Increasing Reading Confidence:Deciphering a Text for Literal and Implied Ideas<br />Facilitator:  ShaVon C. Myles<br />
Objective(s):<br />To share practical reading strategies and learning principles. <br />To distinguish the strategic reade...
REFLECT<br />Consider the following questions:<br />What are common reactions from students when prompted to read a text?<...
Distinguishing Types of Readers<br />Dependent/<br />Reluctant Readers<br />sees unfamiliar words as a barriers<br />speed...
Teacher’s Role  - Tip 1<br />For students’ success in reading, teachers should:<br />increase students’ awareness of basic...
Teacher’s Role   -   Tip 2<br />For students’ success in reading, teachers should:<br />have high expectations for student...
Reading Strategy 1: The Chunking Process<br />Materials:  <br />Copy a page of a text or use adhesive post-it strips.<br /...
Steps ofThe Chunking Process<br />**First, understand that a “chunk” of <br />text is a clearly defined paragraph or <br /...
Steps ofThe Chunking Process<br />Step 2:  Begin to read.  Briefly pauseat the end of each identified chunk to analyze wha...
Steps ofThe Chunking Process<br />Step 3:  Jot down ideas and questions that arise during the pause in reading in the marg...
Excerpt to ModelThe Chunking Process<br />Excerpt from “Accident” by Dave Eggers<br />“You exchange insurance information,...
Dissecting a Text for Literaland Implied Ideas<br />Less strategic readers often seek out only literal ideas in a text.<br...
Teaching Students how to Make Inferences<br />look for pronouns to make connections<br />think about the setting to see wh...
Identifying Literal and Implied Ideas<br />Read the following brief excerpt.<br />Identify literal ideas.<br />Identify im...
What were some Literal and Implied Ideas in the Excerpt?<br />Implied Ideas<br />Date (person next to him)<br />Cashier (w...
Closure<br />Collectively, teachers and students must work toward developing strategic readers.<br />
Resources<br />Institute for Learning<br />http://ifl.lrdc.pitt.edu<br />When Kids Can’t Read: What Teachers Can Do<br />b...
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Day 2_Session I_Critical Reading Powerpoint #2

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Day 2_Session I_Critical Reading Powerpoint #2

  1. 1. Increasing Reading Confidence:Deciphering a Text for Literal and Implied Ideas<br />Facilitator: ShaVon C. Myles<br />
  2. 2. Objective(s):<br />To share practical reading strategies and learning principles. <br />To distinguish the strategic reader from the dependent/reluctant reader.<br />
  3. 3. REFLECT<br />Consider the following questions:<br />What are common reactions from students when prompted to read a text?<br />Can most students distinguish literal and implied ideas in a text?<br />If a student had the opportunity to select a book to read what would be its content and features?<br />
  4. 4. Distinguishing Types of Readers<br />Dependent/<br />Reluctant Readers<br />sees unfamiliar words as a barriers<br />speed reads<br />is disengaged<br />is hesitant to read and discuss literature<br />constantly rereads<br />seeks the obvious<br />Strategic Reader<br />uses context clues<br />reads actively<br />pauses and reflects<br />questions the text/author<br />uses prior knowledge<br />makes inferences<br />predicts<br />possesses confidence<br />
  5. 5. Teacher’s Role - Tip 1<br />For students’ success in reading, teachers should:<br />increase students’ awareness of basic literary terms associated with analyzing a text:<br />inference, predict, implied, clarify,<br />evaluate, connect, literal, visualize<br />Accountable Talk (Principles of Learning) – promotes connectivity and confidence in students<br />
  6. 6. Teacher’s Role - Tip 2<br />For students’ success in reading, teachers should:<br />have high expectations for students<br />know and respond to students’ needs<br />model reading strategies<br />encourage students to use reading strategies independently<br />
  7. 7. Reading Strategy 1: The Chunking Process<br />Materials: <br />Copy a page of a text or use adhesive post-it strips.<br />pen/pencil<br />Purpose: To stress the importance of pausing and reflecting on a text during reading.<br />Results: Encourages student response to literature and elicits interest in a text.<br />
  8. 8. Steps ofThe Chunking Process<br />**First, understand that a “chunk” of <br />text is a clearly defined paragraph or <br />5-6 lines of text.<br />Step 1: Survey a page of text to <br />determine pause points (chunks). If <br />possible, make a mark beside each <br />chunk. (Focus on one page at a time.)<br />
  9. 9. Steps ofThe Chunking Process<br />Step 2: Begin to read. Briefly pauseat the end of each identified chunk to analyze what was just read.<br />During each pause, the reader <br />engages in at least one of the following <br />processes: questioning, clarifying, <br />predicting, evaluating, connecting, <br />or visualizing.<br />
  10. 10. Steps ofThe Chunking Process<br />Step 3: Jot down ideas and questions that arise during the pause in reading in the margin on the copy of the reading selection or on the post-it strip. Place the annotated post-it strip near the respective chunk in the textbook.<br />
  11. 11. Excerpt to ModelThe Chunking Process<br />Excerpt from “Accident” by Dave Eggers<br />“You exchange insurance information, and you find yourself, minute by minute, ever more thankful that none of these teenagers has punched you, or even made a remark about your being drunk, which you are not, or being stupid, which you are, often. You become more friendly with all of them, and you realize that you are much more connected to them, particularly to the driver, than possible in perhaps any other way.”<br />
  12. 12. Dissecting a Text for Literaland Implied Ideas<br />Less strategic readers often seek out only literal ideas in a text.<br />Students should know that:<br />Literal = What you see is what you get.<br />Implied = Find what else in our world can connect to the statements (The reader must make inferences to identify implied ideas.)<br />
  13. 13. Teaching Students how to Make Inferences<br />look for pronouns to make connections<br />think about the setting to see what details the reader could add<br />use prior knowledge<br />try to explain the characters’ behavior<br />recognize connotations of words<br />chart sample literal and implied ideas from students<br />
  14. 14. Identifying Literal and Implied Ideas<br />Read the following brief excerpt.<br />Identify literal ideas.<br />Identify implied ideas.<br /> “He put down $10.00 at the window. The woman behind the window gave $4.00. The person next to him gave him $3.00, but he gave it back to her. So, when they went inside, she bought him a large popcorn.” <br />
  15. 15. What were some Literal and Implied Ideas in the Excerpt?<br />Implied Ideas<br />Date (person next to him)<br />Cashier (woman behind the window with money)<br />Movies (popcorn)<br />Nice guy (returns money)<br />Thoughtful girl (buys popcorn)<br />Paying for something ($10.00 given and received $4.00)<br />Literal Ideas<br />A person is next to another person<br />A woman is<br /> behind a window and handling money<br />Popcorn is bought<br />Money is exchanged<br />
  16. 16. Closure<br />Collectively, teachers and students must work toward developing strategic readers.<br />
  17. 17. Resources<br />Institute for Learning<br />http://ifl.lrdc.pitt.edu<br />When Kids Can’t Read: What Teachers Can Do<br />by Kylene Beers<br />College Knowledge<br />by David T. Conley<br />

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