environmentally friendly clothes and accessories, as well as life-changing international volunteer trips, leadership training programs and materials, an inspirational speakers bureau, and books which address issues of positive social change. In addition, half of Me to We’s net profit is donated to Free The Children, while the other half is reinvested to grow the enterprise and its social mission. Me to We takes pride in measuring the bottom line, not by dollars earned, but by the number of lives changed and the positive social and environmental impacts made. Do your students feel like they now have all this information about challenging global issues but don’t know how to make a difference? Me to We’s partner in social change, Free The Children, is an educational partner that helps empower students to use their knowledge to change the world. Free The Children’s youth-led campaigns bring together the awareness of global issues that students gain from books and book studies like this one, with step-by-step action plans. From simple bake sales to a 24-hour vow of silence, students raise awareness and funds to support community development projects overseas. Through their fundraising efforts, students will learn important leadership skills, bring together the student body for common causes, and know that their actions are making a difference in their community and around the world. 40
  41. 41. TA KE AC TIO NANNUAL CAMPAIGNS Collect canned goods instead of candy this On November 30, join young people Halloween to donate to local food banks around the world who pledge to stay silent and help fight hunger in your community. for 24 hours to support children who are silenced by the denial of their basic rights. For the month of February, learn more about Mobilize your community in a week of the challenges and possibilities surrounding action and fundraise for five days to help education for Aboriginal youth. free children from the injustices that take away their rights. Wrap up a thrilling week by hosting your own Freedom Fest to celebrate your hard work. THREE WAYS TO GET INVOLVED: 1. Sign up online at www.freethechildren.com 2. Like We Day on Facebook at www.facebook.com/weday 3. Contact a youth programming coordinator at youth@freethechildren.com 41
  42. 42. N TIO AC KETA ADOPT A VILLAGE CAMPAIGN KITS Keep track of your fundraising and awareness efforts with Free The Children’s three campaign kits. These kits provide young people with the tools they need to stay focused, establish and meet clear goals, raise awareness about social and global issues, as well as celebrate their achievements as young leaders and activists. When students sign up for any of these three kits, they choose the specific country they want to support. Free The Children sends a campaign kit, including a wall-sized poster to track fundraising progress and a step-by-step guide to the campaign. The campaign kits work hand-in-hand with schools’ year-long fundraising and awareness goals. Brick by Brick Clean Water Alternative Income This school building campaign kit With this kit, students will learn that With this kit, young people can shows young people how valuable contaminated drinking water keeps help to empower mothers living in and rare their education really is. They millions of kids out of school, that, poverty support their families. This learn about the more than 120 million globally, 443 million school days kind of support helps break the children around the world who are are missed because of some kind cycle of poverty. Students will learn denied the basic right to an education. of water-related illness and that it is that when women are able to earn a They learn the connections between traditionally the job of young girls good living, they can send their kids getting a good education and to collect water from the nearest to school instead of work, opening a having a standard of health, resisting river each day, which can often result whole world of possibility. exploitation and earning enough in hours of walking, forcing them money to escape the cycle of poverty. to miss school. Students will learn how and why the water problem is a significant barrier to education. Visit www.freethechildren.com/youth or www.freethechildren.com/ educator for more information. Contact youth@freethchildren.com to get in touch with one of our youth programming coordinators. 42
  43. 43. TA KE AC TIO NME TO WE IN YOUR CLASSROOMIn addition to the Free the Children Book Study, Me to We offers amazing opportunities for you and your students todive into life in Kenya and explore global issues right in your class!A Novel Study: My Maasai Life by Robin Wiszowaty is a resource guide created to help high school educators exploreMy Maasai Life by Robin Wiszowaty with their students. This unit plan will help engross students in Robin’s journey to selfdiscovery, while educating them about culture, social issues, African traditions, struggles and triumphs, family, communityand international development.The Global Voices Resource Guide is a teaching tool for educators of Grades 7-12. This guide gives educators thestructure and tools necessary to help their students get the most out of the columns in Global Voices: The Compilation.These resources work together to organize the knowledge and skills students need to become literate in four strands:oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy. The reading materials expose students to a range of globalissues while the lessons and activities cater to a variety of learning styles.To learn more about My Maasai Life and other titles, contact us at store@metowe.com or visit www.metowe.com.IN YOUR CLASSROOM AND BEYOND!Me to We opens your classroom to a world where social change is everywhere. Within your classroom, Me to We books,manuals and biographies will inspire, educate and enlighten. At your school, our energetic team of speakers will ignitea passion for change in your students. Our ethically made Me to We clothing is already outfitting many world-changingschool efforts, teams and clubs. And at our permanent leadership centres, at our annual leadership academies and onour overseas volunteer trips, Me to We is bringing experiential learning to thousands of youth.With half of Me to We’s net profit donated to Free The Children and the other half reinvested to grow the enterprise and its socialmission, your school’s involvement with Me to We sets an example of global citizenship and philanthropy through education. 43
  44. 44. Free The Children Me to We233 Carlton Street 225 Carlton StreetToronto, ON Toronto, ONM5A 2L2 Canada M5A 2L2 CanadaTel: 416.925.5894 Tel: 416.964.8942Fax: 1.416.925.8242 Fax: 416.964.2199E-mail: info@freethechildren.com E-mail: info@metowe.comWeb: www.freethechildren.com Web: www.metowe.comFree The Children is the world’s largest network of Me to We is an innovative social enterprise that pro-children helping children through education, with vides people with better choices for a better world.more than one million youth involved in our innova- Through socially conscious and environmentallytive programs in more than 45 countries. The or- friendly products and life-changing experiences,ganization works to engage and empower youth at Me to We measures the bottom line, not by dollarsthe domestic level to become active global citizens. earned, but by the number of lives we change andInternationally, Free The Children has built more than the positive social and environmental impact we650 schools and school rooms, providing education to make. In addition, half of Me to We’s net profit isover 55,000 children every day. donated to Free The Children and the other half is reinvested to grow the enterprise and its social mission.

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