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Position of adverbs and adverb
phrases
NEF upper-intermediate
Unit 2C
Adverbs of frequency (how often?)
• Before a main verb
I usually work on Saturdays
• After “to be”
She’s always late
• Som...
Adverbs of manner (how?)
• After the verb or phrase they modify
I don’t understand you when you speak quickly
• In mid-pos...
Adverbs of time (when?)
• At the end of a sentence
They’ll be here soon
It rained all day yesterday
Adverbs of degree (how much?)
• Extremely/incredibly/very: before the adjective
they go with
We’re incredibly tired
• Much...
Comment adverbs (opinion)
• Luckily, clearly, obviously, apparently … : at the
beginning of the sentence or clause
Unfortu...
• Luckily, clearly, obviously, apparently … : at the
beginning of the sentence or clause
Unfortunately, we arrived half an...
• Most other adverbs go in mid-position (before
the main verb, but after an auxiliary verb)
I just need ten more minutes
S...
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Position of adverbs and adverb phrases

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Position of adverbs and adverb phrases

  1. 1. Position of adverbs and adverb phrases NEF upper-intermediate Unit 2C
  2. 2. Adverbs of frequency (how often?) • Before a main verb I usually work on Saturdays • After “to be” She’s always late • Sometimes/usually/normally can go at the beginning of a sentence too
  3. 3. Adverbs of manner (how?) • After the verb or phrase they modify I don’t understand you when you speak quickly • In mid-position with passive verbs The driver was seriously injured
  4. 4. Adverbs of time (when?) • At the end of a sentence They’ll be here soon It rained all day yesterday
  5. 5. Adverbs of degree (how much?) • Extremely/incredibly/very: before the adjective they go with We’re incredibly tired • Much/a lot: after the verb or verb phrase they go with Britons drink a lot • A little/a bit: before an adjective, after a verb or verb phrase I’m a little tired She sleeps a bit in the afternoon
  6. 6. Comment adverbs (opinion) • Luckily, clearly, obviously, apparently … : at the beginning of the sentence or clause Unfortunately, we arrived half an hour late Ideally, we should leave at 10.00
  7. 7. • Luckily, clearly, obviously, apparently … : at the beginning of the sentence or clause Unfortunately, we arrived half an hour late Ideally, we should leave at 10.00
  8. 8. • Most other adverbs go in mid-position (before the main verb, but after an auxiliary verb) I just need ten more minutes She didn’t even say goodbye

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