Reality BitesSusan Hamilton and Peter McKeaguesusan.hamilton@rcahms.gov.uk Peter.mckeague@rcahms.gov.uk
• Identifies, surveys and interprets the built environment of Scotland• Preserve, care for and add to the information and ...
Data and Recording at RCAHMS
Context: Canmore and Canmore Mappinghttp://canmore.rcahms.gov.uk/http://canmoremapping.rcahms.gov.uk/(C) Crown Copyright a...
Context: PASTMAP and other sites21datasets(C) Crown Copyright and database right 2013. All rights reserved.Ordnance Survey...
Context: Online applicationsAvailability of WMS – links
Context: Making Data openAcknowledgement : work undertaken by Min Zhang whilstan intern at OS under supervision of John Go...
Definitions and ScopeOpen: Open Knowledge Foundation“A piece of content or data is open if anyone is free to use, reuse, a...
Context: Where we are coming from
Context: Where we are coming from
Exploring the issues
Case Study One: Ordnance Survey IPROS 1:10,000 paper map OS Open DataOS MasterMap(Licenced)(C) Crown Copyright and databas...
Case Study Two: MAGIMetal detecting finds add significantly to our knowledge of the past. Subsequent excavationrevealed th...
Case Study Two: MAGI
Case Study Three: Content and social mediaThe Case of Lost Edinburgh...
Case Study Four: SURE
Can we truly have open data ?
Peter McKeague and Susan HamiltonPeter.mckeague@rcahms.gov.uk susan.hamilton@rcahms.gov.uk
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Reality Bites

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The RCAHMS Review of 2003 reported the impending launch of the ‘Heritage Portal’, a ‘GIS interface’ designed to make available RCAHMS and Historic Scotland datasets. A decade on, the resulting product PastMap is one of many collaborative ventures that make Scottish heritage data available online. Others include direct access to the National Record by heritage professionals from across Scotland, enabling instant sharing and updating of relevant data and provision of information as Web Services. This paper shares the experience of digital partnerships from our perspective as early adopters, focusing particularly on the challenges of moving towards open data.

Susan Hamilton and Peter McKeague
Computing Applications in Archaeology 2013 (25-28 March)
University of Western Australia

Published in: Technology, Business
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  • Going to use four case studies to explore a number of issues. Each has a theme which is applicable to other areas of work and that will need increasing consideration. There is also an overarching theme, which is the lag between the technology and the legalities – this isn’t an excuse, but it is important to bear in mind. The speed at which we are moving from ‘publication = books’ to ‘publication = online’ means that there will be hiccups along the way, a few of which we will share with you here. Although these case studies do not all discuss Open Data, the issues they bring up reflect the discussions which will be necessary if and when RCAHMS data is made more openly availabl.
  • Programme of work, and a service, which can be described as ‘post open-data’. Preceding paperwork and discussions bear the probability of data being made openly available in mind; flexible licensing when collections are involved. Result? The initial discussions can be protracted (important lesson is not to underestimate the time this will take!)
  • Reality Bites

    1. 1. Reality BitesSusan Hamilton and Peter McKeaguesusan.hamilton@rcahms.gov.uk Peter.mckeague@rcahms.gov.uk
    2. 2. • Identifies, surveys and interprets the built environment of Scotland• Preserve, care for and add to the information and the items in the NationalCollection relating to the archaeological, architectural and historical environment•Promote public understanding and enjoyment of the information and the items inthe collectionThe role of RCAHMS
    3. 3. Data and Recording at RCAHMS
    4. 4. Context: Canmore and Canmore Mappinghttp://canmore.rcahms.gov.uk/http://canmoremapping.rcahms.gov.uk/(C) Crown Copyright and database right 2013. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100020548
    5. 5. Context: PASTMAP and other sites21datasets(C) Crown Copyright and database right 2013. All rights reserved.Ordnance Survey Licence number 100020548
    6. 6. Context: Online applicationsAvailability of WMS – links
    7. 7. Context: Making Data openAcknowledgement : work undertaken by Min Zhang whilstan intern at OS under supervision of John Goodwin and Glen Hart.
    8. 8. Definitions and ScopeOpen: Open Knowledge Foundation“A piece of content or data is open if anyone is free to use, reuse, and redistribute it— subject only, at most, to the requirement to attribute and/or share-alike.”Data & Content: SourceWhen we talk of “data” we need to be a bit careful because the word isn’t particularlyprecise: “data” can mean a few or even a single items (for example a singlebibliographic record, a lat/long etc) or “data” can mean a large collection (e.g. all thematerial in the database). To avoid confusion we shall reserve the term “contents” tomean the individual items, and data to denote the collection.Open Data: Beale (2012)“...the notion of making data freely available online with minimal restrictions on reuseand redistribution. Data in this instance can be all the data resulting from research,rather than solely the research results.”Open Archaeology: Beck & Neylon (2012)“Open Archaeology shares much of the philosophy of these open approaches and ispredicated on promoting open redistribution and access to the data, processes andsnytheses generated within the archaeological domain. This is aimed at both theproduction and consumption of archaeological knowledge with the associated aim ofmaximising transparency, reuse and engagement while maintaining professionalprobity.”Cole (2012)“Some of the literature of open data seems to imply that data is either open or closed”
    9. 9. Context: Where we are coming from
    10. 10. Context: Where we are coming from
    11. 11. Exploring the issues
    12. 12. Case Study One: Ordnance Survey IPROS 1:10,000 paper map OS Open DataOS MasterMap(Licenced)(C) Crown Copyright and database right 2013.All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100020548(C) Crown Copyright and database right 2013. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100020548
    13. 13. Case Study Two: MAGIMetal detecting finds add significantly to our knowledge of the past. Subsequent excavationrevealed that these uninspiring cropmarks were traces of an important settlement.
    14. 14. Case Study Two: MAGI
    15. 15. Case Study Three: Content and social mediaThe Case of Lost Edinburgh...
    16. 16. Case Study Four: SURE
    17. 17. Can we truly have open data ?
    18. 18. Peter McKeague and Susan HamiltonPeter.mckeague@rcahms.gov.uk susan.hamilton@rcahms.gov.uk

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