Day 4_Session I_Critical Thinking

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Day 4_Session I_Critical Thinking

  1. 1. Defining Critical Thinking There are several definitions that are accepted in discussing critical thinking skills. Scrivner and Paul (1992) define critical thinking as the intellectually disciplined process of actively and skillfully conceptualizing, applying, analyzing, synthesizing and/or evaluating information gathered from or generated by observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or communication as a guide to belief and action. In its exemplary form, it is based on universal intellectual values that transcend subject matter: clarity, accuracy, precision, consistency, relevance, sound evidence, good reasons, depth, breadth and fairness. A way of reasoning that demands adequate support of one’s beliefs and an unwillingness to be persuaded unless support is forthcoming (Tama 1989) A conscious and deliberate effort process which is used to interpret or evaluate information and experiences with a set of reflective attitudes and abilities that guide thoughtful beliefs and action. (Mertes, 1991) Ennis (1992) defines critical thinking as simply reasonable, reflective thinking focused on deciding what to believe or do. The ability to analyze facts, generate and organize ideas, defend opinions, make comparisons, draw inferences, evaluate arguments and solve problems. (Chance, 1986)

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