Foundations+Of+Electricity+And+Magnetism[1]

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  • When the differential forms of these laws are taken together, they predict a transverse, electromagnetic wave that propagates at approximately 3 hundred million meters per second, better known as the speed of light.
  • Foundations+Of+Electricity+And+Magnetism[1]

    1. 1. Foundations of Electricity and Magnetism<br />Michael Faraday<br />&<br />James Clerk Maxwell<br />
    2. 2. Michael Faraday<br />
    3. 3. Biography<br />Michael Faraday was born in Newington, Surrey, on the 22nd of September 1791.<br />As a young man, he was apprenticed to a bookbinder.<br />In March,1813, Faraday was appointed assistant of the Royal Institution of Great Britain.<br />
    4. 4. In 1825, Faraday was appointed director of the Institute’s Laboratory.<br />He became a Fullerian professor at the Institute in 1833.<br />He served at the Royal Institute for fifty-four years before dying in August, 1867.<br />
    5. 5. Discoveries<br />Discovered two Chlorides of Carbon.<br />His most noted discovery was that electric currents could be induced by varying magnetic fields, which later led to Faraday’s Law of Induction.<br />
    6. 6. Legacy<br />Faraday’s name serves as a unit of electric charge (Faraday) and as the SI unit for capacitance (Farad).<br />One device that bears the name Faraday is a cage made of conductive material used to protect objects from static fields.<br />
    7. 7. James Clerk Maxwell<br />
    8. 8. Biography<br />Maxwell was born on 13 June 1831 in Edinburgh.<br />Maxwell’s early education took place at the prestigious Edinburgh Academy.<br />He began attending lectures at the University of Edinburgh at the age of 16.<br />He left Edinburgh in 1850 and began attending Cambridge University.<br />
    9. 9. In 1856, Maxwell began teaching at Aberdeen University, lecturing 15 hours a week.<br />In 1861, he was inducted into the Royal Society, where he befriended Michael Faraday.<br />Maxwell died in November 1879 of stomach cancer.<br />
    10. 10. The Equations<br />Gauss’ Law of Magnetism<br />Gauss’ Law of Electricity<br />Faraday’s Law of Induction<br />Ampere’s Law<br />
    11. 11. Legacy<br />Maxwell’s discovery of the coincidence of the E&M equations led to the “Wave-Theory of Light”, Einstein’s discovery of Relativistic Mechanics, and the discovery of the Wave-Particle duality of Light and Matter.<br />
    12. 12. Citations<br />Cook, J. (Artist). Michael faraday. [Web]. Retrieved from http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3a00245 <br />James Clerk Maxwell. Wikipedia. Retrieved (2010, February 8) from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Clerk_Maxwell <br />James clerk maxwell. [Web]. Retrieved from http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/57/James_Clerk_Maxwell.png <br />Michael faraday,1791-1867. [Web]. Retrieved from http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3b15501<br />Michael Faraday. (1911). Encyclopedia britannica. Retrieved (2010, February 8) from http://www.1911encyclopedia.org/Michael_Faraday <br />

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