Introduction To Behavioral Design

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A presentation intended for social designers, social marketers and change agents who want to assist people in learning new behaviors rather than trying to change them.

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  • It’s important to them at the moment (fits preconceptions, interests)It moves them emotionallyNot too complicatedIts ubiquitous or frequentFind it useful to solve a problem – cope with the environment
  • Can convert information to images and easily used words, phrases, slogans.Can create ‘rules’ – “do this when…” - or a prototype behavior (eat 5 a day)Learn to talk themselves through situations, feelings, etcRehearse it – mentally (cognitively) or in practice
  • They can see themselves doing itHave opportunities to practice it (get better at it)Have the necessary component skills to do it (with biological and physical constraints)Get feedback (intrinsic and extrinsic) – making the unobservable observable (performance feedback)
  • Not acting on what we learn most often happens when the new behavior has little functional value or carries a high risk of punishment.Performing the new behavior results fro three types of incentives – the allure of direct, tangible rewards; observed or vicarious rewards – experiencing it though others; and self-produced ones.Behaviors are more likely to occur when they are met with valued outcomes – material benefits, sensory stimulation, positive or negative social reactions, reward of efficacy in controlling events (feeling in control of things).
  • What’s the desirable or aspirational behavior versus what’s relevant and possible in their lifeUnderstand what is the extraordinarily normalCreate contours and context for behaviorsBe slightly ‘off’ – gradually learn the rules and shape the behavior (coping vs mastery models)Make observable features (self-monitoring)Use other media to surround, permeate and be a continual presence
  • Introduction To Behavioral Design

    1. 1. Design Thinking and Behavior Change: Take One<br /> R. Craig Lefebvre, PhD <br /> chief maven, socialShift<br />Research Professor, George Washington University School of Public Health & Health Services<br />
    2. 2. Design Thinking and Behavior Change: Take One<br />This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA.<br />
    3. 3. Orienting Principles<br />Design thinking for behavior change focuses on helping people learn new behaviors, not enabling us to change their current ones.<br />Behavior is designed by genetic, biological, physical, psychological, social, economic, technological, environmental and cultural forces.<br />Design thinking must capture and reflect how learning occurs in the natural contours of people’s lives.<br />Products, services, policies, programs and communication serve to improve, support and sustain learning and behavior – or not!<br />
    4. 4. How People Learn Most of the Time<br />
    5. 5. New Technologies Expand The Scope and Capacity for Learning<br />Modeling: People learn from what they see others doing and observing the consequences of those actions.<br />
    6. 6. Why do people pay attention?<br />
    7. 7. Why do people pay attention?<br />It’s important to them at the moment (fits preconceptions, interests).<br />It moves them emotionally.<br />Not too complicated.<br />It is ubiquitous or frequent.<br />They find it useful to solve a problem – cope with the environment.<br />
    8. 8. Why do people remember it?<br />
    9. 9. Why do people remember it?<br /> Can convert information to images and easily used words, phrases, slogans.<br /> Can create ‘rules’ – “do this when…” - or a prototype behavior (eat 5 a day).<br /> Learn to talk themselves through situations, feelings, etc.<br /> Rehearse it – mentally (cognitively) or in actual practice.<br />
    10. 10. Why do people act or not?<br />
    11. 11. Why do people act or not?<br /> They can see themselves doing it.<br /> Have opportunities to practice it (get better at it).<br /> Have the necessary component skills to do it (within biological and physical constraints).<br /> Get feedback (internal and external) – making the unobservable observable (performance feedback).<br />
    12. 12. But – they have to be motivated!<br />
    13. 13. But – they have to be motivated!<br />Not acting on what we learn most often happens when the new behavior has little functional value or carries a high risk of punishment.<br />Performing the new behavior results from three types of incentives – the allure of direct, tangible rewards; observed or vicarious rewards - experiencing it though others; and self-produced ones.<br />Behaviors are more likely to occur when they are met with valued outcomes – material benefits, sensory stimulation, positive or negative social reactions, reward of efficacy in controlling events (feeling in control of things).<br />
    14. 14. It’s ALL About Matching<br />
    15. 15. It’s ALL About Matching<br />What’s the desirable or aspirational behavior versus what’s relevant and possible in their life.<br />Understand what is the extraordinarily normal.<br />Create contours and context for behaviors.<br />Be slightly ‘off’ – gradually learn the rules and shape the behavior (coping vs mastery models).<br />Make observable features (self-monitoring).<br />Use other media to surround, permeate and be a continual presence.<br />
    16. 16. Design thinking allows us to look at the contours of people’s lives and discover new opportunities and resources for learning and improving social conditions..<br />
    17. 17. Credits<br />Principles based on: Bandura A. Social foundations of thought and action: A social cognitive theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall Inc, 1986. <br />Cover photo: The Great Wave off Kanagawa. [http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_Great_Wave_off_Kanagawa.jpg]<br />How people learn most of the time photo: Orb of life by Jaxxon. [http://www.flickr.com/photos/jaxxon/72032259]<br />New technologies photo: Learning Muggu by srinivasakrishna. [ttp://www.flickr.com/photos/srinivasakrishna/2261211468/]<br />Why do people pay attention? photo: Confusion by Dave Nitsche. [http://www.flickr.com/photos/60486745@N00/390044745].<br />Why do people remember it? photo: I can taste summer!byBitzi. [http://www.flickr.com/photos/bitzi/176304506]<br />Why do people act or not? photo: Stage rehearsal for performance by _dai_. [http://www.flickr.com/photos/daiharuki/484522382]<br />But they have to be motivated! photo: A little push by Stephaniedan. [http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephaniedan/2615420737]<br />It’s ALL about matching! photo: Imitation of life by Ko_An. [http://www.flickr.com/photos/ko_an/173692337]<br />Closing photo: Kenyan weekend marketplace by Craig Lefebvre.<br />

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