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Performance, Learning, Leadership, & Knowledge

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Performance Management is a long term process that focuses on continuous performance improvement or "change" for short. Its goal is to create a climate of shared understanding about what is to be achieved, and then developing people to increase the chance that it will indeed be achieved.

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Performance, Learning, Leadership, & Knowledge

  1. 1. Performance, Learning, Leadership, & Knowledge<br />Roy Burchfield<br />1/1/2007<br />
  2. 2. Drink from the new ideal<br />When you lose small mind,<br />You free your life.<br />Life is a waterfall,<br />We drink from the river,<br />Then we turn around and put up our walls. <br />When you free your eyes.<br />Internal prize. -- Aerials by System of a Down <br />
  3. 3. Performance Management<br />
  4. 4. Learning Verses Rejection of New Ideas<br />Our preferences are quite unstable, especially when we are first introduced to something new. This is because we need time to "learn" about the new object or idea. <br />We also tend to make up stories by picking up subtle clues when we are introduced to something new. This is because we do not have the "language" to talk about something new, radical, or daring. <br />
  5. 5. Reframe for the Holistic<br />
  6. 6. The Four Levels of Training Evaluation <br />
  7. 7. Level One-Reaction<br />Reaction informs you how relevant the training is to the work the learners perform<br />Learning informs you to the degree of relevance that the training package worked to transfer KSAs from the training material to the learners<br />The performance level informs you of the degree that the learning can actually be applied to the learner's job <br />Impact informs you of the "return" the organization receives from the training. Decision-makers prefer this harder "result," although not necessarily in dollars and cents. For example, a recent study of financial and information technology executives found that they consider both hard and soft "returns" when it comes to customer-centris technologies, but give more weight to non-financial metrics (soft), such as customer satisfaction and loyalty (Hayes, 2003). <br />
  8. 8. Level Two<br />What knowledge was acquired? <br />What skills were developed or enhanced? <br />What attitudes were changed? <br />
  9. 9. Level Three - Performance (behavior)<br />
  10. 10. Level Four - Results<br />Reaction informs you how relevant the training is to the work the learners perform<br />Learning informs you to the degree of relevance that the training package worked to transfer KSAs from the training material to the learners<br />The performance level informs you of the degree that the learning can actually be applied to the learner's job <br />Impact informs you of the "return" the organization receives from the training. Decision-makers prefer this harder "result," although not necessarily in dollars and cents. For example, a recent study of financial and information technology executives found that they consider both hard and soft "returns" when it comes to customer-centris technologies, but give more weight to non-financial metrics (soft), such as customer satisfaction and loyalty (Hayes, 2003). <br />
  11. 11. Level Four - Results<br />Financial: A measurement, such as an ROI, that shows a monetary return, or the impact itself, such as how the output is affected. Financial can be either soft or hard results. <br />Customer: Improving an area in which the organization differentiates itself from competitors to attract, retain, and deepen relationships with its targeted customers. <br />Internal: Achieve excellence by improving such processes as supply-chain management, production process, or support process. <br />Innovation and Learning: Ensuring the learning package supports a climate for organizational change, innovation, and the growth of individuals. <br />
  12. 12. Flow Rather than Script<br />
  13. 13. Job Performance Needs<br />Performance Gaps <br />Analysis Information <br />Jobs and Tasks <br />Tasks <br />Analysis Templates (RTF file) <br />Various Approaches to Needs Analysis <br />
  14. 14. Performance Improvement is a tool to bridge the performance gap <br />
  15. 15. Analysis<br />
  16. 16. Design Phase<br />
  17. 17. Know<br />
  18. 18. Knowledge<br />First, there is content: "a fluid mix of framed experience, contextual information, values and expert insight." This includes a number of things that we have within us, such as experiences, beliefs, values, how we feel, motivation, and information. <br />The second part defines the function or purpose of knowledge, "that provides a framework for evaluating and incorporating new experiences and information." Notice how this relates back to Locke's definition -- we have within us a framework (one idea) that we use for evaluating new experiences (the second idea). <br />
  19. 19. Types of Knowledge<br />
  20. 20. Velocity and Viscosity<br />

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