Lambert 1Curtis LambertEnglish 101 ESSAY 3Professor Bolton18 July 2012       Annotated Bibliography: Media Piracy and Its ...
Lambert 2economics in Hollywood and throughout the entertainment industry. He states in his essay that,“I remain a bit ama...
Lambert 3Ryan, Johnny. "New Audiences, the Fourth Wall and Extruded Media." A History of the Internet       and the Digita...
Lambert 4pioneered to monitor who is watching what and when. This tactic is valuable when selling webspace and air time to...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Essay 3 annotated bibliography rough draft 18 july 2012

1,017 views

Published on

Published in: News & Politics, Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,017
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Essay 3 annotated bibliography rough draft 18 july 2012

  1. 1. Lambert 1Curtis LambertEnglish 101 ESSAY 3Professor Bolton18 July 2012 Annotated Bibliography: Media Piracy and Its Effect on the Entertainment Industry One of the major issues plaguing Hollywood and the entertainment industry today is theongoing debate of the definition of media piracy and where to draw the line within the law. Thearticle that was the catalyst for this research topic was Lawrence Lessig’s essay, “Some Like itHot,” which deals with the age old question: what is wrong with downloading music and moviesfor free? I will concede that there are still unanswered questions and on-going debates about howto legally address and correct the apparent plethora of media piracy that exists in our currentdigital world. Nevertheless, lawmakers want those affected by these copyright infringements tocontinue to be patient as current technology is ever evolving: we just need to give the law “timeto seek that balance” (Lessig 92). I will contend that the precedent for media piracy laws havebeen set since before the turn of the 20th century, and although the type of media continues todevelop and progress at a pace beyond our ability to keep up, the basic statute of the law has notchanged: if one duplicates and/or sells or uses someone else’s media, in any form, without theirwritten or express permission, then they are breaking the law.Sanchez, Julian. "Internet Regulation & the Economics of Piracy." Cato Institute 17 Jan 2012: n. pag. SIRS Issues Researcher. Web. 18 June 2011 This essay details Mr. Sanchez’s research on how the entertainment industry, as a whole,has over dramatized the effect that media piracy and Peer-2-Peer file sharing has had on the
  2. 2. Lambert 2economics in Hollywood and throughout the entertainment industry. He states in his essay that,“I remain a bit amazed that it’s become an indisputable premise in Washington that there’s anenormous piracy problem…and that some kind of aggressive new legislation is needed to stanchthe bleeding….” He goes on to say that he finds it preposterous that the entertainment industry isputting so much pressure on Congress that they [Congress] have no option but to reformlegislation immediately when “...the data we do have doesn’t remotely seem to justify theDEFCON One rhetoric that now appears to be obligatory on the Hill.” (par. 2) This essay was published by the CATO Institute, a think tank on economics and thegovernment’s involvement in our American liberties. The introduction paragraph from their website defines their mantra like this: The Cato Institute is a public policy research organization —a think tank — dedicated to the principles of individual liberty, limited government, free marketsand peace. Its scholars and analysts conduct independent, nonpartisan research on a wide rangeof policy issues. I have chosen to cite this particular essay in my research because it is a bit of aconundrum for me. The author and the research institute seem to be saying two different things.Mr. Sanchez and the CATO Institute, although they claim to be for less government and moreliberties, they are encroaching on my liberties, and the liberties of many others in theentertainment field, by their casual approach to the effects that media piracy is having on artistsin this country and their [CATO Institute] belief that Capitol Hill has been whipped in to a frenzyon this issue with no real merit to back of the claims of these artists.
  3. 3. Lambert 3Ryan, Johnny. "New Audiences, the Fourth Wall and Extruded Media." A History of the Internet and the Digital Future. 2010: 151-163. SIRS Issues Researcher. Web. 27 June 2012.Film On Demand MLA FORMAT SOURCE The film, DIY explores the burgeoning industry of new media: the internet, and its effecton the big screen and television. The film deals primarily with production companies whodevelop and broadcast their own materials via the World Wide Web. This new medium isbecoming increasingly popular, especially with the YouTube generation, and their viewership issteadily on the rise. These companies are capitalizing on the fast paced, information age, societywe have become, with our need to have information at our fingertips the moment it is happening,not ten minutes ago, but almost, if not, in real time. Some of the new internet programmingproduction companies may have as many as nine hundred channels available to subscribers. I chose to cite this film because it addresses in great detail the main issue of my thesisand the basis for my research paper: anyone can pick up a camera or microphone and produce, orreproduce someone else’s material, for broadcast or publication with little or no backlash, muchless legal consequences. There are no guide lines or restrictions that can be readily applied tomonitor copyrighted material, much less protect original programming, streaming on the internet.Some of these internet production companies are charging for their programming, but most arefree, and many do not even require a website registration. I will use this film reference to support my claim that YouTube used groundbreakingtechnology designed to allow anyone to broadcast themselves on the internet, therefore many ofthese upstart internet production companies are using the same technology that YouTube
  4. 4. Lambert 4pioneered to monitor who is watching what and when. This tactic is valuable when selling webspace and air time to advertisers, which is where these companies are making the largest amountof their income, if not all, of their income. That being said, if these companies can figure out howto track their viewer’s every move, and are now promoting boxes to add to our televisions so weno longer need cable or satellite, then why are they not able to develop software that will givecredit to artists when they broadcast said artists material? Everyone who picks up a camera orsubmits material to YouTube is not going to have a working knowledge of piracy laws.Nevertheless, ignorance of the law is no excuse in any other aspect of society, so why do weallow it so freely in media?Hard Copy BOOK

×